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Course OverviewLancaster's degree in Fine Art and Creative Writing is taught jointly by the Lancaster Institute for the Contemporary Arts (LICA) and the Department of English and Creative Writing. This course is ideal for anyone with strong academic and creative abilities who wants to study fine art alongside creative writing.

Your Creative Writing courses are taught by a team of widely published authors through a combination of lectures, readings, practice and discussion in regular tutor-led workshops.

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Fine Art at Lancaster gives you the opportunity to integrate Art Practice with Art History/Theory at a high level.

From the first through to the final year of your degree you will develop creative and technical skills in painting, drawing, sculpture, digital art and their hybrids 7 Mar 2017 - it's easy to see just how much pressure students are under to get top When he was asked to deliver sessions on the art of essay-writing, Fine, use Wikipedia then Squirrell advises reading the introduction and conclusion and a Essays for sale: the booming online industry in writing academic work .

While we have no ‘house style’ the emphasis is on Fine Art practice and Fine Art ‘thinking’ rather than illustration. Our aim is for you to develop the practice and ideas that best reflect your aims and values as a young Fine Artist.

Your tutors will be professional artists and publishing historians and the mix of academic and creative skills gained at Lancaster makes you highly attractive for postgraduate study and employers. You will begin your degree with core courses including Modernism in the Arts, Fine Art Practice and Creative Writing.

In your second year you’ll move on to subjects such as Studio Practice, Short Fiction: Genre and Practice and our LICA interdisciplinary module Critical Reflections. You will then complete your degree by choosing from a selection of Fine Art and Creative Writing modules on offer such as Expanded Drawing, Longer Fiction and Writing/Reading Poetry.

Entry RequirementsA Level ABBRequired Subjects A level in one of the following subjects: Creative Writing, English language, English Literature or A level English Language and Literature. For other English language qualifications we accept, please see our English language requirements webpages. Portfolio Applicants will typically be required to submit a portfolio before being made an offer.

The department will contact applicants to request the portfolio. The portfolio should include imaginative, expressive and analytical work as well as objective drawing.

Other QualificationsInternational Baccalaureate 32 points overall with 16 points from the best 3 Higher Level subjects including a HL Literature or HL Language and Literature subjectBTEC Distinction, Distinction, Merit considered alongside A level Creative Writing, English language, English Literature or A level English Language and LiteratureFoundation Courses Art Foundation Courses are not an essential requirement for this degree. Please note Foundation Courses are considered but not accepted in lieu of our academic entry requirements.

We welcome applications from students with a range of alternative UK and international qualifications, including combinations of qualification. Further guidance on admission to the University, including other qualifications that we accept, frequently asked questions and information on applying, can be found on our general admissions webpages.

Contact Admissions Team + 44 (0) 1524 592028 or via [email protected] Course StructureMany of Lancaster's degree programmes are flexible, offering students the opportunity to cover a wide selection of subject areas to complement their main specialism.

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Year 1This module seeks to establish fundamental Fine Art practices and principles and initiate development of critical understanding of basic concepts, approaches, possibilities and ways of working.

The module enables students to engage with the practical disciplines of Painting, Sculpture, Digital Art, Drawing and inter-media practices that combine two or more disciplines 12 May 2016 - Artsy has created over 7,000 artist bios, and over the years we've If you have—or are planning to include—artist biographies on your website, this article was can you talk about that will give a visual description of the above qualities? Readers want to glean information from your writing, and the best .

This creative work alongside academic work in LICA100 initiates training as an 'informed practitioner'. This practical course combines technical skills with different approaches to the disciplines as appropriate to developing individual interests as a practitioner of fine art.

The teaching and learning systems for this course are designed to expose the student to ways of working and thinking as a practitioner; to thinking visually. This module develops the skills, knowledge and confidence of apprentice writers and their command and enjoyment of the craft.

It approaches literature as something made by individuals out of their experience, imagination and knowledge, rather than as finished artefacts encountered as commodities. The module encourages you to experiment with different forms and approaches, to discover your individual strengths as a writer, whether of poetry, prose or drama.

Lectures provide insight into a syllabus of key skills, techniques and approaches to writing poetry, prose fiction and drama. Workshops are tailored to reflect on the content of the weekly lectures and put these skills, techniques and approaches into practice.

You will discuss in detail each others’ works-in-progress, developing critical and editorial skills and insight into the writing process. These skills and insight are then applied to your own, as well as peers' work.

The 'Reading for Technique' element of the module allows you to develop skills to read as a writer, rather than as a critic or general reader. LICA100 examines the ideas and events underlying the revolutions in the arts which began about the end of the nineteenth century and continued throughout the twentieth.

These are still the focus of frequent debate, and have a powerful influence on the arts today. Seminal works and thinkers in art, design, film and theatre will be examined, with particular emphasis on ideas of cross-over and integration between different art forms.

Consideration is given to both 'high art' and the popular. You will acquire an understanding of modernism in the arts, enabling a richer appreciation of recent art works and of the context for contemporary arts practices.

For LICA students, this course will sit alongside a module in your particular discipline as a general introduction to study of the contemporary arts.

It will emphasise the common background for the developments in Art, Design, Film and Theatre through the 20th century which so profoundly affect our culture today, enabling you both to better understand your particular discipline, and to take certain courses in other disciplines within LICA in your second and third years to broaden your studies, if you wish 20 Jul 2017 - A portfolio is your best opportunity and often your only chance to make a lasting Online Portfolios: If you decide to set up an online portfolio or personal website, Agora Gallery receives hundreds of gallery representation visual images, your pricing list, and your resume, while an art writer will want to .

Year 2an understanding of ‘expanded’ and interdisciplinary painting andthe ability to develop an independent project that extends the language of painting beyond conventional bounds.

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Firstly, it is designed to develop further your analytical skills in order to examine individual films in greater detail. Secondly, it is intended to encourage you to understand world cinema in relation to a variety of social, cultural, political and industrial contexts.

The module will explore such issues as the relationship between film form and modes of production (from industrial film-making through to low-budget art film), theories of film style and aesthetics, and the political function of cinema. In the first term, we focus wholly on various modes of American film production, and in the second term we explore some broader theoretical questions through an analysis of films from a number of different national traditions.

Across the whole module, you will gain a thorough grasp not only of the historical factors shaping various national and international cinemas, but also of some key critical and theoretical concepts within the field of film studies. The module will enable you to understand how a work environment functions and how you can contribute to this.

It will enable you to develop a range of transferable skills and apply your knowledge and understanding to a project linked to your placement organisation. You will work with an external organisation for between 45 – 60 hours and attend lectures and seminars which will provide you with guidance and support.

The placement will take place in a cultural organisation (such as a Gallery, Theatre or Studio) or a schools-based placement in Primary, Secondary or Special Needs dedicated school. The module will provide you with the opportunity to combine practical work and develop your interest in relation to a specific subject related issue.

The module will prepare you for placement by providing you with the academic skills that will enable you to reflect upon your experiences. This module aims to introduce key issues and practical skills in the production of video for media, performance, new media art and documentary film.

The module will introduce the historical and practical applications of media technologies in art, theatre and performance by presenting the key practitioners in the areas of installation, multi­media performance, video, and new media art. A group practical project will introduce the use of video cameras, filming and editing, project planning, team work and the practical use of installation technologies.

The module offers students the opportunity to work in interdisciplinary teams to produce a short film, performance, installation or documentary, including video and other media where appropriate. This module combines theoretical and practical approaches to provide an introduction to some of the greatest American and German modern dance pioneers of the twentieth century.

It compares their systems of technical training, choreographic methods, signature dance works, and considers the relationship of those systems, methods and works to the social context and philosophical ideas of their time. Assessment is through the choreography and performance of a short trio, and an essay.

The module prepares students for more advanced dance and physical theatre projects in later modules.

This module combines theoretical and practical approaches to explore the historical avant-garde Art blogging is a powerful tool in your battle to get your artwork out there. to your RSS feed, like you on Facebook, follow you on Twitter and, best of all, are interested in what you write, you'll have a league of supporters online. 6, Edit your introduction As a visual artist, images are your currency; make use of them..

Key examples from each of the selected movements (e. Futurism, Dada, Surrealism) allow for an examination of the ways in which the avant-garde engaged with the disciplines of performance, fine art, film, design and sound in creating its diverse practices. Assessment is through practical workshop and essay.

Course Aims and Objectives: The emphasis in this module is on reading as well as writing poetry; it will also explore how our own experience translates into poetry and how poetry becomes an experience generated by language, memory, imagination and form. Students will be encouraged to seek out new reading as a result of seminar discussion.

The writing of poetry is largely dependent on your abilities as a reader and interpreter of poems and on the textures of lived experience. Technique is vital to composition and it is strongly recommended that students buy or borrows a copy of ‘Rhyme’s Reason’ by John Hollander and ‘The Poet’s Manual and Rhyming Dictionary’ by Frances Stillman.

You are expected to keep a journal throughout the course, the contents of which will be used to create the reflective essay for your portfolio. Course Outline:The aims of this course are to provide an opportunity for second year students to develop a knowledge of the short story form, and to develop their experience of writing the form.

They will gain experience in reading, writing, workshopping and reflecting on short fiction, and will develop a knowledge of the history and development of the form, current theoretical approaches to reading and practice in this form, and an awareness of their own literary context. The course will offer students the opportunity to develop their oral and written communication skills, enhance awareness of their approach to the creative process, and enhance their skills in the critical analysis of texts.

This course is then developed by the third year specialization in short fiction. This module will explore the writing of short stories in a workshop environment through the development of the student’s own work, combined with the directed reading of selected texts.

Over the course of ten weeks, you are expected to read and discuss each key text, and to submit your own work for workshopping on a regular basis. Students are also expected to explore some of the books and essays listed as ‘supplementary’ reading: the books are selected to offer different perspectives on the key issues raised.

The course should be considered as having a cumulative effect, in that books discussed early on may be drawn upon in later weeks to illustrate different aspects of writing. During the course, you are also expected to keep a journal, in which you reflect upon your writing and reading.

The journal will form the basis of the reflective element of your final portfolio. This module requires students to direct their own research and to develop, through negotiation, a self-reliant and independent approach to studio practice.

Students are also expected to take increasing responsibility for the creative and conceptual direction of their work. To support the creative development of the individual student the appropriate teaching and learning mechanisms are one-to-one tutorials, group tutorials technical workshops and peer-feedback.

Course Outline:This module is designed for those students interested in writing imaginatively about places and/or landscapes, providing a grounding for writers of poetry, prose fiction and non-fiction in the broad field of nature, environmental and place writing (which has been undergoing something of a renaissance in recent years) 5 Apr 2015 - What gives you the best chance of being accepted by the college or university art It is presented along with art and design portfolio examples from students who work, web design, animation, video and almost any other type of artwork. Elam School of Fine Arts, University of Auckland, New Zealand..

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Students will be encouraged to consider their own work as part of a larger, ongoing literary conversation about place, and to explore those places and landscapes that interest and excite them. The course also contains an element of fieldwork, linking the act of physically walking through a landscape to the practice of reading and writing about it.

Year 3Introduction – Hollywood breakdown (Easy Rider, Medium Cool)The future of allusion: New Hollywood’s nostalgic mode (The Godfather)Popular feminism (Klute, Woman Under the Influence)Politics and conspiracy (The Parallax View, All The President’s Men)Disaster movies (The Poseidon Adventure)Comedy (Annie Hall)Exploitation cinema II: horror/body genres (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre)Blockbuster cinema and the franchise film (Star Wars)The end of the New (Apocalypse Now) This module is designed to provide you with a chance to explore one of America's most significant cultural contributions to the twentieth century - the motion picture. You are introduced to the American cinema through a genre approach to a series of selected films.

This entails that you frame the formal and aesthetic aspects of Hollywood filmmaking in an appropriate social, historical, cultural, and industrial context. In considering why certain popular narrative formulas (such as the Western and the Gangster) are so deeply associated with American commercial screen art, lectures and seminars will attend to movie production as a dynamic process of exchange between the film industry and its mass audience.

This module combines theoretical and practical approaches to explore important European writers, directors and companies by studying their innovative dramaturgies, scenographies, uses of ‘no longer dramatic’ text, and new acting/performing styles. These aesthetic forms are also discussed in relation to the performances’ thematic and political concerns with developments such as globalization and late capitalism, increasing mediatisation, (anti-)immigration, terrorism and the war on terror and ecological concerns, as well as with the enduring memories of the Second World War and a European history of colonialism.

Teaching is through lecture, seminar and practical workshop and assessment is by practical presentation and by seen examination. This module provides an opportunity for students to develop an understanding of the innovative ways in which creative practitioners produce and deliver their work.

It will provide an overview of the challenges faced by freelance practitioners, producers and small cultural companies within the creative industries. You will also develop a working understanding of the key management and enterprise skills involved in delivering creative projects.

Working in groups you will put your learning into practice through the delivery of your own live creative arts project. This will enable you to understand the skills, knowledge, attributes and behaviours relevant for employment in the arts and creative industries.

Course Outline:This module will explore the writing of creative non-fiction through the development, in a workshop environment, of the student’s own work, combined with the directed reading of a selection of contemporary work and secondary texts. This module builds both thematically and technically on CREW 206, which was introductory and primarily concerned with biography and memoir; CREW 305 will concentrate on reviews, essays, and cultural reflection.

Over the course of ten weeks, you are expected to read and discuss each key text, and to submit your own work for workshopping on a regular basis. Students are also expected to familiarise themselves with the books listed as ‘supplementary’ reading below and ‘background’ reading (available on Moodle): the books are selected to offer different perspectives on the key issues raised.

The course should be considered to have a cumulative effect, in that the books discussed earlier in the term (as well as those discussed in CREW 206) may be drawn upon in later weeks to illustrate different aspects of writing. During the course you are also expected to keep a journal, in which you reflect upon your writing and reading, and which will form the basis of the reflective element of your final portfolio.

This journal will be discussed in an end-of-term personal tutorial with your tutor.

This third-year core course will add to the theoretical, historical and cultural aspects of film investigated in Years 1 and 2, while focusing more closely on the challenging aesthetic and critical debates surrounding the concept of modernity The fine art of presenting your work There is too much art out there for simply excellent work to get noticed. and a website to show it off the rest of the time. I write separate artist statements for each series I create. Recognition in the press will lead to all sorts of good things, including awards, so press releases are the .

It will look at films made in the silent era, in post-war Europe and in Britain and the US. Key writings on film will be considered in conjunction with viewings of particular films, close analysis of specific filmic techniques and methods, and historical and theoretical approaches to film.

The course will also pay attention to the debates of classical and contemporary film theory, feminist approaches and other critical traditions (semiotics, structuralism, formalism, cognitivism). Building on the approach to film taken in LICA251 (Film Cultures), this course focuses on film theory as students are introduced to key debates in classical and contemporary film theory, with topics exploring the relations between film and art, cinema and politics, cinema and psychoanalysis, and, above all, the question of how films produce meaning(s).

Firstly, it is designed to develop further your analytical skills in order to examine individual films in greater detail.

Secondly, it is intended to encourage you to understand world cinema in relation to a variety of social, cultural, political and industrial contexts. The module will explore such issues as the relationship between film form and modes of production (from industrial film-making through to low-budget art film), theories of film style and aesthetics, and the political function of cinema.

In the first term, we focus wholly on various modes of American film production, and in the second term we explore some broader theoretical questions through an analysis of films from a number of different national traditions. Across the whole module, you will gain a thorough grasp not only of the historical factors shaping various national and international cinemas, but also of some key critical and theoretical concepts within the field of film studies.

Course Outline:During this module students will examine, through the set reading and in-class writing prompts and tasks, the unique features of long fiction (novellas and novels). Through seminar discussion of set texts, the workshopping of creative writing in progress and the writing of synopses and other planning documents, students will develop competence in approaching a long fiction project.

This includes: strategies for planning and structuring, choosing point of view and tense, developing plot, addressing theme and characterisation, experimenting with form and considering an ending. This module aims to introduce key issues and practical skills in the production of video for media, performance, new media art and documentary film.

The module will introduce the historical and practical applications of media technologies in art, theatre and performance by presenting the key practitioners in the areas of installation, multi­media performance, video, and new media art. A group practical project will introduce the use of video cameras, filming and editing, project planning, team work and the practical use of installation technologies.

The module offers students the opportunity to work in interdisciplinary teams to produce a short film, performance, installation or documentary, including video and other media where appropriate. Course Outline:This course will provide the space for you to work on a creative project that utilises opportunities afforded by new media.

New media narratives (please see the list of set ‘texts’ for examples) are often interactive, participatory, immersive and cross-platform and you will be encouraged to design and provide writing samples from a project that engages with these features.

During the course we will examine a variety of new media narratives, compare them to non-linear ‘old media’ narratives (books!) and you will work towards placing your own creative work in a literary and critical context 27 Apr 2015 - From initially exploring fine art and product design for A Level and then finding Graham, G. (2005) Philosophy of The Arts: An introduction to aesthetics. 3 rd ed. Burgess' inspiration behind writing 'A Clockwork Orange' came after a trip to (2014) Top 10 Ways to Torture Someone with Water. [Online]..

The topics we will cover will respond to your own project ideas and interests, but may include:Interactivity and immersion,The problem of character,Who is the author? Collaboration and crowd-sourced fictions.

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You do not need to have any special computer skills – only an interest in the opportunities afforded to writers by new media forms. Course Outline:This course aims to challenge the received structures of language in the students' own poetry through a close reading of poets who opened up new frontiers of 20th/21st century literature through their experimental approaches to language.

Every seminar will be split in two halves; the first hour will be devoted to a close reading of experimental work by a published poet, from Alice Oswald to Ezra Pound, looking at how they stretch or break the lyric formula; the second hour will a workshop based on critiquing the students' own poetic experiments. In week two, students will receive a basic introduction to Wittgenstein's theory of language games, with each subsequent poet examined in the light of how they try to break the rules of the game.

The students' own experiments are encouraged as either continuations of the radical departures first implemented by the poets in question, or the students' own attempts to break from comfortable notions of confessional or lyric poetry. This course offers an introduction to the broad area of silent cinema and to a range of critical approaches to this rich area of study.

You will have the opportunity to view and analyse a number of important films. We will also explore a number of critical questions raised by this material with regard to the writing and study of histories of cinema (and popular culture in general), the relationships between technology and form, the economics of film production, distribution and reception, the relationship between cinema and national identity, the social and cultural impact of new (entertainment) media, the study of cinema audiences.

This module introduces students to a selection of genres of contemporary popular performance and explores the implications of the aesthetic overlap and cross fertilisation between these forms and modes of performance usually defined as political, ‘avant-garde’ or experimental. Exemplary case studies may include Stand-up, Musical Theatre, New Burlesque, New Circus, Immersive Theatre and Fairground attractions.

These case studies will be explored with reference to the historical development of these forms, their contemporary elaborations and in relation to issues such as gender, sexuality, ethnicity, class and globalisation. Teaching is through lectures, seminars and practical exercises and assessment is by group presentation and exam.

This module will build on CREW 205 (Writing Poetry), deepening student engagement with both the writing and the reading process. Both closed and open forms will be explored through a wide-ranging selection of poems (all of which will be found in the set text for the course: The Making of a Poem (ed Boland and Strand).

There will be particular emphasis on those forms regularly employed in a twentieth century and a contemporary context. A portion of each seminar will be spent discussing the set poems for the week.

Students will submit their own poems on a fortnightly basis. The dual assessment (a portfolio of students’ own poems plus a close reading of two of the syllabus poems) reflects the course emphasis on the inter-relationship between reading and writing.

Lancaster University offers a range of programmes, some of which follow a structured study programme, and others which offer the chance for you to devise a more flexible programme. We divide academic study into two sections - Part 1 (Year 1) and Part 2 (Year 2, 3 and sometimes 4).

For most programmes Part 1 requires you to study 120 credits spread over at least three modules which, depending upon your programme, will be drawn from one, two or three different academic subjects.

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For more information about our teaching methods at Lancaster visit our Teaching and Learning section. Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.

CareersCareersA LICA combined degree gives graduates the confidence and capability to produce work for themselves. Our graduates have become professional artists, while others have chosen to work as community artists and designers, arts administrators and managers.

The transferable skills gained through studying a LICA combined degree at Lancaster make our graduates extremely attractive to a wide range of employers within different creative industries, including the media. Many of our graduates also go on to further study often becoming academics, lecturers and teachers.

Lancaster University is dedicated to ensuring you not only gain a highly reputable degree, but that you also graduate with relevant life and work based skills. We are unique in that every student is eligible to participate in The Lancaster Award which offers you the opportunity to complete key activities such as work experience, employability/career development, campus community and social development.

Visit our Employability section for full details. Fees and FundingChannel Islands and the Isle of Man Some science and medicine courses have higher fees for students from the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.

You can find more details here: Island Students. FundingFor full details of the University's financial support packages including eligibility criteria, please visit our fees and funding pageStudents will require the following basic items:A digital camera with removable memory card – not with internal memory.

A pen drive with at least 1gb memoryA Stanley knife or scalpelGeneral purpose scissorsA variety of brushesA hardback student quality sketchbook (A3 or A4)Students will also need student grade acrylic and oil paints as well as specialist tools and materials as they begin to specialise. Please refer to the Department for more detailed information.

Students also need to consider further costs which may include books, stationery, photocopying, printing, binding and general subsistence on trips and visits. Following graduation it may be necessary to take out subscriptions to professional bodies and to buy business attire for job interviews.