Loading...

Who can help me with my ecology coursework bluebook two hours single spaced


How to write an coursework ecology phd academic 11 days writing from scratch

Hello Everyone, Yes it’s been a while and you have been missed.Still, as the seasons change, so does the cuisine.

It is time to embrace the beauty of the coming spring and ALL that is has to offer A Tale of Two Chefs Blog Archive Nature s Gift The Bounty of nbsp.It is time to embrace the beauty of the coming spring and ALL that is has to offer.

With that being said, we present the next theme in our “Pop Up” restaurant series…Nature’s Gift, The Bounty of Spring.On May 18 th, I will showcase a fresh and colorful menu of the wonders that come with the first harvest of the season Sleepy Hollow Let s Be Friends Again.On May 18 th, I will showcase a fresh and colorful menu of the wonders that come with the first harvest of the season.The ingredients will have a focus on items that you associate with coastal shorelines, freashness and new culinary growth Sleepy Hollow Let s Be Friends Again.The ingredients will have a focus on items that you associate with coastal shorelines, freashness and new culinary growth.The sweet smell of lavender, the whimsical smoke of cherry wood and the rich beauty of flowers…all of these feelings will be incorporated into the menu.

As always, we will have surprise bites that will not be listed on the standard menu.And we never have a meal without incredible wine from Chile, including the Concha Y Toro Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc that was a big hit at the Valentine’s Day pop up! If you have ever attended one of the pop ups, you will enjoy the evolution of cuisine.If this is your first time, be prepared to experience the feeling of having your own private chef cook for you based on his world travels and expose you to the new direction of global cuisine.Here is a sneak preview of a small part of the menu… Pisco & Coconut Salmon Ceviche This is the end of the preview.

Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Course Syllabus AED Economics 597.01 (call number 00271-7) and International Studies 597.01 (call number 12482-4) “Problems and Policies in World Population, Food, and Environment” Autumn 2008 Lectures Monday and Wednesday, 2:30 to 4:18, Room 255, Townshend Hall Instructor Professor Douglas Southgate Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics Room 329, Agricultural Administration Building 2120 Fyffe Road 292-2432, email protected Teaching Assistants Kyle Fluegge ( email protected ), 342 Agr., 292-9516 Emilio Hern ndez ( email protected ), 314 Agr.

, 292-9424 Malena Svarch ( email protected ), 342 Agr., 292-9516 Secretary Susan Sheller, Department of AED Economics 240 Agr., 292-6432, email protected Web Site On Carmen ( ), under AEDE 597.Tweeten, The World Food Economy (Basil Blackwell, 2006).Other assigned readings are on the class website.Objectives This course addresses population growth and the challenges it poses – in particular, the challenge of providing everyone with an adequate diet while simultaneously conserving the natural resources on which agriculture and other economic activities depend.Since human numbers are increasing more rapidly in poor countries than anywhere else, special attention is paid to population growth and the prospects for environmentally sound agricultural development in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.The problems arising as a transition is made from communism to a market economy are examined as well since agricultural development has lagged, environmental deterioration has been pronounced, or both in many of the nations experiencing this transition.

Grading and Due Dates A midterm examination, worth 35 points, will be held on Monday, November 3 rd.A non-cumulative final, worth 45 points, will take place from 1:30 to 3:18 on Wednesday, December 10th.As explained in a separate handout, three term papers, each worth 40 points, are required.The first is due at the beginning of class on Monday, October 20th.The second and the third are due at the beginning of class on Monday, November 10th, and Wednesday, December 3rd, respectively.

01 satisfies the tenth GEC requirement, which is a “capstone experience.” Such courses are upper-division and thematic.In addition, they draw on multiple disciplines and enrich students’ experiences of the contemporary world.There are two learning objectives of capstone courses: One is that students “synthesize and apply knowledge from diverse disciplines to contemporary issues.

” The main discipline drawn on in this course, which focuses on contemporary issues in the global food economy, is economics, although demography and environmental geography are used as well.The other objective is that they “write about or conduct research on the contemporary world,” hence the three term papers required in 597.There will be a four-points-per-weekday penalty for any paper submitted after the beginning of the class session on the due date.No term papers will be accepted a week after the due date.

Either the first paper or the second, though not both, can be rewritten, with 4 points deducted from the revised paper’s score (out of 40 possible).Rewriting the third paper will not be an option.Revised versions of the first term paper must be submitted by the beginning of class on November 5th.Revised second papers are due at the beginning of class on November 19th.

At various times, including perhaps twice during the same class session, attendance will be taken.Any student who is absent without an excuse (e., note from a medical clinic, obituary notice for a relative who has passed away, etc.

) when the roll is taken on three or more occasions will have his or her class grade lowered by 20 points.Attendance will be posted on the class web page.It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.

The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.

Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( /info for students/ ).Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 2923307, TDD 292-0901; /.

2 Topical Outline and Reading Assignments 24 Sept.Survey of developing and transition economies.Malthusian model and criticisms of same.“Health, Nutrition, and Economic Growth” Economic Development and Cultural Change 52, pp.“Population, Food, and Knowledge” American Economic Review 90, pp.Population growth and the demographic transition.Projections of future population and food consumption.Farmland degradation, deforestation, and other problems.Economic development and hunger alleviation.3 Food Security and Globalization AED ECON/IS 532, Fall 2008 Ohio State University Instructor: Mike Betz Dept.of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics 317 Agricultural Administration Building E-mail: email protected Teaching Assistant: Michael Kidoido; email: email protected Time/Place: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:30-3:18 p.Prerequisite: AEDE 200 or Econ 200 or permission of the instructor.Credit: 5 credit hours Course Website: Office Hours: Send questions by email any time or talk with me in person before or after class.No formal office hours are scheduled but I can generally meet on short notice if necessary.Course Objectives: Global food security is a complex issue, with many factors contributing to hunger and malnutrition.We will consider these factors in historical and contemporary contexts so as to have a more complete understanding of the subject.

There are five main topics that I would like you to be conversant with after completing the course.Definitions of food security and related terms (malnutrition, hunger, poverty, etc.The magnitude and geographical distribution of food insecurity in the world today; 3.

The primary natural, economic, political, and social causes of food insecurity; 4.Institutions, policies, and technology that can improve food security; 5.The major food security problems of Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, the two parts of the world where hunger is most prevalent.In addition you will be exposed to informational resources that will allow you to continue learning about global food security issues beyond the scope of this class.Grading: Your performance in the course will be assessed as follows: Weight (percent) Class participation 10 Quizzes (weekly, weighted equally) 15 Personal food consumption homework exercise 5 Short papers (2, each worth 15%) 30 Midterm exam 20 Final exam 20 Total 100 Item 4 Readings and Class Participation: You are expected to complete assigned readings each period before class (see course calendar in the syllabus).

Questions are provided for many of the readings (see course calendar).Students are expected to participate in class discussions, drawing upon their reading of assigned materials, prior knowledge, and personal experience.Quizzes: A short quiz over assigned readings will be given at the beginning of each class period.The quiz will be handed out precisely at the time class is scheduled to begin and will be collected five minutes later.Latecomers arriving during this five minute period may take the quiz but will receive no additional time for taking the quiz.

Latecomers arriving more than five minutes after the scheduled start of the class and absentees will receive a grade of zero.Personal Food Consumption Homework Exercise: You will record the cost of your personal food and beverage consumption and your nutritional intake each day for a period of one week.You will then prepare and turn in a spending and nutritional summary for the week.This information will be useful to you later in completing the first short paper.See the course calendar for the due date.

Short papers: There will be two guided writing assignments during the quarter.In Short Paper 1, you will write about how you would adjust your expenditures and lifestyle if you had to live on the minimum wage in the United States.In Short Paper 2, you will analyze the food security situation of a country where hunger has occurred recently.Descriptions of the two short paper assignments are posted on the Carmen website in the Contents section.

You are free to discuss the papers with the instructor, TA, or your colleagues, but the paper must be uniquely your own and must be written entirely by you.

The papers are to be submitted in hardcopy in class and in electronic format in the Dropbox on the Carmen website.See the course calendar for the due dates.Exams: The midterm will cover all material (assigned readings, lectures, videos, and class discussions) up to and including the period before the exam.The final exam will cover all material following the midterm until the end of the course.Dates of the exams are shown on the course calendar.

Exams from last year are posted on the Carmen website in the Contents section.Textbooks (available in the campus bookstore and area bookstores that sell OSU textbooks): • C.Ending Hunger in Our Lifetime: Food Security and Globalization .Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003Referred to on course calendar as "Runge et al.Strengthening Rural Communities: Hunger Report 2005.Washington, DC: Bread for the World Institute, 2005.

Referred to on the course calendar as "BWI 2005." Available electronically at /learn/hunger-reports/ .5 Other Assigned Readings: Readings outside the textbooks are available on the Carmen website via links on the course calendar.Helpful Websites: • • • • The United Nations Food and Agriculture Administration The International Food Policy Research Institute The United Nations World Food Program USAID Famine Early Warning Systems Network Course Policies: 1.Attendance policy: You are expected to attend class.

A quiz is given every day, and late-comers and absentees will receive a score of zero on the quiz.Late Submission of Assignments : A late paper will be penalized one-quarter of a grade for each day it is late.Academic Honesty: Academic misconduct of any kind is not acceptable.

Probably the most common form of academic misconduct is plagiarism, defined as follows in the university’s Code of Student Conduct: “Plagiarism is the representation of another's work or ideas as one's own; it includes the unacknowledged word-for-word use and/or paraphrasing of another person's work, and/or the inappropriate unacknowledged use of another person's ideas.” For a detailed definition of academic misconduct, see /resource .Also, read “Ten Suggestions for Preserving Academic Integrity” at /coam/ .To resolve any doubt about what activities constitute academic misconduct and what procedures are followed, consult the instructor.Disability Services: Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; / .6 Course Calendar, AEDE/IS 532, AU 2008 Topic 1 Introduction to food security, development, and globalization – definitions and trends The course begins with a narrative account of the Hassan family in Bangladesh and with a video of the village of La Esperanza in Honduras, emphasizing factors that contribute to malnutrition and food insecurity.With these portraits of hunger as background, we then examine the number of hungry people in the world and the parts of the world where hunger is most persistent.We also examine several definitions of food insecurity.

Date 9/25 9/30 Topic 2 Read before class Runge, Ch.1-9 BWI 2005, Chapter 1, Who are the Rural Poor? Pages 14-29.2, Hunger in a Prosperous World, pages 13-37.

Runge, Appendix A, Methodology Used for Hunger Projections, pages 209-213.2, Why are So Many People in the Developing World Poor and Hungry? Pp.link Reading Questions ? Yes Other Activity Lecture Notes Notes 9-25-08 Yes Yes Yes Yes Begin record-keeping for Personal Food Consumption homework Notes 9-30-08 Social science concepts for analyzing food security In this section, we use simple but powerful concepts and analytical frameworks from economics, demographics, public health, and ethics to make sense out of food insecurity situations.

In particular, we use a simple model of demand and supply to analyze global food security.We also utilize the entitlement framework developed by Amartya Sen, an economist and philosopher who received the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1998 largely for his analysis of famines.As food insecurity is closely linked with poverty, we review recent evolution in thinking about poverty.Date 10/2 10/7 10/9 Topic 3 Read before class Runge, Ch.

3, Ending Hunger Sustainably, pages 39-68.

Runge, Appendix B, IMPACT Model Description, pages 215-225.DFID, Section 1, Introduction to the Sustainable Livelihoods Approach, pages 1, 57.link DFID, Section 2, Sustainable Livelihoods Framework.link DFID, Section 4, Methods of Implementing Sustainable Livelihoods Approaches, pages 1, 5-8.link Reading Questions ? Other Activity Lecture Notes Yes Notes 9-27-08 Yes Yes In class-video: Black Gold Yes Personal Food Consumption homework due Yes Notes 10-07-08 Discuss Shot Paper 1 Notes 10-09-08 Food security and poverty at household and community levels Over the past decade, food security analysts have become increasingly aware that the household is one of the most important institutions affecting food security.

In this section, we focus on strategies that poor households use to obtain their livelihoods and to cope with risk.Drawing on recent literature on intra-household distribution, we consider social and economic factors that determine how food and other resources are allocated within the household.Date Read before class Reading Questions ? Other Activity Lecture Notes 7 10/14 Topic 4 Banerjee and Duflo.4, Strengthening Rural Communities in the Developing World, pages 64-83.

link IFPRI, Women: The Key to Food Security, pages 1-4.link Yes Notes 10-14-08 Yes Yes Nutritional concepts for analyzing food security Food must provide more than energy for bodies and minds to grow and be healthy.The diet must also provide protein, vitamins, and minerals.An adequate diet is especially important for the physical and mental development of children.Date Read before class 10/16 BWI 2006, Ch.

3, Understanding Malnutrition: Knowledge to Combat Hunger, pages 68-85.link World Bank, Overview, pages, 1-19.4, Ending Chronic Hunger in the Developing World: Nourishing the Many, pages 86-109.link Topic 5 Reading Questions ? Other Activity Lecture Notes Yes Yes Notes 10-16-07 Yes The role of science in food security In this section, we focus on agricultural productivity, scientific research, and technological innovation in the production of food.

Scientific innovations to be studied include improved crop varieties, agricultural chemicals, and biotechnology.4, Science and Food Security, pages 69-99.Topic 6 Reading Questions ? Other Activity Yes Lecture Notes Notes 10-21-08 The role of institutions in food security In this section, we focus on national and international institutions that affect agricultural research, international trade in food and other commodities, and domestic distribution of food.5, Hunger and Institutional Change, pages 101-131.Reading Questions ? Other Activity Lecture Notes Short Paper 1 due Yes Notes 10-23-08 Video: Black Gold.10/28 Topic 7 Midterm Exam Policy reforms for increasing food security To reduce world hunger, change must occur at national and international levels.In this section, we examine policies related to human capital, scientific research, water, and global governance.Date Read before class Reading Questions ? Other Activity Lecture Notes 8 10/30 11/4 Topic 8 Runge, Ch.

6, Policies and Institutions, pages 135-177.Timmer, The Macroeconomics of Food and Agriculture, pages 187-211.Yes Students assigned to countries and teams for Short Paper 2.Yes Notes 10-30-08 Notes 11-4-08 Food security in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa In this section, we focus on the two world regions where food insecurity has been the most severe.We pay particular attention to agricultural productivity, climate, water resources, and government policies that affect food security.

Date Read before class 11/6 Hazell, Green Revolution: Blessing or Curse? Pages 1-4.link 11/11 Veterans day – No class 11/13 Reardon, African Agriculture: Productivity and Sustainability Issues, pages 444-457.Rockefeller Foundation, Africa’s Turn: A New Green Revolution in the 21st Century, pages 110.link Topic 9 Reading Questions ? Yes Other Activity Video: Hidden Harvest Lecture Notes Notes 11-6-08 Yes Notes 11-13-08 Yes Food security in the United States In this section, we examine the extent, causes, and current remedies for hunger in the United States, where vibrant markets and enormous wealth are not enough to ensure food security for all.Date Read before class 11/18 Nord and Andrews, Putting Food on the Table: Household Food Security in the United States, Amber Waves, Vol.

link Topic 10 Date 11/20 11/25 11/27 Reading Questions ? Other Activity Yes Lecture Notes Notes 11-18-08 Practical steps for the elimination of hunger Implementing policies to increase food security will require substantial investment of resources and a change in national and global institutions.In this section, we examine the nature and magnitude of the changes required to eliminate hunger.

We consider proposals and contributions currently being made by various organizations.

To conclude the course, we return to the Hassan family in Bangladesh and consider their prospects for improved food security.7, Investing in a Hunger-Free World, pages 179-199.Thanksgiving break – No class Reading Questions ? Yes No Lecture Notes Notes 11-20-08 Yes No reading assignment 12/2 Other Activity Notes 11-25-08 Eating turkey Enjoy the day! Final draft of Short Paper 2 is due.No Notes 12-2-08 In-class Video: The Perfect Famine 12/4 Final Exam 9 Will be given during the last day of class l Spring 2007 Ohio State University AED Economics 531: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics 3:00pm-5:00pm MW, AA 0251 Instructor: Mark Partridge Office: Room 336, Agriculture Administration Phone #: 614-688-4907, email: email protected Office Hours: M-W 1 :45 to 2:45ish (we can then talk on the way to class) and by appointment.Teaching Assistant: Bill (Dongquan) Shen, email: shen.Carmen Website: Required Textbook: Ward, Frank A.

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.1st Edition, Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2006.Suggested Reading: The Wall Street Journal and the Economist (focus on sections that deal with economic and environmental issues).College is more than having a good time.It is also an excellent opportunity for you to understand the world around you.

In the global economy, and with good jobs hard to obtain, only a fool would not try to understand current events and the global economy.One of the ways you can differentiate yourself in the job market is by having a basic knowledge of the global players that you will be doing business with or competing against.Course Description: This course is designed to acquaint you to introductory environmental and natural resource economics.I teach the course expecting you have a good understanding of introductory principles of microeconomicse.Some of you may need to do some extra work on your own to get caught up.This course will assess the interaction between economics and the environment.We will discuss the impacts of human behavior on the environment and the use of natural resources.We will explore how various institutional arrangements including free markets affect environmental quality both concurrently and for future generations.

We will discuss optimal and efficient (lowest cost) ways to maximize societal well being.Various issues we will examine include pollution, climate change, and energy policy.I believe you will find that this course provides an excellent way to guide your thinking on the often challenging issues surrounding proper management of the environment and natural resource use.Evaluation and Grading: There are 2 in-class exams worth 90% of your grade in total.Home work will represent the remaining 10% of your grade.

The instructor welcomes and will reward classroom attendance (and participation is always appreciated).The professor will usually take attendance and will sometimes add attendance bonus points to the test scores (if the student is NOT tardy and STA YS the whole period.The bonus points are for good behavior, not good intentions.If you have other conflicts, you need to keep these rules in mind if you want to receive bonus points.Moreover, attendance bonus quizzes may be given on occasion where the bonus points will be added to the test scores.Each student is responsible to come to class and listen to announcements about any changes in the schedule.The instructor has no sympathy for those who only want to come to class on test days.Too often, such students miss key announcements and can even miss a test date if they miss a class announcement about a change in the test date (and receive a ZERO).The final grade will be determined as follows (all dates are subject to change and will 2 be announced at least one week in advance, where the last test day is intended to be the announced date in the official university schedule): 10 Exam I Exam II Homework Total 40% 50% 10% 100% Preparation for ClasslExams: May 2 (tentative) Monday June 4, at 1 :30pm to 3:18pm (note date in setting travel plans).

this test will have comprehensive elements Assigned in class with due dates set in class.All students are expected to complete the assigned readings prior to class.Also, if students read the material before class, the lectures will be clearer.Students are also responsible for all assigned reading material (whether or not it is covered in class).Likewise, students are responsible for all supplementary material covered in class, but not in the text (including handouts).

The tests will stress in-class discussion.This does not rule out test questions from the book which were not discussed in class.Extra Credit: There are no forms of extra credit.Make sure that you come in early in the semester for extra help on the material if you are having difficulty in the course.

Keep in mind that May 11 is the last day to withdraw from this course without petitioning.

IF YOU DO POORLY ON THE FIRST EXAM, YOU SHOULD PROBABLY DROP THE COURSE AND CUT YOUR LOSSES.Incomplete Grades: Incomplete grades are given only under the most incredibly extraordinary circumstances.Basically assume that they will not be given.Class Attendance/Participation: Attendance is optional except on test dates.However, your attendance is expected each time the class meets.

You are responsible for all materials covered in class regardless of whether it is in the textbook or not, and are responsible for all announcements made in class.If you do not come to lecture and you want to know if you missed anything in class, please consult: johnwhitehead.netlteaching/ for a list of my potential answers.Don't be surprised if the instructor calls on you in class!!!! Two purposes of this are to keep your attention and to find out what you know.One of the learning experiences that college offers is the opportunity to show individual responsibility.

If you do not come to class, it will be reflected in your final grade.It is unfortunate, but I have to put the following in writing.The instructor does not want people leaving in the middle of lecture without first discussing it with him and then sitting near the exit.Otherwise, it irritates the instructor and is distracting for everyone else (and you lose any bonus points) .If you think you may have the urge to leave early and do not want to discuss it with the instructor, please do not come to class that day.

Likewise, rather than sleeping in class, stay at home that day.Sleeping in class is disrespectful and you are not getting anything out of the lecture anyhow.Finally, please turn off your cell phone ringer when you are in class.It goes without saying how disruptive a ringing cell phone is during a class lecture.Academic Accommodations: 3 Any student who feels slbe may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact me privately to discuss your specific needs.

I do ask that, as a courtesy, students notify me at the beginning ofthe quarter of any accommodations required.University documentation should be provided to me no later than 5 days before the first examination so that proper accommodations can be arranged.Academic Misconduct (and cheating): Academic integrity is essential to maintaining an environment that fosters excellence in teaching, research, and other educational and scholarly activities.Thus, The Ohio State University and the Committee on 11 Academic Misconduct (COAM) expect that all students have read and understand the University's Code of Student Conduct, and that all students will complete all academic and scholarly assignments with fairness and honesty.Students must recognize that failure to follow the rules and guidelines established in the University's Code of Student Conduct and this syllabus may constitute "Academic Misconduct.

" The Ohio State University's Code of Student Conduct (Section 3335-23-04) defines academic misconduct as: "Any activity that tends to compromise the academic integrity of the University, or subvert the educational process." Examples of academic misconduct include (but are not limited to) plagiarism, collusion (unauthorized collaboration), copying the work of another student, and possession of unauthorized materials during an examination.Ignorance of the University's Code of Student Conduct is never considered an "excuse" for academic misconduct, so I recommend that you review the Code of Student Conduct and, specifically, the sections dealing with academic misconduct.If I suspect that a student has committed academic misconduct in this course, I am obligated by University Rules to report my suspicions to the Committee on Academic Misconduct.If COAM determines that you have violated the University's Code of Student Conduct (i.

, committed academic misconduct), the sanctions for the misconduct could include a failing grade in this course and suspension or dismissal from the University.If you have any questions about the above policy or what constitutes academic misconduct in this course, please contact me.Other sources of information on academic misconduct (integrity) include: • The Committee on Academic Misconduct web pages /coam/ • Ten Suggestions for Preserving Academic Integrity: /coam/ • Eight Cardinal Rules of Academic Integrity / The moral is: If you don't cheat, this should not be a problem/concern for you!! Thanks to Professor Roberts on this section .Suggestions and hints: • Please see me or the teaching assistant me if you need to make an appointment.

• Read the book! It is extremely stupid to pay hundreds of dollars for a course and fail the course because you do not read the book.If you do not want to read an economics book, then you should probably drop the course and save yourselftime, money, and effort.• There are hundreds of economics books in the library.If this text does not suit you, try another book.Ask questions in class before you fall behind and come to my or the TA's office hours if you need further help.• It is difficult to learn economics by only attending class and taking notes.I urge you to attempt problems, exercises, and outline your notes.4 AEDE 531, Spring 2007-Tentative Schedule The following is a tentative outline of course content, which may be a little more aggressive than what we will actually cover.

The only way to definitely find out what will be covered in the lectures is to come to class and listen to the class announcements.Moreover, the material covered on tests will be announced in class.We will try to get the power points posted on the Carmen webpage before the actual lecture, though we can't always promise this.26): Chapter 1: Course Introduction, Approaching Economics Chapter 2: Economic Thinking Chapter 3: Economic Theory Week 2: Chapter 3: Economic Theory Chapter 4: Institution Breakdown Week 3: 12 Chapter 5: Decision Support for Environmental Policies Chapter 6: Discount Rate Week 4: Chapter 6: Discount Rate Chapter 7: Valuing the Environment Week 5: Chapter 7: Valuing the Environment Week 6: Chapter 11: Food Chapter 13: Energy Week 7: Chapter 13: Energy Chapter 14: Population Week 8: Chapter 14: Population Chapter 15: Climate Change Week 9: Chapter 16: Environmental Quality and Pollution Week 10: Chapter 17: Environmental Risk Chapter 19: Sustainable Development Review if time permits Week 11: Final Exam The Ohio State University Colleges of the Arts and Sciences New Course Request International Studies Academic Unit International Studies Book 3 Listing (e.

, Portuguese) 565 Global Climate Change: Number Title Climate Economics Economic Implications and Opportunities UG 5 18-Character Title Abbreviation Level Credit Hours Summer Autumn Winter X Spring Year 2009 Proposed effective date, choose one quarter and put an "X" after it; and fill in the year.See the OAA curriculum manual for deadlines.Course Offerings Bulletin Information Follow the instructions in the OAA curriculum manual.

If this is a course with decimal subdivisions, then use one New Course Request form for the generic information that will apply to all subdivisions; and use separate forms for each new decimal subdivision, including on each form the information that is unique to that subdivision.If the course offered is less than a quarter or a term, please complete the Flexibly Scheduled/Off CampuslWorkshop Request form.Description (not to exceed 25 words): This course examines the economics of implications of climate change and climate policies for society, including discussion of major state, federal and international legislation.Quarter offered: Winter Distribution of class time/contact hours: 2 2hr classes 13 Quarter and contact/class time hours information should be omitted from Book 3 publication (yes or no): Yes Prerequisite(s): Aed Econ 200 or Econ 200 Exclusion or limiting clause: Not open to students with credit for Agricultural Economics 565 Repeatable to a maximum of NA credit hours.Cross-listed with: Agricultural Economics 565 Grade Option (Please check): Letter X S/U D Progress D What course is last in the series? Honors Statement: Yes D NoX GEC: Yes D No X Admission Conditions Course: Yes D NoX Off-Campus: Yes D NoX EM: Yes D No X Honors Enbedded Statement: Yes D NoX Service Learning Course: Yes D NoX Other General Course Information: (e.

" "Credit does not count toward BSBA degree.General Information Subject Code 010103 Subsidy Level (V, G, T, B, M, D, or P) M If you have questions, please email Jed Dickhaut at email protected 1.

Provide the rationale for proposing this course: See attachment.Please list Majors/Minors affected by the creation of this new course.Attach revisions of all affected programs.This course is (check one): D Required on major(s)/minor(s) D A choice on major(s)/minors(s) X An elective within major(s)/minor(s) D A general elective 3.

Indicate the nature of the program adjustments, new funding, andlor withdrawals that make possible the implementation of this new course.No program adjustments will be necessary.Is the approval of this request contingent upon the approval of other course requests or curricular reqests? Yes D No X List: 5.If this course is part of a sequence, list the number of the other course(s) in the sequence: --'-'N!!.

Expected Section Size: ---'3""'0"-- Proposed number of sections per year: --'- 7.Do you want prerequisites enforced electronically? (see OM manual for what can be enforced) Yes X No D 8.This course has been discussed with and has the concurrence of the following academic units needing this course or with academic units having directly related interests (List units and attach letters and/or forms): Not Applicable D College of Engineering, Geography, Economics (See Concurrence Letters Below) 9.Attach a course syllabus that includes a topical outline of the course, student learning outcomes andlor course objectives, off-campus field experience, methods of evaluation, and other items as stated in the OAA curriculum manual and e-mail to email protected CONTACT PERSON: Karlene Foster E-MAIL: - =s=te=r=.

,s The signatu on the lines in ALL CAPS ( e.Printed Name Date Anthony Mughan 08/12/08 3.After the Academic Unit Chair/Director signs the request, forward the form to the ASC Curriculum Office, 4132 Smith Lab, 174 West 18th Ave.

Attach the syllabus and any supporting documentation in an e-mail to email protected The ASC Curriculum Office will forward the request to the appropriate committee.COLLEGE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE Printed Name Date 6.ARTS AND SCIENCES EXECUTIVE DEAN Printed Name Date 7.

Graduate School (if appropriate) Printed Name Date 8.University Honors Center (if appropriate) Printed Name Date 9.Office of International Education (if appropriate) Printed Name Date 10.ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Printed Name Date Colleges of the Arts and Sciences Curriculum and Assessment Office, 4132 Smith Lab, 174 W.02/28/08 Global Climate Change: Economic Implications and Opportunities 14 Course Rationale Proposed to be cross-listed as AED Econ/lnternational Studies 565 Climate change is one of the most important global environmental and policy issues of our time.It has been argued that controlling climate change is the only way to prevent large-scale impacts on agricultural production, coastal zones, ecosystems, and weather.Controlling climate change, however, could be costly.

Finding policies and incentives that work to reduce the threat of potentially large-scale alterations to the global climate system will require the efforts of government, business, and society-at-Iarge.This course is designed to examine a wide range of economic and policy issues involved in the debate over controlling greenhouse gases climate change.The course begins with a global view of the implications of population growth, rising incomes, and technology change on the demand for energy.We then trace out the potential implications of climate change on important sectors of the global economy, including the agricultural sector, water resources, and coastal communities.Given emerging concerns that climate change is inevitable no matter what actions society undertakes, a section of the course will focus on how markets facilitate or impede adaptation, and how incentives can be designed to encourage adaptive behavior in the private and public sector.

We turn next to the business of mitigation.Many of the voluntary systems that already are in place to encourage mitigation among consumers and businesses are reviewed, including the development of carbon offsets, green engineering, and green accounting.The course then examines how carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems could be implemented in the US, using examples from within the U., sulfur dioxide trading), and from around the world (e.the European system for carbon trading, ETS).Both voluntary and compulsory climate change mitigation actions reveal a number of business opportunities for the future.

The last section of the course considers the actions state and national policy makers are taking in the U., and the relationship of these actions to international agreements, including the Kyoto Protocol.By the end of the course, students should be able to: • Understand how population, income growth, and technology change influence the demand for energy and its implications for climate change.• Recognize current thinking on how climate influences food production, the distribution of water resources, and coastal infrastructure, and how climate change may affect these sectors.

• Recognize how markets impede or enhance adaptation and adaptive capacity in food production, water resources, and coastal infrastructure.• Formulate and evaluate policies intended to encourage adaptation to climate change.• Understand how voluntary and compUlsory actions encourage mitigation of climate change.• Understand how carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems work.laws and international treaties related to climate change.• Evaluate alternative state and national policies for climate change mitigation and understand how these actions relate to international policies like the Kyoto Protocol.AEDEIIS 565 Global Climate Change: Economic Implications and Opportunities Winter 2009 Instructor Brent Sohngen 322 Agr Admin Bldg Phone: 688-4640 E-mail: email protected Teaching Assistant TBA Office Hours: Dr.Sohngen will announce office hours the first week of class.

Students are encouraged to set up a separate appointment with Dr.Sohngen if they cannot meet during that time.The teaching assistant will schedule regular office hours and you are encouraged to "drop in" during those hours.Reading Materials: No book will be assigned for this class.A course reading packet will be available with readings below.Most readings are available on-line, and students can feel free to obtain them by searching on their own.Objectives: At the completion of the course, the student will be able to: • Understand how population, income growth, and technology change influence the demand for energy and its implications for climate change.• Recognize current thinking on how climate influences food production, the distribution of water resources, and coastal infrastructure, and how climate change may affect these sectors.

15 • Recognize how markets impede or enhance adaptation and adaptive capacity in food production, water resources, and coastal infrastructure.• Formulate and evaluate policies intended to encourage adaptation to climate change.• Understand how voluntary and compulsory actions encourage mitigation of climate change.• Understand how carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems work.laws and international treaties related to climate change.• Evaluate alternative state and national policies for climate change mitigation and understand how these actions relate to international policies like the Kyoto Protocol.Prerequisites: AED Econ 200 or Economics 200 Course Requirements Case studies: There will be three case studies in the course.The case studies will require reading and preparing answers to several questions in advance of the class in which the case is discussed.

Students are expected to participate during the case study and to turn-in their written answers to the case study questions after the class period.Students will be graded on their written answers and their participation during the case study.Exams: There will be a midterm and a fmal exam.The midterm will occur after the fifth week, and the final will occur during fmals week.Final Paper~ A paper is required for this course and will be due the 9th week of classes.

For the paper, students are expected to write a 15 page essay on one of several topics.The essay should be double-spaced, with 12 point font, I" top and bottom margins and 1.Several candidate topics are given below, and a full list will be provided at the beginning of class.Students can use their own topic with permission of the instructor.

Potential topics include: • Technology change in the energy sector will (or will not) be strong enough to ultimately reduce carbon emissions and avoid the problems of climate change.• The impacts of climate change on the agricultural sector will imperil food security in developing countries.• Ensuring that trade is free can alleviate the effects of climate change by shifting food resources from countries with ample production to those with limited production.• Governments must act sooner rather than later to begin adaptation of coastal infrastructure that is susceptible to sea-level rise.• Mandatory action on climate change is necessary because voluntary actions will never be enough to slow global warming.

II There are many good investment opportunities today in early actors, e., the companies that are developing new products to mitigate climate change.II Recent legislation in California to counteract carbon emissions (AB 32) will be a successful law that helps the world avoid climate change.For the paper, students are expected to state a question, and to use current scientific information discussed in class and obtained through their own independent research to argue their answer to the question.

The topics listed above have been written in question format.When writing the paper, students are required to cite literature.Class readings are fair game to be cited in the paper, however, students must do additional research on their own.Papers must contain at least 10 new citations that are not part of the course material.Citations can be obtained from scientific journals, popular press articles, and articles published in the internet, or blogs.

The relevance of each citations must be clearly shown in the text of the paper, and all citations must be clearly documented in a bibliography at the end of the paper.We will discuss proper citation in class.Climate science and policy is still evolving and there are well reasoned yes and no answers available in the literature already to nearly all of the questions in the list above.In order to make your points, you will need to examine evidence you can find in the literature, and describe why you believe the evidence you have read leads you to your answer.

As we will discuss in class, this is essentially the method used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change when they assess the state of climate change science every 5 years.Grading of the paper will depend on the logic of your arguments (60%), proper use of english (20%), and your use of citations (20%).Course Grades: Case Studies Midterm Paper Final Total Grading Scale: 16 A 96-100 A- 90-95 B+ 87-89 B 83-86 B- 80-82 Topics and readings (by week): (1) Climate change fundamentals Readings: C+ C CD+ D 30% (10% each) 20% 25% 25% 77-79 73-76 70-72 67-69 60-65 100% E <60 II Chapter 1 in Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 4th Assessment Report, Report of Working Group I: "The Physical Science Basis." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (pp.

93-121) II Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 4th Assessment Report, Working Group I, Summary for Policy Makers (pp 1- 18) (2) Population, income, and technology effects on the energy sector Readings: II Chapters 1-3 in Clarke et al.

"Scenarios of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Atmospheric Concentrations, Synthesis and Assessment Produce 2.(3) Climate change impacts on agriculture and food security Readings: II Chapter 5 in Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 4th Assessment Report, Report of Working Group II: "Impacts Adaptation and Vulnerability.

" Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (pp."Weathering Global Warming in Agriculture and Forestry: It Can Be Done With Free Markets." Civil Society Report on Climate Change, pp.(4) Climate change impacts on water resources and coastal communities Readings: III Chapter 3 in Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 4th Assessment Report, Report of Working Group II: "Impacts Adaptation and Vulnerability." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (pp.

174-210) III Chapter 6 in Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 4th Assessment Report, Report of Working Group II: "Impacts Adaptation and Vulnerability." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (pp.316-356) Exam 1: Covers Sections 1-4 (5) Can we adapt? Market and policy incentives."The Role of Markets and Governments in Helping Society Adapt to a Changing Climate."Reflections on the Economics of Climate Change.

" Journal of Economic Perspectives, 7(4): 11-25."Scenarios of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Atmospheric Concentrations, Synthesis and Assessment Produce 2."Climate Policy Design Under Uncertainty." Chapter 25 in Human Induced Climate 17 Change, an Interdisciplinary Assessment, edited by M.

(7) Mitigation Policy: Voluntary incentives, carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems.Readings: III Chapter 7 in "Natural Resource Economics, An Introduction," by Barry C.

"Climate Change 101: Cap and Trade" III Capoor and Ambrosi 2007, State and Trends of the Carbon Market 2007.Exam 2: Covers Sections 5-7 (8) Emerging business opportunities Case Study in Class: Chicago Climate Exchange Readings: III Case Study 1: "Lightening the Load: Reducing Costs and Emissions While Maintaining Performance at Staples." World Resources Institute, Climate Northeast Project.III Case Study 2: "Purchasing Green Power in Competitive Markets: Citigroup's Experience." World Resources Institute, Climate Northeast Project.

11 October 2007 (published online) (9) US climate policy: State level actions and emerging federal regulation Case Study in Class: Designing a Us.Cap and Trade System Readings: III Pew Center on Climate Change."Climate Change 101: Cap and Trade" III We will also review recent updates on legislative initiatives before Congress.Readings to be announced and provided during class.(10) International agreements: Kyoto and Post-Kyoto Case Study in Class: What's Should Come After the Kyoto Protocol? Readings: • Chapter 13 in Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 4th Assessment Report, Report of Working Group III: "Mitigation of Climate Change.

" Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (pp.746-807) Credit for case studies requires your attendance.Documented illness, death in the family, or other extreme circumstances are the only excused absences.Make-up midterm exams will be given only in the event of excused absences.Academic Misconduct It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.

The term "academic misconduct" includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( studentaffairs.Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; /.DEPARTMENTAL COURSE REVIEW CONCURRENCE FORM The purpose of this form is to provide a simple system of obtaining departmental reactions to proposed new courses, group studies, study tours, workshop requests, and course changes.A letter may be substituted for this form.

Academic units initiating a request which requires such a reaction should complete Section A of this form and send a copy of the form, course request, and syllabus to each of the academic units that might have related interests in the course.Initiating units should allow at least two weeks for responses.18 Academic units receiving this form should response to Section 8 and return the form to the initiating unit.Overlap of course content and other problems should be resolved by the academic units before forwarding this form and all other accompanying documentation to the Office of Academic Affairs.Initiating Academic Unit: AED Econ Date: 5/27/08 Registrar's Listing: AED Econ Course Number: 565 Level: U 3J P D G 3J Credit Hours: 05 Course Title: Global Climate Change: Economic Implications and Opportunities Type of Request: 8J New Course D Group Studies DWorkshop DStudy Tour DCourse Change Academic Units with related interests asked to review the request: Geography, Economics, SENR, John Glenn School of Public Affairs, Math and Physical Sciences, Bio Sci, FABE/ENG Date responses are needed: 6/6/08 B.

Information from academic units reviewing the request: xD The academic unit supports the proposal o The academic unit does not support the proposal.Please explain: D The academic unit suggests: Robert J.Gustafson, Associate Dean, College of Engineering Signature of Department Chair Signature of Graduate Studies Chair (if applicable) From: email protected mailto: email protected On Behalf Of Becky Mansfield Sent: Monday, June 09,20082:57 PM To: Susie Sheller Subject: Re: New Course Request for AED Econ-Intl.Studies 565 Susie, I am writing to give Geography's concurrence to the proposed AEDE/lnternational Studies course "Global Climate Change: Economic Implications and Opportunities." The course would be an excellent complement to the several courses that we offer that address climate change from geographical perspectives.

Sorry not to have gotten back to you sooner.Becky On Tue, May 27, 2008 at 3 :33 PM, Susie Sheller wrote: Becky Mansfield Department of Geography, Ohio State University 1036 Derby Hall, 154 N Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 ph: 614-247-7264, fax: 614-292-6213, email protected /faculty/bmansfield/web/ From: Masanori Hashimoto mailto: email protected Sent: Wednesday, June 04,2008 10:56 AM To: Susie Sheller Subject: Re: Fwd: Reminder: New Course Request for AED Econ-Intl.Studies 565 We concur with this proposal.

Masanori :Hashimoto Professor and Chairyerson and :Honors 'Director 'Deyartment Of 'Economics The Ohio State 'University 410 .Jtrys :HaCC 1945 :North :High Street CoCumbus, Ohio 43210-1172 (614) 292-4196 office (614) 292-3906:f.Email: : email protected Date: Mon, 02 Jun 2008 10:03: 16 -0400 >128.

78 >Date: Tue, 05 Aug 2008 14:16:42 -0400 >To: email protected , email protected >From: email protected >Subject: AGR AED ECON Course # 565.Available for Scheduling >X-Spam-Score: 0.50) NO REAL NAME >X-CanItPRO-Stream: 11 tagonly no subject >X-Canit-Stats-ID: Bayes signature not available >X-Scanned-By: CanIt ( ) on 128.81 > >The Scheduling Office has entered the following into the course >catalog: AGR AED ECON course # 565 .> >The course is now available for you have any questions >about the scheduling process, please contact the University Registrar >Office via email at: > > email protected >NOTE: This is a system generated email message.

Please do not reply >directly to this message.ff rc!" «- cl SYLLABUS AED Economics 280 (call number 00232-6) and International Studies 280 (call number 12125-0) “Feast or Famine: The Global Business of Food” Five Credit Hours, Winter 2008 Time and Location: 9:30 to 11:18, Mondays and Wednesdays Room 209, Campbell Hall Instructor Professor Douglas Southgate Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics Room 329, Agricultural Administration Building 2120 Fyffe Road, 292-2432, email protected 20 Teaching Assistant Michael Betz, Department of AED Economics 317 Agr.Secretary Susie Sheller, Department of AED Economics 240 Agr., 292-6432, email protected Course Content This course, for which there is no prerequisite, addresses trends in the consumption and production of food.

Specific objectives reflect a general focus on the allocation of edible commodities and the resources used to produce same.• • • • • • To understand population dynamics of relevance to food demand.To relate changes in food demand to improvements in living standards.To examine the impacts of technological improvement both on agriculture and on the human and natural resources harnessed for crop and livestock production.To apply the concept of scarcity to the study of trends in food prices.

To relate trade and specialization to improved living standards, generally, and the alleviation of hunger, specifically.To appreciate that performance of the food economy depends on historical antecedents, environmental conditions, and other factors that vary from one part of the world to another.21 GEC AEDE/IS 280 is a GEC course that has the following goals and objectives.Diversity: International Issues Goals/rationale: International issues courses help students become educated, productive, and principled citizens of their nation and world.Learning objectives: Students exhibit an understanding of political, economic, cultural, physical, and social differences among the nations of the world, including a specific examination of non-Western cultures.

Social Science Goals/rationale: Courses in social science help students understand human behavior and cognition and the structures of human societies, cultures, and institutions.Learning objectives: Students understand the theories and methods of scientific inquiry as these are applied to the study of individuals, groups, organizations, and societies.Students comprehend human differences and similarities in various social, cultural, economic, geographic, and political contexts.Students develop abilities to comprehend and assess individual and social values, and recognize the importance of same in social problem-solving and policy-making.The subject matter of this course addresses the third (of three) social-science category in the GEC – Human, Natural, and Economic Resources - which deals with the use, distribution, allocation, exchange, and other aspects of decisionmaking related to land and other environmental resources as well as human resources.

Public policies influencing this decision-making are a key focus, as is global interdependence.Grading Twenty percent of the course grade will be based on the midterm examination, which will take place during the sixth week of the quarter.Another 30 percent will reflect performance on the final examination, which will be held during finals week.Both tests will comprise true-false and fill-in-the-blank questions.The other 50 percent of the grade will be based on a term paper, which is the subject of a separate handout.

The grading scale for this course follows.>92% 90-92% 88-90% 82-88% A AB+ B 80-82% 78-80% 72-78% 70-72% BC+ C C- 68-70% D+ 60-68% D <60% E 22 Policies Due Dates.As explained in the handout on the writing assignment, points will be deducted for late submissions without a proper excuse.Likewise, a proper excuse is needed to take an examination before or after the scheduled date.

At various times, including perhaps twice during the same class session, attendance will be taken.Any student who is absent without an excuse (e., note from a medical clinic, obituary notice for a relative who has passed away, etc.) when the roll it taken on three or more occasions will have his or her class grade lowered by 10 percentage points.

Attendance will be posted on the class web page.It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term, “academic misconduct,” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed – illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connections with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty rule 3335-487).

For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct at: /info for students/ .Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office of Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office of disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue.Textbook Douglas Southgate, Douglas Graham, and Luther Tweeten.Topical Outline and Reading Assignments Week 1 Introduction.“Population, Food, and Knowledge” American Economic Review 90:1, pp.

Weeks 3&4 How agricultural output is increased.The introduction of hybrid crops in the United States.

Environmental consequences of agricultural development.Agribusiness’s Role in the Food Economy.Projections for the twenty-first century.Week 6 Synopsis of regional trends in the global food economy.March 12th Final Examination, 9:30 to 11:18.

24 SYLLABUS AED Economics 280 (call number 00232-6) and International Studies 280 (call number 12125-0) “Feast or Famine: The Global Business of Food” Five Credit Hours, Winter 2008 Time and Location: 9:30 to 11:18, Mondays and Wednesdays Room 209, Campbell Hall Instructor Professor Douglas Southgate Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics Room 329, Agricultural Administration Building 2120 Fyffe Road, 292-2432, email protected Teaching Assistant Michael Betz, Department of AED Economics 317 Agr.Secretary Susie Sheller, Department of AED Economics 240 Agr.

, 292-6432, email protected Course Content This course, for which there is no prerequisite, addresses trends in the consumption and production of food.Specific objectives reflect a general focus on the allocation of edible commodities and the resources used to produce same.• • • • • • To understand population dynamics of relevance to food demand.

To relate changes in food demand to improvements in living standards.To examine the impacts of technological improvement both on agriculture and on the human and natural resources harnessed for crop and livestock production.To apply the concept of scarcity to the study of trends in food prices.To relate trade and specialization to improved living standards, generally, and the alleviation of hunger, specifically.To appreciate that performance of the food economy depends on historical antecedents, environmental conditions, and other factors that vary from one part of the world to another.

25 GEC AEDE/IS 280 is a GEC course that has the following goals and objectives.Diversity: International Issues Goals/rationale: International issues courses help students become educated, productive, and principled citizens of their nation and world.Learning objectives: Students exhibit an understanding of political, economic, cultural, physical, and social differences among the nations of the world, including a specific examination of non-Western cultures.Social Science Goals/rationale: Courses in social science help students understand human behavior and cognition and the structures of human societies, cultures, and institutions.Learning objectives: Students understand the theories and methods of scientific inquiry as these are applied to the study of individuals, groups, organizations, and societies.

Students comprehend human differences and similarities in various social, cultural, economic, geographic, and political contexts.Students develop abilities to comprehend and assess individual and social values, and recognize the importance of same in social problem-solving and policy-making.The subject matter of this course addresses the third (of three) social-science category in the GEC – Human, Natural, and Economic Resources - which deals with the use, distribution, allocation, exchange, and other aspects of decisionmaking related to land and other environmental resources as well as human resources.Public policies influencing this decision-making are a key focus, as is global interdependence.

Grading Twenty percent of the course grade will be based on the midterm examination, which will take place during the sixth week of the quarter.

Another 30 percent will reflect performance on the final examination, which will be held during finals week.Both tests will comprise true-false and fill-in-the-blank questions.The other 50 percent of the grade will be based on a term paper, which is the subject of a separate handout.The grading scale for this course follows.>92% 90-92% 88-90% 82-88% A AB+ B 80-82% 78-80% 72-78% 70-72% BC+ C C- 68-70% D+ 60-68% D <60% E 26 Policies Due Dates.

As explained in the handout on the writing assignment, points will be deducted for late submissions without a proper excuse.Likewise, a proper excuse is needed to take an examination before or after the scheduled date.At various times, including perhaps twice during the same class session, attendance will be taken.Any student who is absent without an excuse (e.

, note from a medical clinic, obituary notice for a relative who has passed away, etc.) when the roll it taken on three or more occasions will have his or her class grade lowered by 10 percentage points.Attendance will be posted on the class web page.It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term, “academic misconduct,” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed – illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connections with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty rule 3335-487).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct at: /info for students/ .Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office of Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office of disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue.Textbook Douglas Southgate, Douglas Graham, and Luther Tweeten.Topical Outline and Reading Assignments Week 1 Introduction.

“Population, Food, and Knowledge” American Economic Review 90:1, pp.Weeks 3&4 How agricultural output is increased.The introduction of hybrid crops in the United States.Environmental consequences of agricultural development.

Agribusiness’s Role in the Food Economy.Projections for the twenty-first century.

Week 6 Synopsis of regional trends in the global food economy.March 12th Final Examination, 9:30 to 11:18.28 Agricultural Systems Management (AGSYSMGT) 370: Principles of Hydrology Fall Quarter 2008 Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering Department M, W 11:30 - 12:48 pm, Room 103 INSTRUCTORS: Dr.Andy Ward, Room 230b, Agricultural Engineering Building, Phone - 292-9354; E-mail - email protected Vinayak Shedekar, Room 250, E-mail email protected TEXT: Environmental Hydrology (2nd Edition).

Andy Ward and Stan Trimble Date Sept 24 .Subject Introduction & Hydrologic Cycle (PPT 1) 29 Oct.1 USGS Discharge Methods (PPT 6) Topographic Map & Watershed Boundary (PPT 4) V A Stream Geomorphology (PPT 2) Stream Geomorphology (PPT 2 & 3) A A 6 8 Instructor Note AV Work on H1 13 V 15 Team Project-Topographic Map & Watershed Boundary Open Channel Flow (PPT 5) 20 22 Open Channel Flow (PPT 5) Landscape Runoff Methods (PPT 6) V V H1 due V Work on H2 & proj.3 5 Team Project Game Show Review AV A Project Part A due MID-TERM EXAMINATION Soil Physics and Infiltration (PPT 7) V AV H3 due 10 12 Precipitation (PPT 9) Soil Erosion (PPT 8) V V 17 19 Soil Erosion (PPT 8) Team Project V V Work on Proj.1 ET (PPT 10) Team Project Reservoir Systems V AV A H5 due Project Part B due 29 3 Human impacts on the hydrologic cycle (PPT 11) A 11 FINAL EXAM V A Andy 11:30 - 1:18 PM V Vinayak Objectives: The general objectives of this course are that students will: (a) acquire fundamental knowledge of hydrologic processes; (b) apply this knowledge to solving single-objective and simple multi-objective problems; (c) demonstrate good comprehension and synthesis of this knowledge by working in a team environment to solving a real-world design problem.Specific learning objectives are that students will: 1 Acquire an understanding of agricultural and forest hydrology with an emphasis on the application of this knowledge to small watersheds and agricultural systems.

2 Recognize the relationships among the many factors in the hydrologic cycle, and employ this knowledge to use qualitative reasoning and numerical calculations to solve problems.3 Evaluate physical, chemical and biological processes which impact on hydrologic systems.4 Learn to work together in small teams to solve a real world problem.5 Synthesis the knowledge acquired in this course to solve a real world problem.

6 Prepare a written technical report that involves scientific judgement and an evaluation of the economic, social, political, and/or environmental impacts of the project.

Assignments: Homework assignments are due by 10:00 am (start of class) on the dates indicated unless the deadline is extended by the instructor.A no penalty extension of 48 hours will be provided once and only for a homework assignment.Team Projects: Part A is due by 10:00 am on October 29 and Part B is due by 10:00 am on December 1 unless a deadline is extended by the instructor.A late penalty of 10% per day (or part of a day) will be assessed for projects that are not submitted on time.Do any combination of 1 to 5 that total 1000 points.

Homework Assignments (100 points each) 2.Final Examination TOTAL (The sum of 1+2+3+4+ 5 maximum score) Plus Extra Credit and class activities Maximum Points 500 100 100 300 0-300 1000 0-50 Note: You need to do AT LEAST ALL homework assignments, Part A and Part B of the team project, and the midterm examination.Midterm will be 30% of your grade and the Final will be 30% of your grade.Provided it improves your grade, your score on the Final Examination will replace one of the 30 following: (1) one or two of the graded homework assignments that have the lowest scores; or (2) the value of the Midterm Examination.For (1) the Final exam scores will be converted to 100 or 200 point scale.Grading: Letter grades will be determined as follows: A = 930+ points A- = 900 - 929 B+ = 870 - 899 B = 830 - 869 C+ = 770 - 799 C = 730 - 769 D+ = 670 - 699 D = 600 - 669 B- = 800 - 829 C- = 700 - 729 E = 0 - 599 Pollution Control and Waste Utilization Agricultural Systems Management 550 Syllabus - Spring Qtr.

2008 Official Course Description Management and utilization of animal wastes, fertilizers, pesticides, crop residues, milk, and food processing, and farmstead and urban solid wastes to abate environmental pollution at the urban-rural interface.Quarters of Offering Credits Supervisors Sp 3 Level Class Meeting Pattern UG 3 cl Course Mancl, Rowan Class Hours and Location • Tuesday 1-hour lecture (4:30-5:18 pm) and Thursday 2-hour lecture/field lab (4:30-6:18 pm) • Agricultural Engineering Building, room 148 Instructors Dr., phone: 292-6007, e-mail: email protected Dr., phone: 688-5543, e-mail: email protected , TA Office: Agr.

Email: email protected Course Prerequisites 31 None, but it will be helpful to have some background in basic biology, chemistry, and physics.Required Textbooks Zipnotes Livestock Waste Facilities Handbook - 1985 (MWPS-18, 2nd ed.) OSU Extension Bulletins*: Mound Systems for On-site Wastewater Treatment - 2004 (OSUE Bulletin.

813) Mound Systems: Pressure Distribution of Wastewater - 2004 (OSUE Bulletin.829) Septage Management in Ohio - 1995 (OSUE Bulletin 854) Reuse of Reclaimed Wastewater through Irrigation - 1997 (OSUE Bulletin.860) Sand Bioreactors for Wastewater Treatment for Ohio Communities- 1999 (Bulletin 876) The Composting Process – 1995 (OSUE Bulletin 792) Ohio Livestock Manure & Wastewater Management Guide - 1992 (Bulletin.604) Onsite Sprinkler Irrigation of Treated Wastewater – 2004 (Bulletin 912) Suitability of Ohio Soils for Treating Wastewater – 2002 (Bulletin 896) Soil and Site Evaluation – 2005 (Bulletin 905) Guidelines for Livestock Operations * Note: all OSUE bulletins are available on the world wide web at: /lines/ #BULLS Reserve Textbook Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems - 1994 (B.Minnis) Course Objectives Upon completion of this course, the students will know: • Physical, chemical and biological treatment processes that use the soil as a treatment and disposal medium, renovate wastes that are high in animal fat and vegetable oil content, stabilize high strength wastewaters that runoff animal feedlots, and discharge from milking, and egg, fruit and vegetable washing operations, and recycle manures, sludges and septage as soil amendments.• Siting and operational limitations, such as: soil depth and permeability, variable waste flows in resort and recreational areas, limited skilled labor for plant operation, and energy conservation for remote and religious (Amish schools, for example) facilities.• Regulatory, political and community acceptance issues involving: coordination of local and state health, environmental and natural resource agencies, decision making processes in small communities, businesses and agricultural operations, and strategies for community involvement and self-help.

Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to: 32 • Plan management and monitoring of: small community on-site and cluster wastewater treatment systems, manure composting and digestion systems, and dairy, egg, meat, and vegetable processing waste treatment and land application systems.• Read soil surveys and test reports to: determine appropriate manure, and septage application rates to agricultural fields consider siting of septic tank-soil absorption systems, mound systems, and lagoons, and make operational adjustments in anaerobic lagoons and digesters, and small wastewater treatment systems.• Determine appropriate chemical additions to: stabilize septage, manures and sludges, coagulate solids in domestic, agricultural and food processing wastewaters, and disinfect wastes and wastewaters applied and discharged to golf courses, parks, woodlots and agricultural sites.Topics This course will cover management of a range of wastes: • Wastewater from individual homes & small groups of homes • High strength wastewaters from restaurants and food processing plants • Manures, sludge and septage See the course schedule for a full list of topics.Assessments: Team Project/Practicum A team project or practicum will be assigned to all students.

Each team will be assigned a different waste source (e., dairy, small community, food processing industry, restaurant, confined livestock facility, etc.Each team member will work on all aspect of the overall project as a part of homework assignments.

A poster will be developed for in-class presentation of the team’s findings.Each student is expected to present a visible contribution to the team project Homework and lab reports 1.Each problem will include GIVEN information, additional information to FIND, and a SKETCH (if appropriate) of the situation or facility.Students must list all assumptions, cite all references, and show work neatly.The ability to organize, document, and logically present answers will be considered in grading.Students must turn in their own individual contribution to the team project.Appropriate point deductions will be made for homework that turned in late.

One 1-class period delay will be allowed once during the 33 quarter if requested in person or in writing at the time the assignment is due.Homework must be turned in at the beginning of class.A homework box will be set up at class to collect homework.No homework will be accepted outside of class.

Attendance and Conduct Policies Consistent and on-time attendance is expected and will be noted throughout the course.If any problems arise relative to attendance, please contact the instructors immediately.You are encouraged to participate in class, ask questions, and share your experiences relative to the subjects and discussion that day.Everyone is expected to adhere to the Rules and Regulations of the Ohio State University, and, in particular, to the Rules on Academic Misconduct.

Tests All tests will be open book and open notes.Disabilities Students with disabilities are encouraged to register.Consult privately with instructor to make arrangements.Grading Grades will be based on your final standing against OSU’s standard grade scale (i.The weighting of the individual elements in the grading scale will be decided by class consensus.Each blank in the table below must be at least 10% of the total 100%.The first day of class, you will select the % weights and fill in the following table: Homeworks/lab reports Team project Midterm Final exam Total 30 % 20 % (poster presentation) 25 % 25 % 100 % Graduate students and undergraduate students will be graded separately.Graduate students will have an additional project weighted at 20 points.The topic of this project is current topics in wastewater and waste management.

Graduate student grades will be determined for a 120 point total.For Graduate Credit: 34 For each of the 8 assignments attach an article about wastewater or waste management from a local newspaper.For each article answer the following questions.How common is this problem? Is it only an issue in Ohio, the US or is it a world-wide issue? 2.

How could the technologies we have studied in class be used to address this problem or issue? 3.Do policies, procedures, regulations or laws need to be changed to correct this problem or issue? Graduate students will be a part of 2 teams: 1 will be an in-class team to develop a waste management plan.The other will be a graduate team to present current issues in wastewater and waste management.The graduate students will work together to present a poster on current issues at the poster session.HUMAN ECOLOGICAL ADAPTATIuNS Prof Jeffrey K McKee Department of Anthropology Anthropology 411 01431-5 Autumn, 2008 T-R 1IJ:30- 2: 8, BolzH?1l 31·d Phone 292-2745 (0), 740-657-8494 (H) e-mail: email protected Office Hours: Tuesday 12:30-130, Thursday1230-230 and by appointment 4068 Smith Laboratory 0\/ ~R\i'TE\V: This course focuses on the interacti'.

-'e relationships betvveen and their environnlents, past and present.Starting vvith an evolutionary' ptfSpedive, the ecological forces earliest kno\vn hnrmnid ancestors This ieads to a study of modern hurnan adaptations of morphology and physiology, as well as the role of material culture in the growth of the human population.Demographic considerations will be covered in some detail, including the possible effects on OUf adaptability.Today hunlans shape their own envirol11nents, affecting the conditions of natural selection and ongoing evolution of our species.

\Ve vvill study ho~v our unique ecological role is important in determining disease vectors and our adaptations to disease.

onclude with a theoretical look at possible scenarios for fLlture hUlnan ecological adaptations and impacts.OBJECTI\iES The swdents should become familiar wirh the place of humans in naIllre and nature's place in humans.They will be expected to have a basic grasp of the conditions of human L.

)' (~f "L AdditIonal reqU1rea readmgs are llSTect on tI1e syllabus.Further outside readings from recenT 35 articles and/or \veb sites \vi1l be recoi11mended TO keep up to date v

EXaIIlS will cover both lecture Hlflterial and readings on the syllabus.An assigned essay ,",vortn 20~/o of the total wiU be based on an assessment of issues in the current academic literature; it will be a minimum of ten typed pages, and include at least 5 references from sources other than the regular assigned readings.Grading percentages: Final grades ,",vil1 be distributed as fonow~s: A 92-1 no; A- 90-91 ~ B+ 88-89; B 82-87; B- 80-81; C+ 78-79; C 72-77; C- 70-71; D+ 68-69; D 60-67; E<60.Stlldents with disabilities are responsible for making their needs known to the instructor, and are examination.Academic lvfiscondllct: All students should become familiar with the mles governing alleged academic misconduct.

All students should be familiar with what constitutes academic misconduct, especially as it pertains to plagiarism and test taking.Ignorance of the rules governing academic misconduct or ignorance of what constitutes acadenlic 111isconduct is not an acceptahle defense Alleged cases of academic misconduct are referred to the proper Ciass Canceilations: In case of unexpected instructor absences the information will be posted on the foliowing departmental website.This site should be consulted during inclement weather to check for possible class cancellations or delays.Do not call the department, check the website anthropology.php ed Term Paper Grades: In case of a dispute concerning a term paper grade, the student is encouraged to meet with the instmctor to reconcile the matter.At that time, the student must present notes llsed in writing the paper, earlier drafis and copies of bibliographic material cited.This course is a core course in the Evohltionar:v Studies rninor".Information regarding the minor and its requirements may be round online at /interdisciolinary IntrDductiDn 9/25 - The human place in nature and nature's place in hur11an5.

Persrce~:tive5 of Evohationary Eco~ogy 9130 - Historical perspectives.10/2 - A convenient film Reading: Konnondy & BroVv"D Chapters 1, 2.:> Evolutionary Ecolog-y of the Hom;n;ns 10/7 - Hominin origins in African environments.10/9 - Early hominin adaptations and adaptability Reading: Kormondy & Brown Chapter 12.

4 Homo sapiens bionnltural a~hlptations 1 (Ill A ~o,"""·~.10/16 - Biological and cultural adaptations to new biomes.5 10/21- Ecological & development adaptations of morphology and physiology.10123- Ecological & developmental adaptionsofmorphology and physiology II.

8 - ~\t!idterm eX!1ill (covers lectures readings from 'Nee!';:5 1-5.7 The "ecologica! transition" 11/4 - Human survival and subsistence choices.VOTEI 1116 - Domestication of other life forms.Readmr;: Kormondy & Brown Chapters II, 14, 16.

Essavs assigned (Essays drawn from scientific literature in consultation with lecturer) 36 8 PestHenre 11111 - Adaptations to disease.! 1/13 - Adaptations to designed environments.10 11/18 - Human D01)ulation gro'vvth since t.11120 - Environmental carrying capacity, and film Reading: KO(nlondy & Brown Chapters 4, 5; l'v"1cKee Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4.Science 162: 1243-1248 /cgilcontent/fuI1l162/3859/1243 10 Human disease and future popUlations.t on \vild populations 11127 - NO CLASS (Thanksgiving) Reading: McKee Chapters 5, 6.12/4 - Demographic, ecological and evolutionary projections.REVIEW Reading: Kormondy & Brown Chapter 18; McKee Chapters 7,8,9.i1 (Ct)\/ers all work, focusing l1n 'Ii'ieeks 7-1 j) The Ohio State University Anthropology 602.03 Environmental Archaeology Winter Quarter, 2009 Instructor Prof.

Yerkes Room 4008 Smith Lab Phone: 292-1328 Office Hours Tues.&Thurs: 11:30 AM- 1:00 PM E-mail: email protected Class Hours Tues.& Thurs: 9:30-11:18 AM 4012 Smith Laboratory 174 West 18th Avenue COURSE SYLLABUS Required Texts: (1) The Analysis of Animal Bones from Archeological Sites, (1984) by Richard G.Klein and Kathryn Cruz-Uribe, University of Chicago Press.

(2) The Archaeology of Animals, (1995) by Simon J.Press (3) Several articles available via Carmen This course is a core course in the Evolutionary Studies minor.Information regarding the minor and its requirements may be found online at /interdisciplinary.

Course Goals: To study the relationship between humans and their environment in the past.

After a review of method and theory in environmental archaeology and zooarchaeology, we will outline the methods that are used to reconstruct the past environments, subsistence practices, and settlement 37 systems of hunter-gatherers and agricultural societies.We will examine samples of faunal remains from a prehistoric site in the New World, and interpret the results.Class Format: Students will meet for two periods on Tuesdays and Thursdays.When we meet in class we will discuss the topics covered in the reading assignments, and introduce additional material from other sources.Students MUST complete the reading assignments by the date listed on the syllabus and attend class for lectures and discussion.

There will be seven (7) quizzes on the reading assignments.Students will analyze samples of faunal remains and present written summaries of their results.There will be a midterm exam and a final exam on material covered in the course.Students are encouraged to draw on what they have learned in other classes (or in their own research experiences) during the discussion periods.Grading: The final grade will be based on: Quizzes on Reading Assignments: 70 points Midterm exam: 100 points Final exam: 100 points Class Projects: 100 points Class Attendance and Participation: 30 points TOTAL: 400 points COURSE OUTLINE DATE TOPIC AND READING ASSIGNMENTS January 6 Introduction, discussion of faunal analysis projects, group assignments January 8 Environmental Perspectives, Electronic Reserve A: Using Environmental Archaeology, Preface and Perspectives by Myra Shackley (1985) January 13 Reconstructing Environments and Diets, Electronic Reserve B: Environmental Reconstruction: Paleoflora and Paleosediment and Paleosoil, by Patricia Rice, and Electronic Reserve C: Eating, by M.

Shackley (1985) ** QUIZ 1 (on the assigned reading) January 15 Reconstructing Environments and Diets, continued, READ: Climate, diet and population at a prehistoric pueblo in New Mexico, by Wilma Wetterstrom (1989).38 January 20 Goals and Methods of Zooarchaeology, Read: Chapters 1 and 2 in The Analysis of Animal Bones from Archaeological Sites, and Introduction and Chapter 1 in The Archaeology of Animals.**QUIZ 2 January 22 The Structure of Bone and Teeth, Read: Chapter 2 in The Archaeology of Animals, “What are bones and teeth?” First Exercise Passed Out **QUIZ 3 January 27 Past Environments and Seasonality, Read: Chapters 3 and 4 in The Archaeology of Animals, “On reconstructing past environments”, and, “In what season was a site occupied?” January 29 Quantification and Interpretation of Faunal Remains, Read: Chapters 3, 4, and 5 in The Analysis of Animal Bones from Archaeological Sites.February 3 **QUIZ 4 Summary and Review; work on First Exercise February 5 MID-TERM EXAM IN CLASS DATE TOPIC AND READING ASSIGNMENTS February 10 continued Quantification and Interpretation of Faunal Remains, Complete First Exercise, Report Results in Class.**QUIZ 5 February 12 Hunting Behavior, Read: Chapter 5 in The Archaeology of Animals, “Our Hunting Past,” and Electronic Reserve D: Hunting, by Myra Shackley.

Begin Second Exercise Write-up of First Exercise Due in Class February 17 Hunting Behavior (continued) 39 Complete Second Exercise, Report Results in Class.**QUIZ 6 February 19 Hunting Behavior (continued) Complete Second Exercise, Report Results in Class.Write-up of Second Exercise Due in Class February 24 Domestication and Other Uses of Animals, Read: Chapter 6 in The Archaeology of Animals, “From Hunter to Herder,” Begin Third Exercise (Age and Sex Determination) February 26 Domestication and Other Uses of Animals (continued), Read: Chapter 7 in The Archaeology of Animals, “Later Domestication and Secondary Uses.” Complete Third Exercise, Report Results in Class.Write-up of Second Exercise Due in Class **QUIZ 7 March 3 Domestication and Other Uses of Animals (continued) Complete Third Exercise, Report Results in Class.

DATE TOPIC AND READING ASSIGNMENTS March 5 Case Studies March 10 Write-up of Third Exercise Due in Class March 12 Final Exam in Class THIS MATERIAL IS AVAILABLE IN ALTERNATIVE FORMATS UPON REQUEST.STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR MAKING THEIR NEEDS KNOWN TO THE INSTRUCTOR, AND ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR SEEKING 40 AVAILABLE ASSISTANCE FROM THE OFFICE OF DISABILITY SERVICES (ODS) AT 292-3307 AS SOON AS POSSIBLE, AND CERTAINLY PRIOR TO THE FIRST EXAMINATION.Please Note: In case of unexpected instructor absences the information will be posted on the following departmental web site.This site should be consulted during inclement weather to check for possible class cancellations or delays.Do not call the department office, check the web site: / Academic Misconduct: All students should become familiar with the rules governing alleged academic misconduct.

All students should be familiar with what constitutes academic misconduct, especially as it pertains to plagiarism and test taking.Ignorance of the rules governing academic misconduct or ignorance of what constitutes academic misconduct is not an acceptable defense.Alleged cases of academic misconduct are referred to the proper university committees.Anthropology 610 Ethnobotany The Ohio State University Spring Quarter 2008 Meeting time and place: MW 1:30-3:30, Lord Hall Room 235 Instructor: Dr.Gremillion, 111 Lord Hall, email protected Office hours: MW 3:30-5:00, and by appointment Course content and rationale: Human-plant interactions have played a critical role in shaping human behavioral and biological adaptations.Ethnobotany is a multidisciplinary field of study that investigates these relationships by combining the anthropologist's emphasis on the cultural context of plant use with the botanist's understanding of the ecological and biological traits of useful plants.This course provides a survey of ethnobotany from a general anthropological perspective (that is, one that considers the biological, cultural, and social role of plants in human societies both past and present).Methods of data collection and data analysis will be considered, but greatest emphasis will be placed on the current state of ethnobotanical knowledge and its significance.Topics to 41 be addressed include different uses of plants (as food or medicine, in ritual, and in manufacture), how people think about plants and the natural world, the origins of agriculture, ecological relationships between humans and plants, paleoethnobotany, and the relevance of ethnobotany to contemporary global issues.

Illustrative examples will be drawn from ethnographic, archaeological, and botanical literature.Carmen: Some of the materials for this course can be accessed via Carmen, an online course tool administered by Technology Enhanced Learning Resources at OSU.To log on, follow this link: /carmen/ Once you reach the Anthropology 610 page, you will find news, readings, copies of handouts, the syllabus, links to web resources, and information about class projects.All handouts, outlines, and other course materials will be posted on this web site.It is up to you to view or download them; no paper copies will be handed out.

Ethnobotany: Principles and Applications.Enduring Seeds: Native American Agriculture and Wild Plant Conservation.Web resources (see course schedule below) Course objectives: On successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1.Explain why ecological relationships between humans and plants can be said to span a continuum representing different types and degrees of interaction.

Discuss the causes and consequences of plant domestication and agricultural subsistence.Discuss the nutritional, social, and economic significance of wild plant foods in both foraging and agricultural populations.Identify some of the bioactive compounds found in plants and discuss the cross-cultural relevance of ethnopharmacology.Discuss the use of psychoactive plants in traditional healing and ritual, using specific examples.

Explain why classification of plants and perception of the plant environment vary crossculturally.Describe methods used to obtain evidence of human-plant relationships from the archaeological record.

Discuss the relevance of ethnobotany to public policy issues, such as environmental conservation and world hunger, and describe the ethical dilemmas faced by ethnobotanists.42 Course structure: Class meetings will combine lecture, discussion, visual presentations, and exercises.In addition, students will devote time outside of the classroom to work on a project (see below).The midterm and final examinations will cover both assigned readings and all in-class activities (lectures, films, student presentations, etc.

Each student will complete a final project consisting of a comprehensive ethnobotanical survey of a selected plant taxon.Results of the survey will be presented to the class as a poster or electronically (as a slideshow or website).At the end of the quarter, students will be asked to hand in an annotated bibliography of sources consulted (undergraduate students) or a research paper (graduate students).

Students will hand in three completed assignments throughout the quarter (details TBA).Final letter grades will be determined on a percentage basis following a standard OSU scale (93 - 100 % = A; 90-92 = A-; 87-89 = B+; 83-86 = B; 80-82 = B-; 77-79 = C+; 73-76 = C; 70-72 = C-; 67-69 = D+; 60-66 = D; below 60 = E).Components used to determine the final grade are weighted as follows: Midterm Final Project Assignments (3) 30% 30% 25% 15% 43 Policies: 1.Attendance policy: Attendance is expected and is essential to doing well in this course.

I will not be available to give private tutorial, provide notes, or respond to calls or emails asking whether you missed “anything important”.It is your responsibility to keep up with course material.Examination dates Examinations may be given in advance of the test date by prior arrangement if, in the instructor’s judgment, there is a legitimate reason for absence.If an exam is missed due to illness and adequate documentation is provided, alternative arrangements will be made (details to be determined on a case-by-case basis).Policy on Academic Misconduct All students should become familiar with the rules governing alleged academic misconduct.All students should be familiar with what constitutes academic misconduct, especially as it pertains to plagiarism and test taking.

Ignorance of the rules governing academic misconduct or ignorance of what consititutes academic misconduct is not an acceptable defense.

Alleged cases of academic misconduct are referred to the proper university committees.Course schedule: (assigned readings are to be completed before the date under which they appear).Web=Anthropology 610 web site; see instructions above.Date M 3/24 W 3/26 M 3/31 W 4/2 M 4/7 W 4/9 M 4/14 W 4/16 M 4/21 W 4/23 Topic/Readings Introduction Ethnobotany as a discipline Cotton Ch.

How to buy an lab report order exclusive writing help from us at nbsp

1 Basics: Grocery store botany; ethnobotanical methods Cotton Ch.

2-4 The ecology of human-plant interaction Minnis Ch.) Film: In Good Hands Wild plants as food Cotton Ch Should i purchase a custom coursework ecology 9 days Premium double spaced Editing.) Film: In Good Hands Wild plants as food Cotton Ch.

11 (Minnis) Film: Beautiful Tree: Chishkale Assignment 1 due Domestication and agriculture Cotton Ch.) Film: Save the Earth, Feed the World Plants in art and technology Cotton Ch 15 Jan 2017 - Read the Chapter 22 of the Book “give me liberty” and answer following questions. you need use TWO quote from the book for each answering and give the page where you got the   Reflection Paper: You will write a short reflection paper Each paper should not be less than 300 words single-spaced..) Film: Save the Earth, Feed the World Plants in art and technology Cotton Ch.14 (Estabrook) Film: Wooden Box Made by Steaming and Bending MIDTERM EXAMINATION Plants and ethnomedicine Minnis Ch.7 (Voeks) Begin Davis Film: The Shaman’s Apprentice Ethnobotany and drug discovery Continue Davis Date M 4/28 W 4/30 M 5/5 W 5/7 M 5/12 W 5/14 M 5/19 W 5/21 M 5/26 W 5/28 Topic/Readings Film: A Treasury of Plant Medicines Assignment 2 due Psychoactive plants and shamanism finish Davis Cotton Ch.8 Ethnobotany and cognition; folk taxonomy; ethnoscience Minnis Ch.1 (Alcorn); Introduction to Part 2 (Brown) start Nabhan Cotton Ch.

9 Paleoethnobotany and historical ethnobotany Cotton Ch.10 Conservation, biodiversity, and cultural survival finish Nabhan Cotton Ch.11 Minnis Chapter 13 (Brush) Field trip (details TBA) Intellectual property rights and biodiversity prospecting Cotton Ch.12 Assignment 3 due Student presentations Student presentations Memorial Day: No class Student presentations All bibliographies due ****Final examination: Tue, June 3, 1:30 pm - 3:18 pm **** Other important information: In case of unexpected instructor absences the information will be posted on the following departmental website.This site should be consulted during inclement weather to check for possible class cancellations or delays.

/news/ If you need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability, you should contact me to arrange an appointment as soon as possible.At the appointment we can discuss the course format, anticipate your needs and explore potential accommodations.I rely on the Office For Disability Services for assistance in verifying the need for accommodations and developing accommodation strategies.If you have not previously contacted the Office for Disability Services, I encourage you to do so.

The Ohio State University Anthropology H597.03 Issues of the Contemporary World: The Prehistory of Environment and Climate Instructor Dr.Yerkes 4008 Smith Laboratory Phone: 292-1328, E-mail: verkes.l! Class Hours MW 9:30-11:18 AM 5024 Smith Laboratory 174 West 18th Avenue Anthropology H597.

03 meets the guidelines for the Capstone: Issues of the Contemporary World GEC category.This course examines the relationships between human behavior and environmental and climate changes in the present and in the past.The course will focus on the EI Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon and the environmental calamities that have been blamed on it in recent years, as well as the calls for a global response to these crises.Recent studies have shown how the climate changes associate with the ENSO phenomenon in different parts of the world are interconnected, and how cooperation between nations is needed to alleviate the impact of these severe weather events.In addition, we consider how ancient EI Nino events may have had an impact on the cultural development of prehistoric societies all over the world.

03 is interdisciplinary in design, and uses resources and information from the disciplines of Anthropology, Geography, and Meteorology.In addition to the general classroom discussions of interdisciplinary topics, groups of students (with different majors and backgrounds) will complete an in-depth case study of the effects of an ENSO event on an ancient civilization, and will present an oral and written summary of their results.The students will learn from each other as they complete this assignment, and draw on their own research I experiences and prior course work.Learning Objectives: In this course students will learn how to: I.understand the relationships between human behavior and envirorunental and climate changes in the present and in the past across the globe and to appreciate the political, economic, and cultural differences among the past societies and present nations of the world and how these differences may have affected their responses to environmental and climate changes.appreciate how devastating "natural catastrophes" like the EI Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon can be and to be aware of the global effects of these environmental calamities.

understand why a global response to these crises is needed and how cooperation between nations is needed to alleviate the impact of these severe weather events.understand how ancient EI Nino/Southern Oscillation events may have had an impact on the cultural development of prehistoric societies in different parts of the world.draw on resources and information from different disciplines like Anthropology, Geography, and Meteorology to study climate changes and the human responses to those changes.

prepare detailed oral and written reports on an ancient ENSO event and the human reactions in the different regions of the world where the event has been documented.work with other students from different major programs on group projects and to draw on their own diverse backgrounds and experiences to complete the research.

and Emperors: El Nino and the/ate o/Civilizations.03 Reader from Greyden Press (Xeroxed articles) Recommended: I.El Nino in History: Storming through the Ages.Caviedes (2000) University Press of Florida.* * * A series of Reserved Readings will be available in Room 212 Lord Hall.*** Information on EI Nino and related phenomena can be obtained from web sites.Course Goals: By the time the giant El Nino of 1997-98 was over, 2,100 people had died and at least 33 billion dollars worth of property had been destroyed or damaged.Were Ancient EI Nino events this devastating? Did they cause calamities that brought down ancient civilizations? In this course, we study the relationship between human behavior and environmental and climate changes in the past.The course will focus on the EI Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon and the environmental calamities that have been blamed on it.

Paleoenvironmental records from coastal Peru contain evidence for EI Nino events spanning the last 5,000 years.Recent studies have shown how ENSO events transform the weather around the world.We will look at the evidence for ancient ENSO events and examine how past weather changes may have affected ancient societies in North and South America, Europe, North Africa, and Australasia.We will outline the methods that are used to reconstruct the past environment and climate and review the basic principles of human ecology and cultural adaptation to different environments, as we debate whether ENSO phenomena are examples of long-term weather cycles or if the recent severe El Nino and La Nina events have been triggered by human actions.Class Format: Students will meet for two periods on Mondays and Wednesdays.

When we meet in class we will discuss the topics covered in the reading assignments, and introduce additional material from other sources.Students MUST complete the reading assignments by the date listed on the syllabus and attend class for lectures and discussion.Groups of students will examine ancient ENSO events and human reactions in different regions of the world and present oral and written summaries of their results.There will be a midterm exam and a final exam on material covered in the course.Students are encouraged to draw on what they have learned in other classes (or in their own research experiences) during the discussion periods.

03 3 Grading: The final grade will be based on: Midtenn exam: Final exam: Class Projects: Class Attendance and Participation: TOTAL: 100 points 100 points 150 points 30 points 380 points COURSE OUTLINE DATE TOPIC AND READING ASSIGNMENTS January 6 Introdnction, form teams for group projects.January 8 Ecological Perspectives, Read Ch.1 in the Reader (Harris: Ecology and Ecosystems).Also read the following (on reserve in 212 Lord Hall): Preface and Introduction in Human Ecology, by Bernard Campbell, pp.

January 13 Understanding and Reconstructing Past Climates I Read Chapters 1 and 2 in Pale climatology, by R.1-46 (on reserve in 212 Lord Hall) January 15 Dating Methods, Geological and Biological Evidence of Climate Change, Read Chapters 7,8, and 9 in Pale climatology, by R.

285-396 (on reserve in 212 Lord Hall) January 20 Martin Luther King Day (observed) NO CLASS January 22 Changing Human Ecosystems, Read Preface and Chapter 10 in Floods, Famines.xi-xviii, and 180-202; Chapter 2 in the Reader (1.

First Exercise: Is there a correlation between the "Little Ice Age" and environmental changes on Crete? Summarize the evidence for such a connection, and discuss the effects of "Little Ice Age" climates on the Cretan landscape and the ancient Cretan people.(15 points) January 27 Understanding and Reconstructing Past Climates II, Read Chapters 3 and 4 in the Reader (W.Burroughs: Proxy Data, and The Global Climate) January 29 What is EI Nino? Read Chapters 1,2,3, and 12 in Floods, Famines, and Emperors, pp.3-54; 223-242, Chapters 1,2, and 6 in El Nino in History, and: National Geographic Vol.195, #3 (March, 1999): El NifiolLa Nina: Nature's Viciolls Cycle: pp.72-95 (on reserve in 212 Lord Hall) Anthropology H597.03 4 DATE February 3 February 5 TOPIC AND READING ASSIGNMENTS Second Exercise: Prepare a briet: written definition of the EI Nino/La Nina/ Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon.

You will also be asked to present an oral summary of your definition in class.Provide a list of the sources for the information that you used to prepare your summary and definition (books, articles, web sites, etc.Use the citation format on the style sheet (20 points) What have you heard about El Nino? Third Exercise: Bring an article to class about the recent effects of the E1 Nino/ La Nina/Southern Oscillation (EN SO) phenomenon that you found in a magazine or newspaper, or on the Web.Present an oral summary of the article and critique it for the class.

Is it accurate? What were the sources used in the article? (15 points) February 10 MIDTERM EXAM in class February 12 El Nino and Ice-Cores, Read Chapters 5 and 6 in the Reader (Thompson et al.: Reconstructing interannual climate variability; and, Glacial records of global climate), and Thompson, L.(1996) Climatic changes for the 2000 years inferred from ice-core evidence in tropical ice cores.(on reserve 212 Lord Hall) February 17 El Nino, the North Atlantic Oscillation, and Global Warming, Read Chapters 4,5, and 11 in Floods, Famines, and Emperors, pp.

February 19 El Nino, History, and Prehistory, Read Chapters 7 and 8 in the Reader (D.Enfield: Historical and prehistorical overview ofEI Nino/Southern Oscillation; and W.Quinn: A study of Southern Oscillation-related climatic activity for A.622-1900 incorporating Nile River flood data).February 24 El Nino and Archaeology, Read the following articles on reserve in 212 Lord Hall: Paulsen, Allison (1986) Climate change and the rise of the state in prehistoric Peru.Paper read at the 85th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Philadelphia; and Chapter 5, pp.

February 26 Oral Presentations of Group Projects I Moche, II InkalTiwanaku ALL READ Chapter 7 in Floods, Famines.119-138 March 3 Oral Presentations of Group Projects III Maya, ALL READ Chapter 8 in Floods, Famines.03 March 5 DATE March 10 March 12 March 19 Oral Presentations of Group Projects IV Chaco Canyon ALL READ Chapter 9 in Flood" Famines.159-177 TOPIC AND READING ASSIGNMENTS Oral Presentations of Group Projects V Nile Valley, VI China ALL READ Chapter 6 in Floods, Famines, and Emperors, pp.99-117 Oral Presentations of Group Projects VI China SENIOR FINAL EXAM WEDNESDAY: FINAL EXAM: 9:30 AM in class 5 *written summary of group project due in my office, 140 Lord Hall, by 4:00 PM THIS MATERIAL IS AVAILABLE IN ALTERNATIVE FORMATS UPON REQUEST.STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR MAKING THEIR NEEDS KNOWN TO THE INSTRUCTOR, AND ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR SEEKING AVAILABLE ASSISTANCE FROM THE OFFICE OF DISABILITY SERVICES (ODS) AT 292-3307 AS SOON AS POSSIBLE, AND CERTAINLY PRIOR TO THE FIRST EXAMINATION.

Please Note: In case of unexpected instructor absences the information will be posted on the following departmental web site.

This site should be consulted during inclement weather to check for possible class cancellations or delays.Do not call the department office, check the web site: / Academic Misconduct: All students should become familiar with the rules governing alleged academic misconduct.All students should be familiar with what constitutes academic misconduct, especially as it pertains to plagiarism and test taking.Ignorance of the rules governing academic misconduct or ignorance of what constitutes academic misconduct is not an acceptable defense.Alleged cases of academic misconduct are referred to the proper university committees.

The Ohio State University Knowlton School of Architecture Architecture 626 Building Construction I AU 2008 Professor Michael Cadwell GA’s: Neal Clements, Arienne Longstreth, Steve Winter, Ken Kremer COURSE DESCRIPTION Architecture 626 provides students with a working knowledge of the technical and cultural implications of wood construction.The recurrent theme of Architecture 626 is ecological, an understanding of the physical environment as the dynamic of interdependent systems, natural and manmade, intrinsic and extrinsic to their sites.This ecological understanding of the physical environment marks a fundamental shift from the industrial, utilitarian understanding that preceded and, to a large degree, precipitated it.Building construction directly reflects this new understanding of the physical environment, because it is the most common means by which we reconfigure that environment.Architecture 626 instills within the student an understanding that even the most prosaic construction, the single-family house, has implications that ripple from the details of the wood light frame, to the planning of suburbia, to the harvesting of natural resources, to the dynamics of global climates.

Lectures follow but are not restricted to Fundamentals of Building Construction, Materials, and Methods by Edward Allen (fourth edition, available at SBX.) Allen’s text is supplemented by readings that underscore an ecological understanding of construction (see attached schedule).While Allen’s text outlines a broad palette of materials and methods, weekly readings and lectures underscore their cultural implications.Lab exercises supplement readings and lectures.In the first, students gain a hands-on understanding of ecological construction principles.In the second, students draw details of historic and contemporary architecture that articulate these principles.In the third, students apply principles and precedents to small-scale building designs.Thus, Architecture 626 links direct experience, established practices, and student invention to a profound ecological understanding of building technology.GENERAL POLICIES All Architecture 626 documents can be found on Carmen.

The Carmen site provides the course syllabus, lab descriptions, review outlines, lecture PowerPoints, and examples of student work.To save resources, hard copies of course material are not provided.All grades are based on uniform criteria established by Professor Cadwell and computed as follows: Final Grade = lab average + exam average 2 +/- class participation Note a final grade can vary up to six points depending upon class participation.Over the quarter, each student will be called upon during lectures as many as three times.A student who answers correctly gains one point, a student who answers incorrectly gains no points, and an absent student looses one point.

The studio section with the highest combined total will be rewarded in a substantial (though, as yet, undisclosed) fashion.Final grades are converted to letter grades as follows: A 100.5 No credit will be given for assignments submitted late or for unexcused absences from labs and exams.Extensions and make-up exams are granted only by Professor Cadwell, only in the case of serious illness or family death, and only after written documentation has been provided (i.

) Unless it is a life or death situation, get the work done.Professor Cadwell's email address is email protected and his office telephone number is 292-3174.Office hours are 2:30 – 3: 30 PM on Tuesdays and Thursdays in 277 Knowlton Hall.COURSE SCHEDULE AND ASSIGNMENTS date lecture/lab reading lab intro Week 1 1.

Introduction to Ecological Construction Lab #1 Week 2 2.Site: Vernacular to Industrial Allen, Chapter 1 3.Site: Industrial to Ecological McKibben, The End of Nature Lab #2 Week 3 5.Site Ecologies Allen, Chapter 2 (19-27,38-42,55-69) 6.Lab #2, "Construction I: Forest to Timber" 7.

Building Ecologies Cronon, Changes in the Land Lab #3 Week 4 8.Building on the Earth Burns & Kahn, Site Matters 9.Lab #3, “Case Study I: Timber Detail” 10.

Wood Fundamentals: Cell to Arch Allen, Chapter 3 Lab #4 Week 5 11.Wood: Reconfigured Resource Allen, Chapter 4 Lab #4, “Case Study II: Timber Construction” 12.Timber: Vernacular to Contemporary Harrison, Forest: The Shadow of Civilization Week 6 13.Wood Light Frame Evolution Allen, Chapter 5 (145-168) Lab #5 no lab 15.Framing a House I Allen, Chapter 5 (169-199) 17.Lab #5, “Construction II: Wood Light Frame” 18.Framing a House II Kwok & Grondzik, Green Studio Handbook Lab #6 Week 8 19.Collection Allen, 200-205, 597-600, and 625-641 20.Lab #6, "Case Study III: Ecological House 1" 21.Breath Kwok & Grondzik, Green Studio Handbook Lab #7 Week 9 22.Lab # 7, “Case Study IV: Ecological House 2” 24.

Wall Fill: Solid Breath Schittich, Solar Architecture Lab #8 Week 10 25.Wall Finishes: Sustainable Tactics Allen, Chapter 7 26.

Lab # 8, “Construction III: Ecological Shelter” Th, Nov 22 Thanksgiving, no class Week 11 27.

Conclusions: An Ecological Summary McDonough & Braungart, Cradle to Cradle no lab Th, Nov 30 Final Reviews, no class Final Exam Wednesday December 10, 11:30-1:18 Art 300.02 (Digital), (GEC) 5 cr: Introduction To Photography Professor: Robert Derr Office: 403B Haskett Hall Telephone: 292-9685 Office Email: email protected Office Hours: TR: 1:30 - 2:30 pm, or by appointment Section 300.01 01876-5 MW 01877-1 MW 01878-6 TR Time 11:30 - 1:18 3:30 - 5:18 3:30 - 5:18 Room HK 406 HK 406 HK 211 Instructor Mary Fahy Zuzana Muranicova Rachel James Section 300.

02 01880-1 MW 01881-6 TR 01882-1 MW 01883-7 TR 01884-2 MW 21532-8 MW 01885-8 TR 01886-3 MW Time 9:30 - 11:18 9:30 - 11:18 11:30 - 1:18 11:30 - 1:18 3:30 – 5:18 3:30 - 5:18 3:30 – 5:18 5:30 - 7:18 Room HK 211 HK 211 HK 211 HK 211 HK 211 HK 408 HK 406 HK 406 Instructor Colleen Oakes Grant Fletcher LaTriece Branson Jessi Walker LaTriece Branson Kisha Swift Grant Fletcher Allison Grimes Mass Lecture 1:30 – 2:18, Thursday, CM 200 Attendance is mandatory for the once-a-week mass lecture.Streaming Video Lectures You will be responsible to view each lecture each week and become familiar with the material discussed in each.The streaming lectures are good sources to review the content discussed in the mass lecture.You will be tested over the first five lectures on the mid-term exam, and the last three on the final exam.You should be able to identify the name of the photographer to his or her photograph in the slide recognition component of the exam, as well as understand the theoretical issues surrounding art and photography from each lecture.

Below is a link to view the streaming video lectures.You may need to download the Real One Player software to view the lectures on your personal computer.Real One Player can be used on either a PC or Mac./mediawww/art300au06/derr03/ Lecture 4./mediawww/art300au06/derr05/ Final Exam Lectures Lecture 6./mediawww/art300au06/derr08/ Mass Exam Information For both the mid-term and final exams, we will meet as one group in Independence Hall.Mid-term Exam, Thursday, May 1, 2008, 1:30PM to 2:18PM Final Exam, Thursday, May 29, 2008, 1:30PM to 2:18PM Final Critique Schedule During finals week.Individual instructors will discuss date in class.Dates and times are also posted on the Registrar’s website for each classes time.

02 is an introductory still photography class dealing with both the practical and conceptual bases of photography.Students will learn basic photographic technique including operation of the camera, lenses and associated accessories, and application of basic photographic techniques such as exposure calculation, shutter speed control, manipulation of depth of field, etc.Further, the student will begin to understand and interpret photographic imagery, practice critical thinking, and discover the possibilities of camera made images.

Lectures will introduce the work of noted photographers, the evolution of aesthetics and theory associated with the history of the medium, and examine the impact that the photographic image exerts in contemporary culture.Learning experiences include: lectures, recitations, examinations, assignments, critiques of assignments, and a final project.GEC Statement This course fulfills the Arts and Humanities Category for Visual and Performing Arts which has the following rationale and objectives: Arts and Humanities: Analysis of Texts and Works of Art Goals/Rationale: Students evaluate significant writing and works of art.Such studies develop capacities for aesthetic and historical response and judgment; interpretation and evaluation; critical listening, reading, seeing, thinking, and writing; and experiencing the arts and reflecting on that experience.Students develop abilities to be enlightened observers or active participants in the visual, spatial, musical, theatrical, rhetorical, or written arts.Students describe and interpret achievement in the arts and literature.Students explain how works of art and literature express social and cultural issues.

To increase an understanding of visual communication through photography.To advance understanding of photographic theory, technique, and aesthetics.To develop an increased ability to express personal understandings and insights through photography.To develop an understanding of the criticism of photographic images and their relationship to materials, techniques, content, and context.Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.

The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292 - 3307, TDD 292 - 0901; /.

Course Requirements (Note: all slides, and prints (300.02 digital files) turned in for grading must be your own work and done during this quarter.) 10% Attendance and active participation in all class meetings, demonstrations and critiques.45% Successful completion of five assignments.Four are visual, one is a presentation to the class.

Exams will include history/theory questions from the readings and the Thursday lectures as well as technical questions learned during class sections.15% Final exam 15% Successful completion of a final project, as defined by your instructor.Attendance/Late Submission of Assignments You are allowed three absences during the duration of the course.Each subsequent absence will lower the final grade by 1/3 a letter grade.

A student with seven excused and/or unexcused absences will receive an automatic E.Late assignments will lose one letter grade per class day (note: this penalty might be specified differently by your instructor.) Tardiness policy: 3 tardies = 1 absence.Attendance will be taken at Thursday lectures, if you miss a mass lecture that is an absence.Evaluation of Assignments: Your photographic work will be evaluated based on the following general criteria: 1.

Technical Proficiency: Technical excellence - the application of learned photographic techniques.Content: Clarity of conceptual approach, effectiveness of the work, and inventiveness of the work regarding your idea.Use of Photography’s Formal Elements: How well you use framing, vantage point, time, the thing itself, the detail, color, light, texture, etc.

Project Presentation and Preparation: How you show your work in critique and the amount of preparation that went into your project, image selection, amount of shooting, etc.Sample Assignment Assessment Form: Project: Student Name: Instrucutor Name: Technical Proficiency: 5 Content: 5 Use of Formal Elements: 5 Presentation & Preparation: 5 10 10 10 10 15 15 15 15 20 20 20 20 25 25 25 25 Course and Quarter: Project Grade: Grading Scale A: 93-100, A-: 90-92 B+: 88-89 B: 83-87 B-: 80-82 and so on.Academic Misconduct It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct /info for students/ .Text Buying a textbook is recommended for students who plan to continue with the photo curriculum.

We recommend buying Photography (9th edition), by London, Upton, & Stone.It incorporates both digital and film based information.All course readings will be available on Carmen.Please see me I may have used books for you to purchase.

01 Read the three Horenstein/Hart excerpts on Carmen for Art 300, as well as the first two (pages 42-51, 176-185) London excerpts by the 2nd week of class.Note: Many Midterm and Final Exams questions will come from these chapters.Read third excerpt from London (pages 268-277) by the 4th week of class.02 Read the three Eismann readings first, then the readings for Art 300 above by the 3rd week of class.Note: Many Midterm and Final Exam questions for Art 300.02 will come from the Eismann chapters as well as the chapters required for Art 300 above.There will be additional discussion in class for each assignment.Each assignment (if using slides) will be properly mounted slides labeled with the student's name and the assignment # on the mount.

All 36 slides should be in a plastic slide page.Most assignments will be done using print film processed commercially at Cord, Target, or Walmart.02: Each assignment will be submitted with the appropriate digital prints and or CD containing all the digital images made for the assignment.

The prints will represent your final solution to the assignment and the CD will contain all your initial images.Assignment #1, part A Assignment #1, part B 2.16/17 May 5/6 May 14/15 June 2, 3, 4, 5 Final Project The final project is an opportunity for you to either expand on an idea from an earlier project or to create a new project of your own choosing.Since time is short, one possibility would be to continue work on project #4 and expand it for your final project.Consult with your instructor with your plans for a final project before you start doing the work.The final project must be comprised of 7 -15 prints, that are formally presented.

Your instructor might also suggest materials and other photographers for you to look at, that would be appropriate for the project.You may resolve your idea in any photographic form, which is conceptually appropriate: slides, black and white prints or color prints processed at Cord.Consider adding text panels to your prints etc.Consideration should be given to the presentation and to the ideas/theory that have influenced the work.29: The Syntax of Photography: light, frame, the moment, point of view Invention of Photography.

New Objectivity & Surrealist Photography.General Procedures Students must provide their own slide and color print processing through a commercial lab.

02 students must provide their own printing and transfer of digital files to a CD through a commercial lab.Lockers are available in the 4th floor lab area on a shared basis.A combination lock must be used and registered with the 3rd floor lab office.University procedures state that for a 5 credit hour class, the average student will need to spend 15 hours per week (in and out of class) to earn a C.02 is scheduled for 5 hours in lecture and class.Students should expect to spend approximately 10 additional hours for readings, photographing, slide and print sorting, etc.Approximate cost $200 - $600 dependent upon your possession of a camera.

01, 35mm adjustable camera with light meter (manual control of shutter, aperture, focus and ISO must be possible).Digital adjustable camera for the 300A sections.02, digital format adjustable camera with a minimum of 3 mega pixels (control of shutter, aperture, white balance, flash, exposure compensation, and ISO must be possible).

02, CDs to store and submit digital files.01, 2- 4 rolls of transparency film (good for E-6 processing) and 8-12 rolls of color print negative film.02, a fine line waterproof marker (Sharpie works very well) for marking slide mounts and CDs.• Film & Print Processing For slide processing and prints: Cord Camera (5th Avenue store is the fastest-1132 W.

For supplies and used photo equipment: Midwest Photo Exchange, 3313 N.02, Most camera stores: Cord, CVS, Target, and Meyer can print directly from your camera or memory card.They can also transfer your files to a CD for long-term storage.Epson ink and paper can be purchased at computer stores.Web Resources B&H Photo Video Epson Freestyle Miscellaneous * Please cut off your cell phones while you are in class and lecture.They are disruptive, intrusive, and disrespectful to the class.

* Active participation is a critical component of this class.Everyone is expected to talk in class during class critiques and discussions of reading assignments.* All assignments are due at the beginning of class and ready for presentation.* Assignments that are turned in on time may be redone and resubmitted at any time during the quarter but no later than Wednesday, May 28 and Thursday, May 29.

* Excused absences are those absences as defined by The Ohio State University Handbook.Students are responsible for any material or assignments missed as a result of their absence.You must provide a doctor’s note for the exact date of your absence.Three tardies will equal one absence, in either lecture or lab.

Discuss course materials and requirements.

Bring cameras and camera manuals to next class.Start discussion of camera controls and light metering methods.Assign the Photographer's Eye (Reading #1).Discuss camera controls and metering methods.Encourage students to start looking at technical readings at Library's Electronic Reserves.Go outside and start doing Assignment # 1, Part A, as a group.31/1) Presentation and discussion of Assignment #1, Part A.2/3) Go outside with class and work on Assignment #1, Part B.

7/8) Presentation and discussion of Assignment #1, Part B.

10) Discuss and show work related to Assignment #2.14/15) Start Student Presentations of Selected Artists.16/17) Presentation and discussion of Assignment #2.New Objectivity & Surrealist Photography.21/22) Spillover from Presentation and discussion of Assignment #2.23/24) Continue discussion of Assignment #3.

Continue Student Presentations of Selected Artists.

28/29) Review slides and materials for mid-term.

Thursday, (May 1) Midterm Exam Week 7 M/T (May 5/6) Presentation and discussion of Assignment #3.

W/R (May 7/8) Spillover from Assignment #3.Week 8 M/T (May 13/13) Discuss and show work related to Assignment #4.Encourage students to start work on final project.

W/R (May 14/15) Presentation and Critique of Assignment #4.Work (or discuss) final W/R (May 21/22) Work on Final Project.Week 10 M/T (May 26/27) Monday, May 28 Holiday for Memorial Day, No Class Review Slides and Materials for Final Exam.W/R (May 28/29) Review Slides and Materials for Final Exam.Thursday, (May 29) Final Exam Week 11 M/T/W/R (June 2, 3, 4, 5) Final Project Presentations.One roll of medium speed (100-200), daylight slide film.(Use exposures 1-18) Make sure you read the three Horenstein readings on Carmen before completing this assignment.The reflected light meters in your cameras are designed to give you the correct exposure when you meter a gray card or a scene whose tonal values average out to the tonal value of a gray card (middle gray).

Choose a scene with a good range of tonal values (example: a light side of a building with dark bushes in front) that you feel might average out to middle gray.First take this sequence of 6 pictures: 1.Take a reading using your camera's light meter.(Note: speed shouldn't be below 1/30 sec.

Now move back and photograph the scene using the reading obtained from the gray card.

Open up one stop from the reading obtained in step 2 above.(Example: reading in step 2 was 1/125 sec @f8.(In example it would be 1/125sec @f4) 5.(In example it would be 1/125sec @f11) 6.

(In example it would be 1/125sec @f16) Now repeat this sequence (pictures 7-12) using a scene that you feel has tonal values that average lighter than middle gray.(Example: a light wall without any dark objects in front of it.) Now repeat this sequence (pictures 13-18) using a scene that you feel has tonal values that average darker than middle gray.(Example: a dark wall without any light objects in front of it.

) Note: picture #2 above should always give you the correct exposure.Pictures #3 and #4 should give you slides overexposed by one stop, by two stops, etc.Note: the purpose of this exercise is (1) to determine how well your meter is working and (2) to get a feel for what scenes tend to average out to middle gray and that do not, in which case you might have to correct the average meter reading by increasing or decreasing exposure (if you want to be absolutely sure about an exposure, use the gray card).Frame (exposures 19-27) Shoot 9 pictures that pay special attention to the frame.

(Use the gray card for each shot to determine exposure for pictures 19-22, then use average meter reading for pictures 23-27.) Think of the frame as a pointing device, a way of telling the viewer—this is what this photograph is about.Imagine you see a couple on a bench in the quad, and you like the romantic feeling of the scene.If you are too far away, the frame might be too busy with other things, the trees in the background, two squirrels in the foreground, pedestrians on the sides, and the couple will be too small in the picture.If on the other hand, you are too close to the couple, you might not get enough of the environment, the trees, the flowers, which make the scene seem idyllic.

If you are closer still, all you might see are the pimples on the boy's face.Over-busy pictures might make it difficult to tell what a picture is about.While the opposite is a frame that has large parts empty, like a picture that is mostly sky or an asphalt parking lot.In addition, think about what happens at the edges and how you cut things off.

Related to the frame is the problem of foreground/background.Be careful that the background doesn't conflict in unexpected and unwanted ways with the foreground.Point of View (exposures 28-36) With these exposures explore a different point of view from that of an upright person taking pictures straight ahead.Most photographs are taken at an eye level of around five feet six inches from the ground.For example, shoot down or up as opposed to horizontal.Note that lines placed at the diagonals of a frame result in very dynamic pictures.Or crawl around your apartment or sidewalk taking photographs from the point of view of a cat.Or take pictures very close up to your subject.One roll of medium speed (100-200 ASA) daylight slide film.Light (exposures 1-18) All good photographs depend on the light being right.I want you to find 18 situations where the quality of light is the main concern for making the picture.I also want you to explore different light situations so you can see the difference in the resulting slides.

Make sure you read the first two London readings on Carmen.Shoot six pictures each of any three of these five situations (1-18): 1.Six pictures of the same subject (a building, a street corner) taken at six times of the day (early morning, mid morning, noon, afternoon, late afternoon, and dusk).Six pictures taken in the shadow side of buildings on a sunny day.

Notice the blue cast if it's a clear day.Six pictures taken in tungsten light inside a building at night.How can you exploit the cast that results? 4.Six pictures that combine daylight for which the slide film is balanced and tungsten—for example, photograph a well-lit Dairy Queen towards the end of the day.Six pictures that combine available light and flash.Say you photograph a friend at the quad late in the day.

Set the flash on automatic to light the person, and set the speed on the camera as required to expose for the background.Moment (exposures 19-36) When to click the shutter is a crucial decision when making a photograph.Cartier-Bresson, a French photographer, called this perfect moment, the “decisive moment.Shoot six pictures each of any three of these 5 situations: 1.Six pictures that stop the action in the picture at just the right moment.

Consider shooting as fast as 1/500 sec in good light to stop action.Note that you are not only trying to stop action at a crucial moment that epitomizes the action, but also at a moment when the form of the elements of the picture feel right.Six pictures that experiment with very slow shutter speeds, say 1/4 sec, to blur the action and depict the feeling of motion.Have a friend run back and forth in front of you, and shot at 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, and 1/60.

Note that in order to shoot slow, you might need a tripod or a way of buttressing the camera and that the light has to be low, like at the end of the day, or you won't be able to use very slow speeds.Follow a moving object with your camera, a bicyclist, for example, sand shoot at slow shutter speeds, like at a 1/8 sec, 1/15 sec, etc.The bicyclist should be fairly sharp while the background should blur.

Slides where the action of the picture is stopped at just the right moment.Six pictures taken at night, hand held, using a slow shutter speed.Try 1/4 second in a street location in High Street where some light is falling from a street lamp or a well-lit building.Meter a gray card in the light to determine the f-stop.

Try to use the blur that results to create a sense of drama, of mystery.Put the camera on a tripod and shoot really long exposures at night.Try 30 seconds, one minute, two minutes, etc.of a dimly lit night scene (lit by a street light or moonlight).

Note: In all these exercises always try to make interesting pictures.What is an interesting picture? You are going to spend the next 10 weeks trying to answer that question.(Color Print Film, 200 ASA medium speed) Documentary photographs can be defined very broadly as pictures of the world done in such a way that the photographer hasn't affected or altered significantly what is in front of the camera.The opposite would be something like advertising photography, where everything is constructed and arranged for the camera.Documentary images, from the beginning, have exploited the belief that photographs don't lie, that they have a privileged relationship to truth, to evidence, and to the real.Early in photography's history, photographers fanned the globe to bring back to home viewers, images depicting people, places, and monuments that the public had not personally witnessed and had little access.

Once the entire world had been photographed, documentary photographers turned inward and documented social situations in their own back yards; situations that needed to be exposed and corrected such as the child laborers in Lewis Hine's photographs and the plight of the farmers during the Depressions.Underlying all these activities was the commonly held belief that photographs don't lie, that pictures say a thousand words.We know that most documentary photographs are not objective; they are simply selective takes of reality that corroborate the beliefs of the photographer or the society at large.

Add to this the fact that photographs are by nature ambiguous and can say anything.

To quote Susan Sontag, "Any photograph has multiple meanings; indeed, to see something in the form of a photograph is to encounter a potential object of is the surface, now think—or rather feel, intuit, what is beyond it, what the reality must be like if it looks that way." So how do you do this assignment? We'll show many examples of historical and contemporary documentary projects from which to draw ideas.One solution that comes to mind when doing a documentary project is to add text to the images to narrow meanings.Another possibility is to tell stories using a sequence of pictures.A way to eliminate the position of "outsider" is to document something you are intimately familiar with and to which you have access – your favorite bar, your dorm, your family, your farm, the kitchen employees at the pizza hut where you work.

Discuss your ideas with your instructor.This assignment must be comprised of 7 -15 prints, and you should also turn in your 36 exposure contact sheet and/or CD for this assignment.You may need to shoot several rolls to work out your technique and vision.Turn in all your contact sheets and/or CDs shot for this assignment.Portrait/Self-Portrait & Written Statement (Color Print Film) The portrait is a problematic area in current photographic practice.20th century portraiture has questioned the very terms by which an individual can be known or expressed in terms of a photographic image.19th century photographers didn't have such qualms.Partly because they believed that physiognomy was character and how a person looked defined who they were.In addition, at first, the daguerreotype captured the appearance of a sitter with such perfection that it quickly supplanted all other forms of portraiture.

But because of the long exposure time and the contraptions that held the sitters face fixed, there was little opportunity to capture anything but a stiff pose, as if the sitter was about to have a tooth pulled.With faster films more candid portraits could be taken and Nadar, a French photographer working in the 1850s is quoted as saying that "anyone can take a portrait, but only a true artist can capture the very essence of a sitter." Yousuf Karsh, a 20th century Canadian photographer, would agree, he said "Within every man and woman a secret is hidden and as a photographer, it's my task to reveal it." A more common contemporary attitude is expressed by Duane Michals, who said, "All that a photograph can tell us is what a person looked like at a certain time." Or Diane Arbus, who alleges, "A photograph is a secret about a secret.

" Moreover, postmodern theories of the self propose that a unified, natural, and self-cognizant self is a myth.Instead, we tend to have fluid and ever changing self-identities, constantly pulled by external societal forces, full of tension and contradictions.Do a series of portraits of others or self-portraits that reveal something (or lie) about the subjects.This assignment must be comprised of 7 -15 prints, and you should also turn in your 36 exposure contact sheet and/or CD for this assignment.You may need to shoot several rolls to work out your technique and vision.

Turn in all your contact sheets and/or CDs shot for this assignment.Written Statement Component: For your Portraiture/Self-Portraiture assignment, you will be responsible to type a two-page, doublespaced project explanation.This written assignment will be graded using four distinct criteria, and will be turned in with your photographs.This will be worth 25% of your Portrait/Self-Portrait assignment grade.Writing Proficiency = quality of grammar, spelling, paragraph construction, coherency of thought, etc.Content Exploration = You should write about how and why you are making the portraits or selfportraits in this project.

What are you trying to say about portraiture as well as your subjects? How are you using the formal elements to create a strong photograph? Write about your concepts and desires behind your photographs.Historical References = You should mention one photographer and photograph that has inspired some aspect of this project.Write about why the photograph and photographer are inspirational and how they relate to you project.Creative Direction = How do you write this concise two-page statement and make it interesting to read? Be creative in the construction of your thoughts and words.Suggestions: If you want to capture more than just what a sitter looks like, consider adding verbal information to the image.

Statements, thought, and facts presented with an image can enhance a portrait.Make a decision about the light, what affect you want, and be consistent.Can the background convey information about the sitters? Think how authors and professors tend to be photographed with a bookcase behind them.How about props? Can you think about a series of portraits of friends with their favorite possessions (hats, outfits, etc.)? Think about what might connect a group of portraits, for example, a group of people who believe in aliens, who wear hats backwards, who have their noses pierced, etc.Self-Portraits: What can you communicate about yourself using just photographs? Using photographs and texts? Photographs and stories? Can you reveal something about yourself obliquely like photographing your favorite objects with attached stories? The crucial question will be: how much are you willing to reveal? Where do you draw the line? Is what you reveal interesting or thought provoking? Is it true or is it fiction? Assignment #4.

(Color Print Film) Traditional Documentary photography practice stands at a crossroads.Not only are its claims of objectivity under attack – we are now very aware of the many ways in which photographs lie – but also the digital age makes the truth and value of photographs highly questionable, since any photograph can be seamlessly altered.In addition, television has virtually eliminated the old outlets for documentary work, such as the old Life Magazine.The decisive moment described by Cartier-Bresson in the 50s has given way to the Constructed Moment of the 80s and 90s.This transition has been influenced not only by the exhaustion of traditional documentary practice but also by the influx of artists who use photography, who come from a tradition of "making" as opposed to "taking.

" Thus Cindy Sherman makes herself into different personas for her photo works, Laurie Simmons creates and photographs miniature worlds inhabited by dolls, and Joel-Peter Witkin recreates bizarre tableaux filled with midgets and cadavers.The form these photographs take is usually similar to a pseudo-documentary, that is, we pretend that their elaborate constructions are really a real moment, just like the movies.The emphasis of this assignment is to construct a picture, that is, to make something to be photographed.It could be a pseudo-documentary, that is, a scene photographed to look like a documentary moment, except that the moment is staged.Think of typical moments you find yourself with your friends, and recreate those moments in photographs.

It could be a sequence of events, staged for the camera.It could be a constructed environment, designed for the camera.It could be a series of pictures with a strong narrative content.You'll be exposed to samples of this kind of work in the mass lectures and by your instructors.This assignment must be comprised of 7 -15 prints, and you should also turn in your 36 exposure contact sheet and/or CD for this assignment.

You may need to shoot several rolls to work out your technique and vision.Turn in all your contact sheets and/or CDs shot for this assignment.Presentation on Photographer You will be responsible for a 15-minute presentation of a photographer of your choice to the class.You will select a photographer from the below list of photographers, and no photographer can be repeated.

For the presentation you will compile a PowerPoint presentation of at least 10 images from your photographer of choice.I suggest going to the library to select books to photograph.You can download images via the web, but do make sure that the image quality is good (no pixilated images).Your instructor will show the class how to use the copy stand in the 3rd floor lab to photograph books.A second copy stand should be available in the 4th floor Gray Card Room.

Your presentation should introduce your photographer, giving historical background information.Address such questions as: Why do they use photography? How does his or her work speak to you? What is the social, political, and artistic climate of the times in which he or she was photographing? Why did you select this particular photographer and the particular images? Are the issues surrounding this photographer’s work still relevant today? How were they influential during his or her popularity? Be sure to include quotes in your presentation of your chosen photographer.Quotes will help you understand the perspective of the photographer which will help you examine his or hers photographs.Photographers Choices: Louis Daguerre, William Henry Fox Talbot, Charles N gre, Gustave Le Gray, Nadar, Roger Fenton, Alexander Gardener, Carleton E.Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, Henry Peach Robinson, Julia Margaret Cameron, Lewis Carroll, Jacob Riis, Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen, Gertrude K sebier, Paul Strand, Lewis Hine, Alexandr Rodchenko, Eug ne Atget, Man Ray, Berenice Abbott, John Heartfield, August Sander, L zlo Moholy-Nagy, Hans Bellmer, Andr Kert sz, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Imogen Cunningham, Edward Weston, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Raghubir Singh, Aaron Sisking, Harry Callahan, Minor White, Jerry Uelsmann, Robert Frank, Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Roy DeCarava, Lisette Model, Diane Arbus, Gary Winogrand, Lee Friedlander, Danny Lyon, Larry Clark, Duane Michals, Lewis Baltz, Robert Adams, Bernd & Hilla Becher, John Baldessari, Ed Ruscha, Lucas Samaras, Robert Heinecken, Francesca Woodman, Martha Rosler, Alan Sekula, Richard Avedon, Helmut Newton, Barbara Kruger, Cindy Sherman, Richard Prince, Sherrie Levine, Sebasti o Salgado, Lorna Simpson, Andres Serrano, Robert Mapplethorpe, Joel-Peter Witikin, Sandy Skoglund, James Casabere, Nan Goldin, Wolfgang Tillmans, Larry Sultan, Tina Barney, Alber Chong, Thomas Demand, Andreas Gursky, Laurie Simmons, Yinka Shonibare, Carrie May Weems, Catherine Opie, Pierre Et Gilles, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Uta Barth, Micahel Wesley, Jeff Wall, Wang Jinsong Syllabus Art 353 Art of Podcasting The Ohio State University, Department of Art Introduction to the concepts and techniques of producing, editing, publishing and critiquing personal and artistic video/audio content as related to the medium of Podcasting.

Prerequisites: none Course Description In this class, students will develop and publish video podcasts on the web.Students will be exposed to video theory, practice and critical analysis to assist with the construction of podcasts that are relevant and aesthetic.The class will teach programs and processes for adding unique rich media onto Blogs (Weblogs) in addition to helping students to develop a personal vision for their site.We are currently in a mass media revolution that is greater than the invention of the printing press.

Never before has a person of modest means had the capacity to create and distribute works that can reach a potential audience of millions globally.We are in the earliest stages in the creation of a new medium for artistic expression.Early users and makers have the wonderful opportunity to shape this medium and help to establish new direction and differentiation from the commercialism of distributed video broadcast products.This medium has made it possible for artworks to be created and distributed for an audience of a select few, or for millions.Using RSS (Real Simple Syndication) feeds and small multimedia files, any content creator can be syndicated to news aggregators for easy, free storage and distribution.

Objectives This class will focus on creating podcasts that are artistically and professionally produced as well as formatted to the popular distribution standards.Students will: • • • • • • • Develop a Blog to express an artistic vision Develop a personal approach to new narrative story-telling Review the history of personal journaling and documentary.Gain an understanding of common video production rules Learn basic audio production and enhancement Develop a rubric for micro-video presentations and streaming media Gain a working knowledge of criticism and analysis regarding media-oriented artwork Procedures Through hands-on demonstrations, lectures, Blog screenings, discussions, critiques, writing and artmaking, students will explore pertinent issues and topics revolving around podcasting as art.All lectures will describe techniques for creating podcasts on both Windows and Apple platforms, however, Apple products will be used for most examples.Students will be provided links to free software that can be used in place of commercially used software in the examples.

Texts/Resources Blogs: / / / / /hello/art / /art mobs/ / Texts – on reserve in the Fine Arts Library: Arnheim, Rudolf, Visual Thinking.Berkeley: University of California Press, 1969 Bernard, Sheila Curran.Documentary Storytelling for Video and Filmmakers.Story: Substance, Structure, Style, and the Principles of Screenwriting .This American Life, National Public Radio broadcasts Grading Will be broken down in the following manner: 40 % 35 % 15 % 10 % Assignments 1 – 4 (10% each) Final project, and completed podcast site Quality, clarity and content of written work - includes artist statements and reviews Quality of class participation in discussions and critiques Each artistic assignment will be evaluated equally on these four criteria: Concept - idea, intention and meaning Creativity - originality of thought and expression Composition - arrangement and organization of elements Craftsmanship - skillful use of technique and attention to detail All students are expected to create their own, original media.The use of copyrighted music, images or video in this class is strictly prohibited and will result in an "e" for the project.

Late assignments will drop one letter grade for each class period.Grade Scale: 93 -100% A 90 - 92% A87 - 89% B+ 83 - 86% B 80 - 82% B77 - 79% C+ 73 - 76% C 70 - 72% C67 - 69% D+ 63 - 66% D 0 - 62% E Attendance Policy You are expected to come to class on time, ready to work and with all necessary supplies and materials.Your final grade will be lowered by one full letter upon your second absence - and again for each additional absence.3 late arrivals or early departures = 1 absence.Excused absences are: family emergencies, established religious holidays and illness with an official doctor's note indicating that you could not attend class on that particular day.

You are responsible to find out what you missed and complete any missed work.Both midterms and the final will require MANDATORY attendance.All students must attend these critiques.Failure to attend will result in a failing grade for that assignment.Required Supplies • 10 to 20 CDs and/or DVDs to archive work • Any device that captures digital video and audio, such as a digital still camera with a video setting, a cell phone with video capture capabilities or a miniDV camera.

If you do not already own one of these devices, an inexpensive video camera such as the “Vidster” ($50) would be a necessary purchase.Academic Misconduct It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.The use of copyrighted music, images or video in class projects is strictly prohibited.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).

For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( /info for students/ ).Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 2920901; / Assignments Each student will be required to create a podcast site and make a minimum of the following 5 creative submissions to the site.Create a 1 to 3 minute creative podcast that is about you 2.

Create a 1 to 3 minute creative podcast of an interview with another person 3.Create a 1 to 3 minute creative podcast with just photos and audio (no music) 4.Create a 1 to 3 minute creative podcast using audio, but no words Final.Create a 3 to 5 minute podcast that exemplifies your Blog artist/mission statement .Writing assignments: there will be two artist statements and two required reviews of podcasts, using the Description, Interpretation, Evaluation, and Theory method of analysis.

Each writing assignment is to be one to two pages in length.Schedule: Week 1—A Frame for Understanding and Creating Critical analysis: What is criticism? • Description, Interpretation, Evaluation, Theory Review of popular podcasts by number of views Why are these ranked high? What is the value? Are they relevant? What are the production standards? Week 2—It’s the Story Narrative techniques Prop’s functions From Samuel Pepys to hubris Self documentation (podcast examples) Three act structure put to rest Simply Quickly…editing for meaning and message Narrative environment Character Sound Location Camera tips Basic copyright understanding DUE: Written review of podcast #1 Week 3—Making it • iMovie (and/or Final Cut) • iWeb • GarageBand DUE: Assignment #1 Bio Project Week 4—Post it Blogster accounts accounts (or an OSU web space for hosting) Understanding RSS Aggregator accounts: iTunes, FeedBurner, Yahoo… DUE: Artist statement reflecting on project #1 Week 5—Enhance Basic editing theory and best practices Audio production techniques Creating a soundtrack DUE: Assignment #2 Interview Week 6—Alternative Media Photocasting: storytelling with audio and photos Getting good video from non video cameras Compressing for best quality DUE: Assignment #3 Photo/Audio piece Week 7—Alternative Narrative Moods and media Video and sound manipulation DUE: Assignment #4 Audio/Video without talking Week 8—Production and Analysis In-class, critical analysis of submitted podcasts Due: Podcast list and written review of podcast #2 Week 9—Progress review DUE: Final overall Blog artist mission statement Week 10—Final Critique DUE: Final Project – 3 to 5 minute podcast • Course Description Daniela Barberis 468 Hagerty Hall barberis.l ( ;; Phone: (614) 688-5435 Office Hours: Mon.9:30 -11:18 AM in ML0185 Science is everywhere present in our daily lives, often generating controversy and headlines in the news.From arguments over cloning, genetically modified foods or nuclear missile defense, many of the major issues of the day emerge from the worlds of science and technology.This course will address some of these cases in order to explore two larger questions.First, it will help you understand what science is, as both a social and an intellectual enterprise.

Second, it will discuss what roles science plays - and should play - in our society.No scientific knowledge is required in order to take this course .Course Requirements 1) Read the assigned material before class and come prepared to discuss it.Bring your questions, regarding both your understanding of the text and issues you would like to see addressed about the subject.Gass participation will account for 10% of your grade.

2) There will be an in-class exercise of some kind every class (with some exceptions).This may be a short group exercise or an individual response paper.The results of this work will be turned in and will account for 30% of your grade.The aim of this work is to get you to actively engage with the course materials and promote in-class discussion.

3) A discussion list will be established for this course on Carmen.

You are required to post brief comments / reactions on the readings at least 6 times during the term and are encouraged to do so more frequently.The purpose of this list is to raise the level of class discussion generally while focusing our attention on issues of particular interest to class members.This will account for 10% of your grade.The postings should be completed the evening before class (by 10 PM).I,J 4) At the end of the course there will be a final essay paper.Topics for this paper will be distributed two weeks before the essay is due (on the last day of class, 03/12/2009).This will account for 50% of your grade.Course Goals or What will you learn in this course? Reading skills; wri ting skills; framing discussion; raising questions, new perspectives on science and technology.GEC Category: Arts and Humanities: Cultures and Ideas Arts and Humanities coursework develops students' capacities to evaluate significant writing and works of art, and for aesthetic response and judgment; interpretation and evaluation; critical listening, reading, seeing, thinking, and writing; and experiencing the arts and reflecting on that experience.

This course is a core course in the Societal Perspectives about Science and Technology minor.Information regarding the minors and their requirements may be found online at /interdisciplinary.Readings: These six books are available at Barnes and Noble and also on reserve (Closed Reserves) at the Science and Engineering Library: Steven Shapin, The Scientific Revolution.(Also available online via library web page.Pinch, The Golem: What everyone should know about science.Pinch, The Golem at large: What you should know about technology.

James Watson, The Double Helix: A personal account of the discovery of the structure of DNA.Larson, Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate over Science and Religion.Daniel Kevles, TJze Baltimore Case: A Trial of Politics, Science, and Character.

Schedule of Topics Note: This is a provisional schedule of topics.The subjects we actually address may differ from these.What is a scientific fact? Facts are commonly taken to be the bedrock of science, incontestable bits of truth, discovered objectively and shorn of all social or cultural content.

Yet, humans have not always thought of nature in terms of "facts." So where did they come 2 from, and why do we believe in them? We can understand what facts are (and are not) by looking at how they are arrived at, how they sometimes become controversial, and how they can disappear.Shapin, TI,e Scientific Revolution (1996),89-117.Pinch, TI,e Golem at Large (1998), 7-29.Dawkins, "Arresting Evidence," The Sciences, November-December 1998, 20-25.What is a scientific discovery? Science makes discoveries, it reveals new things to us in the natural world: things like oxygen, electrons and living coelacanths.The endless parade of new discoveries is part of what has given science its immense cultural value.

Looked at closely, however, the process of discovery itself becomes distinctly mysterious.Is there a "logic" of discovery - a method by which discoveries may be attained? If so, what is it? What is the relation between the discovery and its discoverer? Finally, how do we decide that a draI?1atic new claim is in fact .Kuhn, "The historical structure of scientific discovery," in Kuhn, The essential tension (1977), 165-77 (orig.

Pinch, The Golem: What you should know about science (2nd Ed.

, 1998), "Anew window on the universe: the non-detection of gravitational waves," 91-107.The figure of the scientist is very influential in modern society.But what are the characteristics that define a scientist? Where do they come from and why are they so respected? How have they changed/ are changing over time? To answer these questions we will look at Weber's influential formulation of the scientific ethos.

Then we will compare that portrait of the scientist with Watson's selfportrait in Double Helix, a modern "warts-and-all" account of science at work.On the web at: /wiki/Science as a Vocation - J.Watson, The Double Helix: A Personal Account of the Discovery of the Structure of DNA (1968), esp.

What is a scientific laboratory? 3 Scientific experiments and tests are commonly carried out in laboratories.The word is an old one, coined in the seventeenth century.

It originally referred to an alchemist's study - a place of work (in Latin, labor) and a place of prayer (oratorium) .But today's laboratories are very different places.How do their characteristics affect what takes place there? And how can we be confident that the artificial conditions of the lab properly reflect the circumstances of the "real world" outside? To answer those questions we will consider the fortunes of Louis Pasteur in the 19th century, when he attempted to use laboratories to revolutionize the life sciences of his time.But we will also find out that Pasteur's problems remain with us today in the testing of Genetically Modified Organisms.Latour, "Give me a laboratory and I will raise the world," in K.), Science Observed: Perspectives on tile Social Study of Science (London: Sage, 1983), 141-70.Mann, "Biotech goes wild," Tecilnology Review, July / August, 1999.Did science slay God? Ever since its first publication, the Darwinian theory of evolution has been the focus of bitter controversies about science and religion.We will look at how those controversies flared up at the outset, with the development and reception of Darwin's theory in his own day.Then we will move forward in time to consider the Scope's Trial in 1920s Tennessee, at which proponents of evolution clashed head-on with proponents of fundamentalist Christianity.Finally, we will address current arguments about intelligent design in the context of debates about science and secularism.Movie: "Inherit the Wind" (1960), to be watched in class.

Larson, Summer jor the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate over Science and Religion, pp.What is a scientific prediction? Scientists are supposed to test their claims.

This is often done by making predictions and then checking whether they come true.But what is the margin of error acceptable when performing such tests? More generally, how much certainty can the public place in scientific predictions, especially of great events that cannot be closely modeled in the laboratory? Major policy issues hang on such questions, as in the case of nuclear waste disposal.Collins and Pinch, The Golem, "Two experiments that proved' the theory of relativity," 27-55.Polakovic, "Predicting the Big One a Big uro," Los Angeles Times, September 7, 1999, AI, A6.

Wheelwright, "For our Nuclear Wastes, there's Gridlock on the Way to the Dump," Tile Smithsonian, May 1995, 40-50.What is a scientific instrument? Scientific tests and predictions often reI y on instruments.The manufacturing of scientific instruments is an enterprise centuries old, but in the last hundred years or so the scope, scale, size and expense of such instruments has increased dramatically.As we depend more and more on such machines, we need to ask the simple question: what comes first, the instrument or the science? P.Assmus, "Artificial Clouds, Real Particles," in D.

), Tile Uses of Experiment (1989), 225-69.Oberg, "Why the Mars Probe Went Off Course.Does science need policing? It is fairly common to hear science characterized as an ethical enterprise "-one with its own norms of conduct, which are enforced by the scientific community itself.Thus many people believe science is less subject to fraud than most human activities, and that when such misconduct occurs, it is quickly rooted out by the very process of testing that makes science what it is.If this is so, what are the norms of science? What effect do they have on the practice of scientific work? And, perhaps most importantly, who makes sure they are observed? To address these questions, we will look at a classic description of the scientific ethos as moral and self-sufficient - a description written against a background of strident interventionism by Stalinist and Nazi states.We will then examine two recent cases where that ethos has been questioned: the so-called "Baltimore case," in which Congress insisted on imposing outside oversight of laboratory practices; and the Wen Ho Lee case, in which the world of Los Alamos - a world in which the openness of science did not obtain - was put on embarrassing display.Merton, "The Nonnative Structure of Science," in Merton, The Sociology of Science: Theoretical and Empirical Investigations (1973),267-78.Kevles, The Baltimore Case: A Trial of Politics, Science, and Clzaracter (1998), 19-46; 198-265.

Dan Stober, Ian Hoffman, A Convenient Spy: Wen Ho Lee and the Politics of Nuclear Espionage (2002),36-44; 96-102; 128-139; 179-190; 332-349.Who owns science? 5 , Scientific knowledge if often held to be the common property of all of humanity.But it turns out that knowledge can be made a subject of property, at least temporarily: this is what patents and copyrights are for.But where should the property rights over scientific knowledge stop? And if science becomes a business, dedicated to the pursuit of patents, how can its reputation for disinterested research be preserved? J.

Boyle, "The Intellectual Land Grab," in Boyle, SlmmmlS, Software, and Spleens: Law and tlte Construction of the Information Sodety (1996): 125-30.Pollan, "Playing God in the Garden," New York Times, 10/25/1998, magazine, 44-92 (discontinuous).Brown, "Privatizing the University - the New Tragedy of the Commons," Science 290 (December 1, 2000).How certain does science need to be to warrant action? There is no more controversial science today than that of global warming.On the one side, most of the scientific community affirms that human pollution is at least exacerbating an increase in temperature across the planet and that this could lead to major environmental and social effects.On the other, skeptics some of them prominent scientists - argue that the evidence for this remains sketchy, statistical (rather than causal) and interpretative.Here we look at the problems raised by this dispute, in particular about the statistical character of many scientific "facts.Lomborg, "The truth about the Environment," Economist, August 4, 2001."Misleading Math about the Earth," Scientific American, January 2002,6171.02: Science, Technology, and American Culture Summer Quarter 2007; TR 9:30 - 11:18 Instructor: Annette R.Dolph Office: Denney 461 Office Hours: TR.Office Phone: 292-1696 Coune Description" Goals: Mailbox: Denney 421(box is under my name) Email: email protected AIM: missliterature23 Comparative Studies 367.02 is an intennediate-level writing course that develops and extends skills in critical thinking and writing by asking students to analyze, discuss, and write about topics related to science and technology in the United States.

In this section of the course we will be looking specifically at the way in which culture and language construct and define what qualifies as "science" or "technology" and the ethical issues that may arise with the boundaries we draw.Using our course packet, we will examine and analyze the arguments, viewpoints, purposes, and overall rhetoric of various writers and artists to help us develop a more complex and nuanced conception of how "science" and "technology" are viewed in America, and how these labels may be more subjective and relative than we may initially perceive them to be.Your major papers will build in argumentative and rhetorical complexity, but all will involve drawing a conclusion of contemporary cultural, social, or personal relevance via the use of scholarly secondary sources and a careful rhetorical analysis of one or more writers we've read.As this is a writing course, you will be expected to complete multiple drafts and revisions of your major assignments, as well as to engage in regular more informal writing both in and out of class.02 also satisfies OSU's diversity requirement While this course is organized around the broad theme of science, technology, and the American experience, our readings encompass a wide variety of perspectives on how science and technology-and the ethical issues that arise from them-affect various cultures and communities within the United Stales.This quarter we will often find ourselves considering how race, gender, religion, and region may shape one's experience of scientific and technological advances for the better or worse.Required Texts Course packet available at Grade-A Notes (22 E.) A Writer's Handbook (suggested: A Writer's Reference by Diana Hacker, available at SBX--but any will suffice, including one you may have purcluised for English 110) Additional Required Materials: • There may be readings on Carmen which you must read in advance of class and must print out and bring to class on the day we discuss them.• An active email account through OSU (you are responsible for any class-related information I send to you through your OSU account, so make sure you check it frequently), Grade Distribution: Assignment 1 Assignment 2 Assignment 3 Discussion Leading" ODline Responses Class Participation & In-Ciass Writing 20% 25% 30% 15% 10% Draft policies: For each of your 3 major assignments, you will be required to submit a draft.On the indicated due date for a draft, you must bring a) TWO COPIES of your draft, and b) a paragraph which you indicate any problems or questions you have about the assignment and make other notes about your writing process (to be explained in class).Late drafts will not receive a full response from me due to the close proximity of draft deadlines to final version deadlines, so tum in your drafts on time.Failure to tmn in an assignment draft at all, or tmuing in a late draft, will result in the deduction of one-third of a letter grade on the final version of the paper (for example, B+ to B).

Further, as drafts are a part of a peer group exercise, failure to bring a draft on the day it is due will lower your participation grade.Drafts are expected to be full-length versions of your paper, unless otherwise indicated All final assignments 1tUISt be accompanied by your draft version with my comments on it.r Discussion Leading & Online Responses • Discussion Leading: For one class day, you will be assigned to lead class discussion of the readings for that day.To prepare for leading your discussion, you should a) summarize and analyze the author's major points, including any terms/definitions particularly important to that author; b) make note of important stylistic andlor rhetorical methods the author employs, and c) come up with 3 good questions for discussion of the reading.(More guidance on how to formuJate a "good'r discussion question will be given in class.) Step 1 must be posted on Carmen's discussion board by 5pm tbe day before the class period in whicb we discllss tbe readings.Come to class ready to present your summary and launch our discussion based upon your 3 critical discussion questions.

(The morning before class, you may want to log onto Carmen to see if .anyone bas posted a response to your SUIIUIJaI ' & questions, because it may help you lead discussion~ut you won't be held responsible for having done so.) More guidance on how to lead discussion will be offered in class.Step 1 and Step 2 together will count for half of this 15% segment of your grade.An unexcused absence on the day you are to lead discussion will result in an "E" for this portion of your grade.

• Online Responses to Discussion: During the quarter, you are responsible for posting 5 responses of approximately 250 words each as replies to what our discussion leader has written.You may post them for whichever readings you choose, with the additional condition that you must post at least 3 of theae 5 responses by mid-quarter (July 19).Each response must be posted before the class period in which we have the discussion-responses posted late will receive no credit.In these responses, you can develop, expand upon, disagree with, or otherwise engage with both the readings for the day and the points your peer or other responders have raised about them.

Make sure you print off and bring your response to class so you can refer to it to help you remember your ideas for discussion.

Responses will be evaluated credit/no credit, and completing all 5 responses thoroughly, thoughtfully, and on time will count for half of this 15% segment of your grade.Class Participation will be evaluated based upon active engagement in class discussion, completion of in

Late assignments will generally not be accepted; rarely, however, I may evaluate on a case-by

Attendance PoUcy: Attendance is important to the success of this class and to your development as a writer.Therefore, each unexcused absence after two will affect your grade, as will frequent tardiness.Five unexcused absences will automatically result in fallure for the coone.Excused absences, such as those for documented illness, family tragedy, religious observance, or travel for intercollegiate athletics, will not affect your grade.At the beginning of each class, I will pass around a sign-in sheet, which will act as the final authority on your presence or absence; it's your responsibility to make sure you 've signed it should you arrive late.

Mandatory Conferences: You mmt attend one mandatory conference with me to discuss your third assignment As this meeting stands in for one class session, failure to attend this conference will result in one class absence.Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious academic offense and will not be tolerated.The Committee on Academic Misconduct prohibits submitting plagiarized wolk for an academic assignment They define plagiarism as follows: Plagiarism is the representation of another's works or ideas as one's own; it includes the unacknowledged word for word use and/or paraphrasing of another person's work, andlor the inappropriate unacknowledged use of another person's ideas.Plagiarism is a breach of the OSU student code of conduct, and is punishable by failure of the course in which it • • occurs.If you are suspected of plagiarism, you will be referred to the University Committee on Academic • Misconduct.

We will discuss source documentation in class, and you can also refer to your writer's handbook's section on MLA documentationlplagiarism.Changes to Syllabus: I reserve the right to make changes to the syllabus or schedule of assignments/readings as I deem necessary to meet the needs of the class.No changes will be made without sufIjcient prior notice.Resources: Writing Center: The OSU Writing Center is available to provide:free, professional writing tutoring and consultation.You may set up an appointment by calling 688-4291 or by dropping by the center at 475 Mendenhall If you are interested in online writing advice, visit the OWL (Online Writing Lab) at .

Office of DisabUity Services: Located in ISO Pomerene Hall, this office offers services for students with documented disabilities.A Final Note: Success in this course is within your grasp; effort is half of the battle.Make sure you come to class, complete all assignments (including reading) on time, participate actively in class discussions, and make a serious effort toward improving your writing over the course of the quarter using the tools we practice, and you will likely do well.Please don't ever hesitate to contact me with questions or for additional help.

I'm here, after all, to share my experience with you and to help you gain as much as possIble from this course.During office hours, drop-ins are always welcome.Outside of office hours, email is usually the best way to contact me, followed by instant messenger (AIM).I will try to respond to emails within 24 hours whenever possible, particularly during the week.· Daily Schedule Comparative Studies 367.02 Note: Readings and assignments are due on the date under which they appear.Unit 1: Science, Nature, & Technology: Establishing Working Defmitions Week 1: Thematic Topics: Science, nature, and technology as cultural and social constructions Defining & discussing nature: a starting point for scientific & cultural debate Writing Topics: What makes "good writing"? What is "rhetoric"? Reading analytically (analysis vs.SUDlIDIIIY) T 6/19 Introduction to course, texts, and syllabus R 6/11 Ralph Waldo Emerson, from Nature (in-class: introduction to Assignment 1) Week 2: Thematic Topics: Drawing the boundary between "human" and "nature" Investigating the culturally constructed distinctions we make Writing Topics: Reading analytically, cont.

; Introduction to basic research skills; Formulating a good thesis statement T 6126 Carl Sagan, "Can We Know the Universe? Rdlections on a Grain of Salt" Charles Krauthammer, "Saving Nature, But Only for Man" R 6/28 Theodore Roosevelt, "Wilderness Reserves: Yellowstone Park" Ric,hard Connell, "A Most Dangerous Game" Week 3: Thematic Topics: How are our def"mi1ions of "technology" relative to our cultural moment? Writing Topics: The revision process; introductions & conclusions; grammar issues T 713 Esther Dyson, "Cyberspace: If You Don't Love it, Leave It" Draft Due of Assignment 1; bring two copies (in-class: writing workshop & peer review) R 715 Lewis Thomas, "The Technology of Medicine" Gilbert Arizaga, "Curanderismo as Holistic Medicine" ··optional supplemental reading: excerpt, "A Condensed HistOIy of Homeopathy" (in-class: drafts returned; common writing issues review) Unit 2: Science, Technology, & Ethics: Diverse Perspectives Week 4: Thematic Topics: Discrimination & the Environment; cultural ties with land and place Writing Topics: The rhetorical triangle; writing with audience in mind; calls to action (ethos, pathos, logos); thesis statements T 7/10 Tara Hulen, "Dispatch from Toxic Town" Winona LaDuke, "Nuclear Waste: Dumping on the Indians" Gregory Cajete, "Indigenous Foods, Indigenous Health: A Pueblo Perspective" (in-class: introduction to Assignment 2) R 7/12 Leslie Marmon Silko, "'Landscape, History, and the Pueblo Imagination" Assignment 1 Due Week S: Thematic Topics: Women, Technology, and the Environment Writing Topics: Thesis & thesis development, cont; linking evidence & claims; transitions between ideas; smoothly incorporating secondary sources T 7/17 Terry Tempe~t Williams, ""The Clan of the One-Breasted Women" Rachel Carson, "The Human Price" .'Facts'" Londa Schiebinger, "Has Feminism Changed Science?" Have at least 3 online responses done by this point (not including Your own discussion leading) Week 6: Thematic Topics: Religion & Culture Writing Topics: Logical fallacy & argumentative structure T 7124 Bertrand Russell, "The Value of Philosophy" Draft Due of Assignment 2; bring 2 copies (in-class: writing workshop and peer review) R 7126 Stephen L.Carter, "The Culture of Disbelief' Eliseo TOrre5, "Rituals and Practices of Traditional Folk Medicine in the US Southwest and Mexico" (in-class: drafts returned; common writing issues l-eview) Unit 3: Intersections of Science, Nature, & Technology in Contemporary American Culture Week 7: Thematic Topics: Technology & the VISUal Arts in America Writing Topics: kairos; art & film as rhetoric T 7131 Jennifer Price, "A Brief Natural History of the Plastic Pink Flamingo" (in-class: viewing of instalJat;on & multimedia art) (in-class: introduction of Assignment 3) R 8/2 Viewing ofTBA film (in-class) Assignment 2 Due Week 8: Thematic Topics: The Future of Science, Technology, & the Environment in the US Writing Topics: Style & the rhetorical triangle, revisited T 8n Peter Huber, "How Cities Green the Planet" Michael Pollan, "The Idea of a Garden" R 8/9 Isaac Asimov, ''The Last Question" Draft due of assignment 3; bring 2 copies (in-class: writing workshop and peer review) Week 9: Thematic Topics: Wrap-Up Writing Topics: TBA depending upon class needs T 8/14 Bring draft to class: style workshop R 8/16 Course wrap-up: Student-set agenda; Course evaluations (in-class: drafts returned; common writing issues review) Final versions of Assignment 3 due: Wed.

August 22 at 11:30 (more details on submission supplied in class) • BPf2.01 Science, Technology In a Global Setting DB 80, 930-11:18 Dr.

Nancy Jesser email protected Office Hours: MW 12-12:30 and by appt, 468 Hagerty Hall Please contact me through email if you need to contact me urgently.

If it's not urgent, you may leave a message at 292-0389.TEXTS Readings will be available on Carmen In PDF format Dr web-based Any student who feels he or she may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact me privately to discuss his or her specific needs.Please contact the Office for Disability Services at (614) 292-3307, or visit 150 Pomerene Hall, to coordinate reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities.COURSE OBJECTIVES We will analyze the intersection of values, scientific thought, and technological practice in a global setting.Over the term we will read about scientific and technical controverSies, histories of the use of science to support political ideologies and explore the technical and scientific approaches to social, political and environmental global issues.

We will be fOCUSing on how nature is articulated through science and mediated through human technical Interactions and how this affects our past, present, and future.Through critical analyses of scientific and technological issues we will seek neither to vilify nor glorify SCientific-technological practice, but rather demystify and engage with It.Specifically students will examine the technical and scientific challenges facing the planet.Some key questions we will explore are: • How are SCientific knowledges and practices related to the cultural situations and historical moments in which they are produced and enacted? • How are decisions and arguments about the uses and dangers of technology made and how are these decisions justified? • What is the relationship between the globalization of SCience, transnational bUSiness, conflicts over values and the conditions of life on this planet? • How are local, national, and ruling/hegemonic group's undertakings affected by disparate access to scientific knowledge and technological resources? • How are scientific and technological practices changing? Through specific global issues, student groups will examine the context and implications of political, social, technical and scientific decisions that shape the future of human SOCieties and nature.REQUIREMENTS IN-(lASS: In order to foster class participation, regular attendance and accountability for assigned readings, in addition to discussion there be short in-class writings and occasional short quizzes--neither extenSive, nor time-consuming (5-10 mins).

You will be rewarded for your attention to the readings and your attendance.If you need any special accommodations, please let me know at the beginning of the term.In-class writing assignments/quizzes will relate to that day's assigned reading.• After two missed dasses, your participation grade will begin to be negatively affected.' • • LATE ASSIGNMENTS: Late assignments will lose 5 pts, and then 5 more for every class period after that.Short papers will not be accepted more than a week.There can be no late finals! Articles will be accepted only in class on due date.ATTENDANCE and PARTICIPATION Attendance is mandatory and especially important in a discussion-centered course.

Absences in excess of two classes may jeopardize your final grade no matter the quality of your other work.The class will spend a substantial amount of time discussing the readings and topics as a class and In smaller groups.The atmosphere will be casual, open, but intellectually rigorous.If you feel someone is detracting from this atmosphere seriously or intentionally, please bring It to my attention.

A respectful and questioning attitude is crucial for successful discussion.The readings are difficult and sometimes controversial and disturbing; class discussions will help you to formulate and clarify your thoughts on the readings and to understand the positions others take.The issues of difference and diversity we discuss will be particularly and personally Important to you and others in the class.Because we are engaging directly in issues that have social and political relevance, it Is crucIal that we take this seriously as well as behave respectfully, even as we question or challenge each other's views-this includes me.Class discussions are an opportunity to explore the author's Idea's relevance to your own personal and intellectual experiences.

It Is likely that you will be challenged or even upset by something said or read In this classroom.These Ideas need to be brought into the dlscusslon--opened to respectful questioning and disagreement.If you do not feel you can bring them up, I encourage you make an appointment to discuss them with me.FINAL GRADES In-Class (in-class writings, participation, quizzes, clippings) Group Presentation Short Papers Final Essay 15% 15% 40% 30% You are expected to know, understand and adhere to the Student Code of Academic Conduct.maliciously documented or without proper attrlbution-- may result in a hearing before the academic misconduct committee.If you have any doubts about whether you have properly documented and attributed the Ideas and words of others In your work, feel free to consult me.If you do not know the code of academic conduct, see web site: /resource PLEASE TALK TO ME NOW IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS ABOUT COURSE REQUIREMENTS OR MY EXPECTATIONS • Week Eight: Problems/Solutions May 12: "Predictions: Technology of the New Century and the New Millenium," and "case Study 2: The Development and Progress of the Ambitious UN 2000 Millennium Project" , by Barbara Eichler, from Technology and Society May 14: "Environmental Challenges Go Global" and "The Eightfold Way" excerpts from Speth, Red Sky at morning: America and the crisis of the Global Environment Week Nine: Groups Present Global Problem, Context and assessing SCientific/Technical "Solutions" May 19: Groups 1 and 2 Paper Due Date no.3 (Readings May 5-May 14) May 21: Groups 3 and 4 Week Ten May 26: No CLASS May 38: Groups 5 and 6 EEOB 210: LOCAL FLORA – Spring 2008 Instructor: Cynthia Dassler Museum of Biological Diversity, Herbarium, Room 1350L E-mail: email protected Telephone: office: 292-3296 cell phone: 403-8321 Office Hours: By appointment.

Lecture in Rm 1120 (Auditorium) and Labs in Rm 1000, Museum of Biological Diversity Your GTA’s: Jessica Miesel MW 9:30 am - 12:18 pm ph.292-9373 256 Aronoff Lab email protected Office hrs by appt Michael Broe TR 10:30 am - 1:18 pm ph.292-0501 366 Aronoff Lab email protected Office hrs by appt Please feel free to arrange a time to meet with me, Michael or Jessica, if you have questions or need additional help outside of class.The Plants of Pennsylvania, An Illustrated Manual.University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, PA.Also required: A 10× or 14× hand lens (10x lens is $14.95); a lab notebook, and a spiral-bound 8” x 5” notebook for field notes.Recommended: One or two pairs of watch-maker’s #5 tweezers - $3.Hand lens and forceps are available at Werkhaven William and Son Inc.

The store has no sign, but has the number marked.Tell them you are from Cynthia Dassler’s class from OSU.

Master the use of dichotomous keys, plant descriptions, and floras.Learn the characteristics of the most common plant families in Ohio.Learn the morphological and taxonomic vocabulary of plants.Gain an understanding of plant communities in Ohio and historical factors that have contributed to the distribution of species within the state.

Learn how to adequately collect and press plants for scientific use.Written material for the class will be on the Carmen website.Some of the material you will need to print ahead of time.This course emphasizes extensive field experience and on-sight identification, thus it is absolutely essential that you keep up with the information covered in class on a daily basis.

Learning plants and the terminology to describe them is like learning a foreign language—much memorization and practice are necessary.Thus, you will have weekly quizzes and daily assignments.You will need additional time in the lab to complete assignments and study the material.Local flora is taught both in the lab and in the field.Field trips will take place to off-campus sites and around campus.

Additionally, there are four Saturday/Sunday field trips offered, two to Cedar Bog and two to Deep Woods.Two field trips are required: one to Cedar Bog and one to Deep Woods – both are very cool places and will be totally different each time we visit them! Any extra weekend field trips you attend (and I encourage you to do so) will earn you 10 points bonus each.On class field trips and for weekend field trips, you will need appropriate shoes/boots, long pants, hat/sunglasses/sunscreen, rain gear, hand lens, field notebook, pencil, and The Plants of Pennsylvania.Also, bring lots of water, and a snack/lunch, if needed.

We will go outside for many of the lab periods.

Come to every lab dressed for fieldwork, even if it is not listed on the syllabus.We are on the plants’ blooming schedules.Disabilities Statement: In accordance with OSU policy and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), academic accommodations may be made for any student registered with the Office of Disability Services (ODS).Please contact ODS at 292-1760 for additional information.

Go to college active course catalog university of arizona

urse Schedule Date Lecture Lab day ch 24 Course introduction; plant communities; plant classification Plant morphology and terminology Flower and Fruit morphology Flower and Fruit morphology – Let’s eat! dnesdayMarch 26 Homework H due date W/R Mar.26/27 • fill-in-blank descriptions (x2) • circle-terms description • paragraph description • lab activity M/T Mar.1 Collecting and pressing Quiz 1; Lifecycles, ferns and lycopods Herbarium tour; pressing; keying Ferns and lycopods day il 7 Gymnosperms dnesday April 9 Quiz 2; Angiosperm Field Trip – lifecycle and classification Map reading; gluing techniques Chadwick Arboretum (no collecting) Field Trip – Fishinger site Quiz 3; Angiosperm Basal Angiosperms, Basal Eudicots keying Gymnosperms day March 31 dnesday April 2 day April 14 dnesday April 16 day April 21 dnesday April 23 day il 27 day April 28 W/R Apr Best website to order college ecology coursework Formatting A4 (British/European) University Academic.1 Collecting and pressing Quiz 1; Lifecycles, ferns and lycopods Herbarium tour; pressing; keying Ferns and lycopods day il 7 Gymnosperms dnesday April 9 Quiz 2; Angiosperm Field Trip – lifecycle and classification Map reading; gluing techniques Chadwick Arboretum (no collecting) Field Trip – Fishinger site Quiz 3; Angiosperm Basal Angiosperms, Basal Eudicots keying Gymnosperms day March 31 dnesday April 2 day April 14 dnesday April 16 day April 21 dnesday April 23 day il 27 day April 28 W/R Apr.

7/8 • fern and lycopod key • keying W/R Apr.9/10 • gymnosperm table • keying lifecycle and classification Angiosperm families keying W/R Apr.16/17 • press plants • create labels for Fishinger site M/T Apr Should i purchase an coursework ecology A4 (British/European) British MLA Writing.16/17 • press plants • create labels for Fishinger site M/T Apr.21/22 • lab activity • keying • finalized labels for Fishinger site Field Trip – Ohio School for the Deaf M/T Apr.14/15 • process OSD specimens • labels for OSD site W/R Apr.

23/24 • Fishinger due Quiz 4; Angiosperm M/T Apr.28/29 Basal Rosids, Core Rosid, Eurosids I; • lab activity • keying process OSD specimens no collecting allowed Field Trip – Cedar Bog 9:00 am – 3:00 pm Cost is $3.00 to enter Preserve bring field lunch labels for OSU wetland site W/R Apr.30/ Angiosperm families Field Trip – OSU May 1, wetland families X • OSD due dnesday il 30 urday 3 day May 5 dnesdayMay 7 urday 10 M/T May 5/6 Exam 1 Eurosid II, Basal Asterids, Euasterid I; process wetland specimens Field Trip – Deep Woods: Spring wildflowers and trees 9:00 am – 5:00 pm bring field lunch Angiosperm families, Field Trip – Batelle Asteraceae Darby Creek Metro Park Quiz 5; Angiosperm Euasterid II; process Batelle Darby families, Monocots specimens Field Trip – Cedar Bog 9:00 am – 3:00 pm Cost is $3.00 to enter • lab activity • keying labels for Deep Woods site W/R May 7/8 labels for Batelle Darby site W/R May 7/8, • Wetlands due M/T May 12/13 • lab activity • keying no collecting allowed X Preserve bring field lunch Angiosperm families: Monocots, Cyperaceae day May 12 Field Trip – Prairie labels for Prairie Oaks site Oaks Metro Park W/R May 14/15, • Batelle due • 1st Deep Woods due TENTATIVE SYLLABUS EEOB 322 INTRODUCTION TO ORNITHOLOGY SPRING QUARTER 2009 JOHN M.

CONDIT Telephone: (614) 292-0543 FAX: (614) 292-7774 e-mail: email protected Room 1540 Museum of Biological Diversity The Ohio State University 1315 Kinnear Road 43212-1192 LECTURES: M,W & Th, the Auditorium (room 1120), The Museum of Biological Diversity LABORATORIES: M&W and Tu&Th.Indoor labs in the bird Range (room 1700) of the Museum.Outdoor labs in the field, OSU Campus, Tuttle Park, and the Wetlands Area.THE SIBLEY GUIDE TO BIRD LIFE & BEHAVIOR, Alfred A.BIRDS OF EASTERN AND CENTRAL UNITED STATES.5 th Edition, Houghton-Mifflin, Boston LECTURES: Mon Wed Thu 30 Mar 1 Apr 2 Apr Introduction Implications thru Plumage & Age (15-21) Aerodynamics thru wing shape (21-24) Mon Wed Thu 6 Apr 8 Apr 9 Apr Feet, bills, digestive thru bones & muscles (24-30) Respiration & metabolism thru eyes (30-34) Hearing thru problem solving (34-37) Mon Wed Thu 13 Apr 15 Apr 16 Apr The origin of birds (39-44) Classification I (44-50) Classification II (44-50) Mon Wed Thu 20 Apr 22 Apr 23 Apr Study of behavior (51-55) Feeding & locomotion, concealment (55-59) Migration I (59-65) Mon Wed Thu 27 Apr 29 Apr 30 Apr Migration II (59-65) MIDTERM Dispersal (65-68) Mon Wed Thu 4 May 6 May 7 May Displays using sound (68-71) Monogamy thru polygamy (71-75) Lekking, other breeding behavior (75-79) Mon Wed 11 May 13 May Biogeography & birds of the world Habitats (80-86) Thu 14 May Forest and woodlands (86-92) Mon Wed Thu 18 May 20 May 21 May Grassland and scrublands (92-95) Deserts and tundra (95-100) Wetlands & aquatic habitats, Human created habitats (100-106) Mon Wed Thu 25 May 27 May 28 May MEMORIAL DAY Populations thru abiotic factors (107-112) Populations regulation thru brood parasites (112-116) Mon 1 Jun Pollution thru climatic change (116-118) Wed 3 Jun North American bird populations (119-120) Thu 4 Jun Final Review Tentative Syllabus, page 2 (Spring Quarter 2009) LABORATORY EXERCISES: There are TWO, two hour labs per week.Monday & Wednesday and Tuesday & Thursday PLEASE CHECK CLASS LIST TO SEE WHAT LABORATORIES YOU ARE ASSIGNED.

Each student will have one INDOOR lab in Room 1700 and one OUTDOOR lab per week.No labs are CANCELLED because of weather, except for thunderstorms.INDOOR LABS: 1st week 30 Mar Skeleton, topography, feathers, wings, feet, nest, eggs & etc.2nd week 6 Apr Orders Anseriformes and Galliformes 3rd week 13 Apr Orders Gaviiformes through Falconiformes 4th week 20 Apr Orders Gruiformes through Charadriiformes 5th week 27 Apr Biogeography and Distribution demonstrations 6th week 4 May Orders Columbiformes through Piciformes Other miscellaneous demonstrations 7th week 11 May Order Passeriformes, Families Tyrannidae through Sturnidae 8th week 18 May Order Passiformes, Families Vireonidae through Passeridae 9th week 25 May OUTDOOR FINAL PRACTICAL EXAM Indoor lab – Final Review of Avian material 10th week 1 Jun FINAL INDOOR PRACTICAL EXAM Mon & Wed labs on Wednesday 28th May Tues & Thurs on Tuesday 27th May – NO OUTDOOR LABS FINAL EXAM (all students) MONDAY 8 June 2008 at 0730-0918? TENTATIVE GRADE SCALE * 100 – 92 = A 91-85 = B 84-75 = C 74-65 = D 64 – below = E TENTATIVE POINT DISTRIBUTION* LECTURE (50%) Midterm & Final (45%) Lecture quizzes (5%) LABORATORY (50%) Outdoor labs (20%) Quizzes (5%) Final Practical (15%) Indoor labs (30%) Quizzes (5%) Final Practical (25%) * The instructor reserves the right to modify this grade scale and point distribution EEOB 322 – INTRODUCTION TO ORNITHOLOGY Spring Quarter 2009 MORNING OUTDOOR FIELD TRIPS – 0730-0913 TAS: 1.

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE WEEK OF: MEET @: 30 Mar 6 Apr 13 Apr 20 Apr 27 Apr 4 May 11 May 18 May 25 May Museum of Biological Diversity Front steps of Jenning’s Hall, Neil Avenue OSU Wetlands (by ARC Industries) on Ackerman Road / W.Dodridge St North side of OSU Ice Rink, Lane Avenue Agronomy (University) woodlot, north of Waterman Farm Complex OSU Wetlands (by ARC Industries) on Ackerman Road / W.Dodridge St Agronomy (University) woodlot, north of Waterman Farm Complex North side of OSU Ice Rink, Lane Avenue OUTDOOR PRACTICAL EXAM (to be announced) These locations are subject to change based on bird migration and where the class will have the best opportunity to see the most species of birds.

BE PREPARED FOR LAB!! - We will be in the field no matter what the weather, so dress appropriately - Feet will get wet and muddy.Please CLEAN ones shoes (boots) before entering The Museum of Biological Diversity - Bring a SMALL field notebook and pencil to take notes - Individual are responsible to furnish THEIR own pair of BINOCULARS, 7x35 or 8x40 - Be ON TIME.We will not weait - Be prepared to walk fast.An hour and one-half is not much time - Be ALERT.

You can not see birds by being asleep or chattering with another student! You CAN NOT MASTER bird identification by sight and sound by being in the field just for outdoor labs.

You need to spend additional time during the week observing birds.If you would like to know of other areas around Central Ohio to observe birds see the instructor or the graduate students.COURSE OUTLINE – EEOB 370 (EXTINCTION), Spring 2008 Lead instructors: GTAs: Katy Greenwald Sarah Corey Office: 356 Aronoff Office hours: by appointment e­mail: email protected Office: 284 Aronoff Office hours: TBA and by appointment e­mail: email protected Julianne Mills Office: 384 Aronoff Office hours: by appointment e­mail: email protected Jonathan Hall Office: 284 Aronoff Office hours: Tuesdays, noon ‘til class e­mail: email protected Course requirements – There is no required text for this course.All required readings will be available on Carmen as PDFs.You may also enjoy (optional) CD: Wilson, E.

Island Press Who can explain why one species ranges widely and is very numerous, and why another allied species has a narrow range and is rare? — C.Darwin (1859) Suddenly, as rare things will, the species vanished.“The balance of nature” does not exist and perhaps never has existed.Elton (1930) There is unfortunately no precedent for 6 billion human beings suddenly sharing an enlightened vision of the future.There are no hopeless cases, only people without hope and expensive cases.Soul (1987) Tropical deforestation is thought to be causing species extinctions at a recordsetting pace.Familiar estimates are on the order of several extinctions per hour — in tropical forest ecosystems alone! These “guesstimates” are based on species­area relationships combined with estimates of current rates of deforestation.These gloomy predictions serve the purpose of catching the public’s attention.

But do they make us skeptical and jaded or do they galvanize our joint interest in retarding the rate of global extinction.We will explore some of the causes of, and potential remedies to, the loss of biodiversity on Earth today.We will also explore ways of improving estimates of current (and future) extinction rates.Throughout the course, we will discuss the underlying ecological and evolutionary basis of extinction, the role of humans as causal agents, and the prospects for conserving biodiversity in the face of a burgeoning human population.We will address the following questions.

If almost all species that have ever existed are now extinct, do we really need to worry about extinction? If human activity is causing, say, 30,000 global species extinctions per year, why is it that we can account for only a few of these species by name? Why are so many current extinctions cryptic? Are they really occurring? How does today’s global extinction event compare with historical extinction events? Should we console ourselves with the extinctionisinevitable argument? Will the global biota rebound? Will we humans still be here if and when it does? What are the ethics of extinction? What makes some species so rare in the first place? Are some species and ecosystems especially vulnerable to extinction? Are some taxa especially vulnerable? Do local extinctions really lead to ecosystem decay? Is biodiversity conservation really all about real estate? What are the problems facing small populations? Which kind of random element — demographic, environmental, or genetic — pushes dwindling populations into the extinction vortex? Do “bad genes” cause extinction? How are extinction rates assessed? To what degree can we improve these assessments? What is the role of extinction in the evolutionary process? What do population dynamic principles tell us about extinction risk? How should endangerment be assessed and how should such assessments be translated into conservation plans? Can we really bring species back from the brink? Which species should we save? Why do assessments of species endangerment ignore >99% of all species? What is the role of the human “population bomb” in the endangerment of species? How large is our ecological footprint and how can we tread lightly? Why do attempts to exploit populations sustainably routinely fail? Why is the overexploitation of communal resources so pervasive? Is there an evolutionary basis for the failure of so many conservation efforts? If so, how can we exploit this insight? Why save biodiversity? How can you contribute toward solving the global extinction crisis? Organizational details – Class will be held biweekly, 3:30­4:48 PM.During these sessions, we will participate in: ♣ Participatory quasi­lectures ♣ Seminar­style discussions, debates, town meetings, stakeholders meetings, break­out discussion groups, etc.During the early portion of the course, we will rely primarily on the quasi­lecture mode.However, as the class gains a general level of proficiency, we will explore recent advances in the biology of extinction through alternative approaches (listed above).We will discuss primary literature, which will require careful preparation by each of us.

Readings and assignments will be posted on the course webpage.Statement on diversity– We the instructors embrace the university’s mission regarding diversity (visit the Dept.of EEOB’s Diversity website to learn more: ­ /~eeob/div ).We are committed to the goals of creating a welcoming climate for all students and promoting a shared, inclusive understanding of diversity.If you have any concerns about diversity­related issues, you should feel free report your concerns to: ­ /.

Statement on disability– We will gladly attempt to accommodate any student who may have special needs or concerns.Any student who may need an accommodation for the impact of a disability should contact Katy or Julie to discuss specific needs.For support services, please contact the Office for Disability Services (292­3307), 150 Pomerene Hall.Statement on academic integrity – The Ohio State University’s Code of Student Conduct (Section 3335­23­04) defines academic misconduct as: “Any activity that tends to compromise the academic integrity of the University, or subvert the educational process.” Examples of academic misconduct include (but are not limited to) plagiarism, collusion (unauthorized collaboration), copying the work of another student, and possession of unauthorized materials during an examination.

Ignorance of the University’s Code of Student Conduct is never considered an “excuse” for academic misconduct.If we suspect that a student has committed academic misconduct in this course, we are obligated by University Rules to report our suspicions to the Committee on Academic Misconduct.If COAM determines that you have violated the University’s Code of Student Conduct, the sanctions for the misconduct could include a failing grade in this course and suspension or dismissal from the University.You will find that this course offers ample opportunity for collaboration and that joint efforts will often be encouraged.

However, certain assignments will require that you do your OWN work.

If you have any question as to whether your level of cooperation with your peers or the similarity of your work to that of others is acceptable, you must contact an instructor to discuss the matter BEFORE handing in the assignment.Statement on email communication – We encourage the use of email for communication with your instructors and TAs.However, you should be aware of the following: 1) We will not be available to answer email 24 hours a day.Therefore, pressing questions emailed after business hours the day before an exam/assignment due date may or may not receive a response before the next class meeting.Likewise, emails sent after close of business on Friday may not receive a response until the following Monday.

2) Certain questions/concerns may be inappropriate or too complicated to answer by email.In such cases, we reserve the right to request that you make an appointment to discuss these matters with an instructor face­to­face.3) You are expected to exercise common courtesy in all email communication.Disrespectful, rude, aggressive, discriminatory, offensive, or defamatory comments of any kind will not be tolerated.Grading Procedures – Grades will be based on the following scheme.

Final grades may be adjusted based on relative performance, but students with a composite score equaling or exceeding 90, 80, or 70% can expect to receive a grade no lower than A­, B­, or C, respectively.Required components – 25 points: 10 points: 25 points: 50 points: 100 points: 40 points: SPAR Assignment Ecofootprint Assignment Bushmeat Assignment Midterm Exam Final Exam Class participation (includes attendance, evidence of preparation, active contribution to cooperative exercises, and verbal contribution during in­class discussions) Total = 250 points Notes on these components: Exams will be given in class and may cover material from lectures/quasi­lectures, reading assignments, and in­ class discussions.Exams may include a take­home component, which may include any or all of the following: assessment of extinction rates, written critique of primary literature, and analysis/interpretation of extinction risk.Class participation refers to meaningful participation in all in­class activities and may include written preparation for in­class discussions.(Detailed explanation to be given in class.

) Consistent preparation and active participation are expected.Course Schedule Week Date Topic Readings Living Planet Report, p 14­27; SPAR Assignment due Our ecological footprint and biodiversity conservation Yu & Liu 2007 T (4/15) Global climate change and biodiversity loss Biotic holocaust Midgley et al.2002; Waite & Strickland 2006 Footprint assignment due Saving the precious few Taylor 1995; Brook et al.2000 T (4/22) Earth Day ­­ Can we defy Nature’s end? The eternal optimist Adams et al.1999 Research talks (if nothing on Earth Day) Bushmeat assignment due T (4/29) Optional help session (regular time and place) MIDTERM EXAM T (5/6) Bushmeat and the extinction crisis Colishaw et al.2005 Inbreeding and extinction Saccheri et al.1998 T (5/13) Biodiversity and ecosystem function, Part 1 Naeem et al.1999; Naeem 2000 Biodiversity and ecosystem function, Part 2 Loreau et al.2001; Pfisterer and Schmid 2002; Naeem 2002 T (5/20) Hotspots and evolutionary history Sechrest et al.2002; Spathelf & Waite 2007 Diffusing the human population bomb Meffe et al.1993 T (5/27) Sustainable consumption and biodiversity conservation (Take­home FINAL assigned) Myers 2000; Srinivasan et al.2008 R (5/29) 10 How much green stuff do we use? R (5/22) 9 T (4/8) R (5/15) 8 Brooks et al.

1999 R (5/8) 7 Extending the species­area approach R (5/1) 6 Estimating the extinction event R (4/24) 5 T (4/1) R (4/17) 4 Rarity, causes of biodiversity loss R (4/10) 3 The biodiversity crisis: fact or fiction? R (4/3) 2 T (3/25) R (3/27) 1 Economic reasons for saving wild nature The conservationist’s cause for optimism Biodiversity conservation: getting involved Balmford et al.2008 Finals T (6/3) Week TAKE HOME DUE by NOON EEOB 502 ­ PLANTS AND PEOPLE Living Planet Report, p 1­11; Manne & Pimm 2001 The botany and history of the world’s food, spice, drug and industrial plants Spring Quarter 2009 Instructor: Dr.Kobinah Abdul-Salim 316 Aronoff Laboratory Phone: (614) 247-8857 Email: email protected Diamond, J.Guns, germs, and steel: the fates of human societies.Jungle botanist (Richard Evans Schultes).Office Hours: Tues 10:30-11:30 AM, Thursday 3:30-4:30 PM, or by appointment.Prerequisites: 5 credits hours in biological sciences or consent of instructor.

Goals for this Course: • To examine the direct interrelations between humans and plants, and their evolutionary (for plants) and cultural (for humans) consequences.• To gain an understanding of the process of plant and animal domestication, from both an evolutionary and an ecological perspective.• To study the origin and subsequent dispersal of the major food and beverage plants appearing in our diets today.• To appreciate the importance of plant biodiversity in our cultural history as well as in our culinary history.• To explore alternative world views as experienced by aboriginal peoples and mediated through their use of plants.

• To continue to develop skills in written and oral communication.Required Textbook: Levetin, Estelle and Karen McMahon.(ISBN 0077221257) Other Assigned Readings (Available online via CARMEN): Furst, P.General administrative policies: Your mastery of the course objectives will be assessed via the midterm and final examinations, as well as a group project consisting of a series of written, oral, and practical components.Exam dates are indicated on the schedule (last page of this syllabus).Each test will be worth 100 points, and will include a combination of short answers and definitions, short essay questions, and interpretative problems.The group project will take place in several phases over the course of the quarter, and will be worth 100 points.A complete description of this project will be posted to the Carmen website in the first week.

Every effort will be made to accommodate students with special needs, but we need to be informed of the situation right away.The Office of Disability Services ( /) offers facilities for students requiring extra time on exams and/or a separate, quiet testtaking environment.150 Pomerene Hall (1760 Neil Avenue), and students requiring their services should obtain a form as early in the quarter as possible, to be signed by Dr.Lecture Outlines: Outlines for the week’s material (in pdf format) will be posted to the course’s Carmen website on Mondays (or sooner).They are intended to make it easier for you to stay organized and to be focused on what happens in class, but are in no way a substitute for class attendance.Attendance: Attendance is expected, and it is in your best interest to attend class regularly.Given the breadth and diversity of material covered in this course, you simply WILL NOT succeed in this course if you do not attend the lectures.

Despite all best efforts, there may be instances where an absence is necessary.

If you have legitimate, documentable reasons why you need to miss tests, extend deadlines on assignments, or otherwise require some special consideration, you must alert Dr.Abdul-Salim as soon as possible, and provide appropriate written documentation.Any circumstance that can be foreseen in advance (e., religious holiday, interview for med or vet school, etc.

) should be dealt with RIGHT AWAY so that we can do our best to come up with an alternative that suits your situation.Athletics-related absences must be arranged by the end of the second week of class, and require a letter from your coach or athletic director.Grades: Your final course grade will be based on points accrued out of a total of 300 points, distributed as follows: Grade Item Midterm Exam Final Exam Group Project TOTAL Points 100 Points 100 Points 100 Points 300 Points Academic Misconduct: The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors are REQUIRED by the Ohio State University to report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the Committee on Academic Misconduct (Faculty Rule 3335-5487).It is the responsibility of the Committee to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.

Any form of academic misconduct, no matter how seemingly small, will not be tolerated in this course.Unless indicated on an assignment, problems sets and take-home material are expected to be the ultimate product of the student handing in the assignment.Students are expected to adhere to the university’s honor code or else suffer the consequences.For additional information, please refer to (1) the Code of Student Conduct ( /resource ), with special reference to the sections regarding academic misconduct, and (2) a very through FAQ (“frequently asked questions”) at the website of the Committee on Academic Misconduct ( /coam/ ).Recommended Resources A useful web site directory of links to ethno-botanical and related resources.

Guns, germs, and steel: the fates of human societies.Foraging and Farming: the Evolution of Plant Exploitation.

Plant identification terminology : an illustrated glossary.Spring Lake Publishing, Spring Lake, UT.The Cambridge illustrated glossary of botanical terms.Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.H53 2000 BPL REFERENCE) RECOMMENDED! Johns, T.Plants of the Gods: Origins of Hallucinogenic Use.(QK99 A1 S39 BPL – On Reserve) Simpson, B.(SB108 U5 S56 BPL - On Reserve) RECOMMENDED! Viola, H.Domestication of Plants in the Old World: the Origin and Spread of Cultivated Plants in West Asia, Europe, and the Nile Valley.(GN799 A4 Z64 AGI) Lecture schedule and reading assignments Theme Wk Date Lecture Topic Readings Introduction: 1 31 Mar Introduction/essential botany 2 Apr Origins of agriculture Text, chap.

6 Going Beyond Hunting and Gathering: Origins of cultivated plants and animal 2 7 Apr domestication 9 Apr The Big Four - Wheat & Maize J.

236-239) The Botanical Basis To Civilization: 3 14 Apr The Big Four – Rice & Sorghum; other grains 16 Apr Proteins From Plants - Legumes Text, chap.245247, 254-255) Alternatives to Cereal Grains:` 4 21 Apr Starchy Staples - The Potato Text, chap.250) More Starchy Staples – Banana, Yuca, and other 23 Apr crops Improving Upon Carbohydrates: 5 Text, chap.24 28 Apr Alcoholic Beverages - Wine & Spirits; Beer (pp.428-443) 30 Apr • MIDTERM EXAMINATION • 1:30-3:18 PM Exploiting Botanical Diversity I: 6 7 Text, chap.280-287); 5 May Spice Plants, the Spice Islands, and History I & II supplemental readings TBA 7 May Sweetness and Power - Sugar Cane Text, chap.157); Mintz article Big Hits From the New World - Tomato & 12 May Peppers 14 May Stimulating Beverages - Coffee & Tea 8 Text, chap.264-272); supplemental readings TBA Text, chap.272-276); 19 May Theobroma: Food of the Gods (a.chocolate) supplemental readings TBA 21 May The Mediterranean diet: olives, figs, & dates Readings TBA (Carmen) The Mind, The Body, & The Spirit: Medicinal Plants; The Old World Pharmacopoeia 9 26 May - Hemp & Opium Text, chap.352-361); Furst 28 May The New World Pharmacopoeia - Coca & 96 Tobacco; Entheogens 1-Peyote Entheogens II-Psilocybe & Caapi; Fibers; 10 2 June Fragrance & Dye Plants Home, Hearth, & Industry: Wood & Paper; Rubber & Resins; group 4 June presentations article Text, chap.310-321) 11 June • FINAL EXAMINATION • 1:30-3:18 PM INTRODUCTION TO ECOLOGY Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology 503.Boerner 280 Aronoff Laboratory Telephone: 292-6179 email: email protected Dr.

Ludsin 232 Aquatic Ecology Laboratory Telephone: 292-6208 email: email protected COURSE MEETINGS Lecture: Tuesday and Thursday 8:30-9:48 AM, Room 1184 Postle Hall (College of Dentistry) Recitation: One hour on Tuesday, Thursday or Friday in Jennings 0130 or 0136.Elements Concepts and Applications, 4th edition.Available at University Bookstore and other campus area bookstores.MATERIALS POSTED ON Carmen On the EEOB 503.01 Carmen site you will find this syllabus, lecture outlines, supplemental lecture materials, lists of study questions, examples of questions from past exams and the grades you earn through the quarter.

Unless otherwise noted, you are welcome to download materials from the 503 Carmen site and print them for your personal use.DESIGNATED INSTRUCTOR All students in EEOB 503.01 will work with a specific instructor, usually the person who teaches your recitation section.You should be sure to note the name of the instructor to whom you’ve been assigned and how he/she can be contacted.97 Your instructor can help you with difficult lecture material and serve as your contact within the course.

You must include your instructor’s name on every assignment you submit as part of this course.He/she will be intimately involved in the grading of your exams, your seminar summaries (and your lab reports if you are taking the lab course).Taking the time to get to know him/her will both enrich your experience in EEOB 503.It will give your instructor insight into how you think and reason, and that may be helpful when he/she grades your exams and assignments.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Course Structure Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology (EEOB) 503.Reading assignments for the lecture are all from the course text, as shown on the lecture schedule and reading assignment page.01, the lecture course, is taught by Drs.

Ludsin in collaboration with Graduate Teaching Associates from the Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology.All of the Graduate Teaching Associates involved in this course are working towards graduate degrees in ecology or evolutionary biology.These instructors bring their talent and experiences to bear in making the course an exciting, thought-provoking experience, and to aid students not taking the lab portion in making their learning experience as rich as possible.First, they will give each student a weekly opportunity to ask questions and have clarified for them material from the lectures and text readings.Second, we will use some of the recitations to give students handson practice with mathematical models of ecological phenomena.Although no graded assignments will take place in the recitations, your success in EEOB 503.01 will be enhanced by your participation in the weekly recitations.02, the independent lab portion of this course, is designed to complement EEOB 503.01, and we recommend the two be taken concurrently.02 will include experiments, demonstrations, problems, and discussion of journal papers, and are designed to enrich and supplement material covered in lecture and the textbook.Please note that no student who is taking only the lecture course will be held responsible for material covered only in the lab course.

02 will require data analysis and a written summary of the results to be prepared outside of class.A separate syllabus for the lab course will be given out the first day of lab.01 will be determined on the basis of 400 points, allocated to three lecture exams (two midterms and a final, 100 points each) and three seminar summaries (25, 35, and 40 points).

Exams There will be three lecture exams, each of which is worth 100 points.Exams are composed of primarily of questions that require written answers of 1-5 sentences (i.To give you an idea of the types of questions we ask, a sample of questions from old exams is posted on Carmen.

Ecology is a quantitative science, so some exams will include problems.98 You will be given an opportunity after your graded exams are returned to request that certain questions be re-graded and point deductions reassessed.The procedure for exam re-grading is as follows: After you receive your graded exam, consult the posted exam key to determine how/why your answers differed from those we sought; For each question you believe should be re-graded, assemble a paragraph describing why you feel your answer deserves more points than were assigned.Your rationale should refer to material from the text and lectures in defense of your view.

Submit your re-grading request and your original exam to Dr.Boerner no later than one week after the exam was returned to you.Seminar Summaries You will write and submit three seminar summaries during the quarter.The seminar summaries will be based on invited seminars on ecological topics that you attend and summarize in one page, well-constructed essays.As we expect your summaries will improve with practice, each successive summary will carry more credit.

Seminar Summary I is worth 25 points, Summary II is worth 35 points, and Summary III is worth 40 points.These summaries should demonstrate to the instructor that you understood the basics of the science presented, and that you can communicate the topic and major findings of the research being discussed.We will also require that you relate that information to topics we cover in our lectures and readings.A template you should use in preparing your seminar summaries can be downloaded from our Carmen site.Seminar series offered by EEOB, the Environmental Sciences Graduate Program (ESGP), Natural Resources, and other departments and programs may be used, as long as the topic covered is predominantly ecological (a partial listing of weekly seminar series can be found in the same Carmen file that has the seminary summary template).

Be aware that many seminars that deal with environmental issues may not be ecological in nature, and full credit for seminar summaries is only possible when the topics are clearly related to the principles and practice of ecology.If you are unsure as to whether a given seminar will qualify as ecological, check with Dr.Unexcused late submissions will be penalized 20% per day, beginning with the end of the class period in which the summary was to be submitted.Make-up Exams Make-up exams will be given only if the student must miss the regularly scheduled exam due to (1) a university-organized or university-sanctioned event or (2) a medical or family emergency.

In the case of a university-organized or-sanctioned event, the student must submit appropriate documentation no later than 10 days before the examination, and must schedule the time and place for the make-up exam with Dr.In the case of medical emergency, the student must submit documentation from a licensed medical care facility or provider as soon as possible after the exam is given.Make-up examinations will cover the same range of material and will be of comparable difficulty, but will be entirely essay in format.Boerner can approve make-up exams; do not take requests for make-up exams to your lab instructor.99 “Final” Exam The third of the three lecture exams will be given during Final Exam week.It is currently scheduled for final exam is on Wednesday, December 10 at 7:30 AM in our regular lecture room, PH 1184.If for any reason you cannot take the final exam as scheduled, you must submit a written request to Dr.Boerner to take this exam at a different time, and must justify this request with a reasonable academic argument.

Conflicts with airline reservations or vacation trips do not constitute reasonable academic arguments.All such requests must be submitted before the end of the seventh week of the quarter.Earning Final Grades The following grading scale will be used to determine the final grade you have earned: >93%=A 90-92%=A87-89%=B+ 83-86%=B 80-82%=B77-79%=C+ 73-76%=C 70-72%=C60-69%=D <59%=E FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQs): Will lecture attendance be used in the grading scheme? Frankly, I hope everyone will attend all lectures.Material will be covered in lecture that is not available either in the textbook or the manual, and that alone should be sufficient for you to attend lecture on a regular basis.However, lecture attendance will not be used explicitly in the grading process, and attendance will not be taken in lecture.

Do I really need to do the readings in the textbook? The goal of this course is to give each and every student a broad and comprehensive introduction to the discipline of ecology at all levels of ecological hierarchy and for all groups of organisms.We feel the combination of the textbook readings, the seminars you attend, and the lectures can achieve this.Most of the lecture time will be devoted to principles and concepts, with examples presented as time permits.Your assigned readings will supply a wealth of additional examples and explanations to complement what is presented in lecture.Your textbook will also cover topics that are central to the course but will not be presented in lecture due to time constraints.

For you to actually achieve the goals of this course, you will need to put in the time and effort to master the information and examples presented in both the lecture and the textbook.Neither is sufficient in the absence of the other, and both will be tested on the exams.100 Is there enough detail in the lecture outlines and other supplements on Carmen for me to pass the exams without attending lecture? The outlines and supplemental materials in the lecture manual are designed to make it easier for you to take comprehensive notes during lecture.They are not a substitute for careful attention and note-taking in lecture.

The questions on the three exams will often deal with examples and ideas presented in lecture but neither explicitly explained on the lecture outline nor presented in your textbook.

As a result you (as the student) must be a conscientious recorder.Be sure the information you write in your notes is legible, complete, and correct.Just five minutes spent after each lecture reviewing your notes of the day will improve information content tremendously.How many times have you thought to yourself "I know I understood this concept when it was presented in lecture; at the time, it seemed so simple and logical.Why don't my notes make sense night before the exam?" By writing a few more lines in the margins of your notes, expanding on this or that point, you can more easily interpret your notes at exam score higher on exams.

Are there specific learning objectives for the course listed anywhere? We have formatted the learning objectives of this course as “study questions”.You can find the learning objectives/study questions on Carmen.What do I do if I miss lecture? Please realize that lecture notes are indispensable at exam time.If you do miss because of illness, be sure to get notes from a classmate.Lecture notes will not be posted on Carmen or be available from the instructors.

To help guide you in your note taking, lecture outlines are provided on Carmen, and lists of study questions for each exam follow the outlines for the group of lectures covered on each exam.In addition, your textbook presents lists of major concepts at the beginning of each chapter.These are an excellent guide to what both the authors and your instructors want you to learn from each chapter.Is the final exam comprehensive? No! The exam given during exam week covers the last 1/3 of the course and is similar to the other two exams in length, depth, breadth, and structure.What are research seminars, and how do I find them? Research seminars are sessions of 35-50 minutes during which someone presents the results of research they have accomplished or are currently conducting.

Speakers may be graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, OSU faculty, or visiting scientists.Many departments and programs have weekly seminar series, and a partial listing of those that typically include ecological topics is posted for you on Carmen.Seminar schedules for the quarter and fliers advertising individual seminars are posted in buildings in which the various departments and programs are housed and on department and on college web sites.What if I can’t make any of the scheduled seminars because of work or personal conflicts? Attending seminars and writing comprehensive seminar summaries are essential components of the learning strategies being employed in this course.Given the diversity of days and times at which seminar programs are offered we do not feel it is unreasonable to expect students to find times in their schedules to attend them.

If a student’s combined course load and outside employment or other commitments make it impossible to meet course requirements, the student must find a way to reduce one or the other, or drop the course.Boerner will not offer alternatives to this portion of the course requirements.If this is a major problem for you, please be aware that not all of the offerings of EEOB 503.01 require seminar summaries; some require full research papers instead.

101 What should I do if I feel I need some accommodation to allow me to succeed in this course? Anyone who feels they may need an accommodation based on a special need should contact Dr.Boerner to arrange an appointment as soon as possible after the beginning of the quarter.At that time we can discuss the course format, anticipate your needs, and explore potential adaptations to meet your needs.We rely on the Office for Disability Services for assistance in verifying the need for accommodations and developing accommodation strategies.If you have not previously contacted the Office for Disability Services, please do so.

Note: The syllabus, lecture manual, and exams can be made available in alternative media, given advanced notice and documentation from ODS.What should I do it I’m having difficulty with the amount and/or type of writing that’s required in this course? We recommend you make use of the OSU Writing Center.The OSU Writing Center is a place where students, faculty, staff, and alumni can receive free, individual consultations on any piece of writing.The Writing Center can help with traditional writing assignments like research reports and essays, but you can also work on lab reports, personal statements, resumes, job letters, and even screenplays.Graduate Associates from a variety of disciplines staff OSU’s Writing Center.

The Writing Center works on an appointment basis.Appointments last approximately 50 minutes and start on the half hour (e.Call 688-4291 or stop by room 485 Mendenhall Lab to schedule an appointment.What is the course policy on Academic Misconduct? You are responsible for completing your academic assignments on your own; there are no assignments, exams, or seminar summary requirements in EEOB 503.01 that can or should be completed as a group exercise.Examples of plagiarism and other forms of academic misconduct are given in the code of student conduct, and it is the responsibility of all OSU students to understand what actions might be construed as academic misconduct.Any and all suspected incidents of academic misconduct in EEOB 503.

02 will be forward to the OSU Committee on Academic Misconduct for adjudication.What is the course policy concerning diversity? The instructors of this course are committed to promoting a welcoming climate for all students.

For more information on diversity, see the EEOB ( /~eeob/diversity/) or OSU ( /diversity/) websites.

The instructors welcome suggestions, questions, and comments.Any exchange of ideas will be conducted with confidentiality, safety, and respect as guiding principles.102 ANTICIPATED SCHEDULE OF LECTURES AND ACTIVITIES DATE ACTIVITY Thurs, 9/25 9/25-9/26 Lecture Recitation Tues, 9/30 Thurs, 10/2 9/30-10/3 Tues, 10/7 Thurs, 10/9 10/7-10/10 Tues, 10/14 Thurs, 10/16 10/14-10/17 Tues, 10/21 Thurs, 10/23 10/21-10/24 Lecture Lecture Recitation Lecture Lecture Recitation Lecture Tues, 10/28 Thurs, 10/30 10/28-10/31 Tues, 11/4 Thurs, 11/6 11/4-11/7 Tues, 11/11 Thurs, 11/13 11/11-11/14 Tues, 11/18 Thurs, 11/20 11/18-11/21 Tues, 11/25 Thurs, 11/27 11/25-11/28 Lecture Tues, 12/2 Lecture Thurs 12/4 12/2-12/5 Lecture Recitation Recitation Lecture Lecture Recitation Lecture Recitation Lecture Lecture Recitation No class Recitation Lecture Lecture Recitation Lecture No class Recitation TOPIC Why and How to do Ecology No recitations during week 1 Physiological & Behavioral Ecology: Water Physiological & Behavioral Ecology: Heat Seminars: schedules, summaries, etc.Physiological & Behavioral Ecology: Light Evolutionary Aspects of Ecology Anatomy of a Scientific Paper Social Behavior First Exam (lectures and readings of 9/25-10/9) Review for Exam I Ecology of Populations I TEXT READING Ch.10 Ecology of Populations II Population Growth Exercises Competition (First Seminar Summary Due) Ch.12 Predation, Parasitism, and Mutualism Lotka-Volterra Exercises Community Structure and Diversity Why and How Communities Change Review for Exam II Veterans’ Day Second Exam (lectures and readings of 10/14-11/4) Introduction to Statistical Analysis Primary Production and Energy Flow Element Cycling and Retention I (Second Seminar Summary Due) Ecosystem Services Exercise Element Cycling and Retention II Ch.

15 Thanksgiving Holiday No recitations this week Landscape Ecology (Third Seminar Summary Due) Climate Drivers and Ecosystem Geography Review for Exam III, Student Evaluations Ch.3 103 Wed 12/10, 7:30 AM Third Exam (lectures and readings of 11/6-12/4) COURSE SYLLABUS EEOB 503.02: LABORATORY IN ECOLOGY AUTUMN 2008 Course Coordinator: Dr.Ludsin 232 Aquatic Ecology Laboratory telephone: 292-6208 e-mail: email protected LABORATORY SECTION MEETING TIMES: Wednesday 8:30-12:18 Wednesday 12:30-4:18 Thursday 11:30-3:18 Friday, 8:30-12:18 All laboratory sections meet in 130 Jennings Hall (corner of 12th and Neil), room 130 REQUIRED TEXTS: Boerner, R.

Important Note: Used copies of the lab manual are not acceptable as they will be missing the report sheets and will not contain all of the exercises present in this edition of the manual.How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper, 6th Edition.

(Available at the OSU Bookstore and associated stores) LEARNING OBJECTIVES: The student who successfully completes this course should be able to Understand some of the basic experimental designs and procedures used in ecological studies; Understand basic statistical procedures, know when various statistical tests are appropriate, and know how to interpret the results of basic inferential tests; Develop life tables from field data and interpret them in terms of population trajectory; Operate computer simulation models of landscape structure, and logistic population growth, and interpret their results in terms of real-world applications; Use the logistic growth model to solve applied problems; Write a research report in the form used by scientists in academia, public service, and private industry; 104 Do effective peer reviews of drafts of scientific papers and make use of peer reviews in improving one’s own drafts.Work more effectively in research teams and understand better the dynamics that both improve and hinder group research.105 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Course Structure: EEOB 503.02 has a single, four hour laboratory meeting per week.

Reading assignments for the laboratories are all from the laboratory manual and the required text.The laboratory experiences are designed to complement and extend the material covered in the lecture course EEOB 503.01, and will include simple experiments, demonstrations, problems, and writing of scientific papers.Most exercises will require further data analysis, and written submissions ranging from brief summaries to full scientific papers will need to be prepared outside of class.Most of the laboratory experiences contained in this manual follow a consistent format: 1) A background segment that provides the ecological theory and relevant information you will need to place that laboratory experience into the larger, ecological context; 2) A general methods section that provides the “big picture” of what we hope to achieve during that lab exercise; 3) A set of detailed, step-by-step instructions of what you are to do during the lab.

The laboratory grade will be calculated on the basis of the following criteria: 1) weekly lab write-ups, 2) a scientific paper based on one of your experiments, and 3) participation.1) Weekly Lab Write-ups: Most labs will include a written assignment summarizing the lab exercise in a form that represents the Results and Discussion sections of a traditional scientific paper.Your Lab Instructor will tell you more about each assignment as it approaches.2) Scientific Paper: You will write a full scientific report covering the Competition Experiment.To help you learn the basics of technical writing, you will submit first drafts of the various parts of the first report for peer-review and you will also do peer-reviews of a classmate’s draft.

3) Participation: If you wish to understand the relationships between organisms and their environment, it is essential that you attend class and participate fully in all experiments and discussions.Your peer review of a classmates’ scientific paper draft will also be important in both your learning and that of your classmates.Your Lab Instructor will assess your participation on an on-going basis, and meet with you to discuss it if he/she feels you are not participating up to expectations.Anyone missing three laboratory periods for reasons other than those deemed appropriate by University rules will be assigned a grade of E for the course regardless of points accumulated.Late assignments: Assignments are due at the beginning of the class period on the date indicated on the course schedule, and assignments turned in after the class will be considered 106 late.

Assignments submitted late will have 10% of the maximum possible points deducted per day late.For example, a student who turns in a 50-point assignment two days late will be able to earn a maximum of 40 points.If you think you will have trouble turning in an assignment on time, discuss the situation with your Lab Instructor as soon as you can.Sharing lab report data: Often laboratory exercises involve group participation while conducting experiments and collecting data.During this part of the process we encourage active participation and discussion among students; however, unless otherwise specified by your instructor, preparing (i.

) laboratory reports must be an individual exercise.This practice is designed to ensure that each student takes an active role in analyzing data, graphing results, and interpreting his/her results in writing.Your Lab Instructor will not accept laboratory reports that have been prepared as a group effort unless you have been given specific directions to do so for that specific report.

If you have any questions, feel free to call or email your Lab Instructor.Better yet, drop by his/her office and he/she will work to answer any and all of your questions.The Lab Instructors will work to make the laboratory portion of the course a good learning experience, as well as an enjoyable one.Calculating the final course grade: The following scale will be used to determine the final overall course grade you earned: Points Percentage Grade 468-500 93.0 Grade C+ C CD+ D E Accommodation: Anyone who feels he/she may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability or other special need should contact his/her Lab Instructor to arrange an appointment as soon as possible.At the appointment we can discuss the course format, anticipate your needs, and explore potential adaptations to meet your needs.

We rely on the Office for Disability Services for assistance in verifying the need for accommodations and developing accommodation strategies.If you have not previously contacted the Office for Disability Services, we encourage you to do so.Academic Misconduct: OSU has a strict code of academic misconduct that requires us to report any and all cases of suspected misconduct (e.cheating on an exam, plagiarism in written assignments, using an exam proxy, etc.

) to the OSU Committee on Academic Misconduct for adjudication.For more information, go to /coam/ Sexual Harassment: OSU and EEOB consider harassment on the basis of gender or sexual orientation to be unacceptable behavior that destroys opportunities for learning.While all members of the 107 staff involved in this course have been trained in the OSU sexual harassment policies and procedures, this is not true for all OSU students.Please report any concerns about questionable or unwanted behavior to Dr.

For more information, go to /cst/ Alternate Materials: This manual can be converted to alternate materials for those who require.Please notify us if you require this service and give us sufficient time to prepare them.108 LABORATORY INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION Instructor’s Name: Office Phone: Office Address: Mailbox: Office Hours: E-Mail: COURSE ASSESSMENT Assignment Literature Search Exercise Vegetation Analysis Report Corridors and Stepping Stones Report Human Demography Report Fire and Ohio Landscape Report Competition Interim Assignment Competition Report: Introduction & Methods Draft Competition Report: Results & Discussion Draft Final Competition Scientific Paper Lab and Group Participation Total Points Available 1 2 15 points for your draft, 15 points for peer-reviews assigned by the lab instructor 109 Format Individual Group Group Group Group Individual Points 30 100 50 50 50 25 Individual Individual Individual Individual 301 301 100 352 500 LABORATORY SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIGNMENTS Lab Week Dates Activities and Assignments Due Required Reading Week 1 W 9/24 - F 9/26 Course Orientation; Anatomy of A Scientific Paper, Part I; How to Read A Scientific Paper; Course Syllabus; LM, pp.3-10, 56-65 Week 2 W 10/1 - F 10/3 Begin Competition Experiment; Anatomy of a Scientific Paper, Part II; Literature Search Exercise LM, pp.66-98, 185-205 Week 3 W 10/8 - F 10/10 Vegetation Analysis Experiment; (Field Trip to West Campus Woods); Due: Literature Search Exercise LM, pp.10-36 Week 4 W 10/15 - F 10/17 Statistical Analysis of Ecological Data; Introduction to Excel; Due: Nothing (but don't get used to it) LM, pp.37-45 Week 5 W 10/22 - F 10/24 Corridors, Stepping Stones, & Butterflies; Due: Vegetation Analysis Report LM, pp.

55-60 Week 6 W 10/29 - F 10/31 Human Demography; (Field Trip: Green Lawn Cemetery); Due: Corridors Report LM, pp.46-54 Week 7 W 11/5 - F 11/7 Fire and the Ohio Landscape; Due: Demography Exercise LM,pp.61-71 Week 8 W 11/12 - F 11/14 Competition Experiment Harvest; Due: Ohio Landscape Report; Due: Competition Pre-Harvest Exercise LM, pp.72-79 Week 9 W 11/19 - F 11/21 Statistical Analysis of Competition Experiment Data; Peer Reviews, Part I; Due: Draft of Introduction and Methods sections of competition report D, pp.80 Week 10 W 12/3 - F 12/5 In-class Peer Reviews, Part II; Due: Draft of Results and Discussion sections of the competition report T 12/9, noon Due: Final Competition Report Exam Week *LM denotes readings from the EEOB 503.02 Lab Manual and DY denotes reading from Day (1998) How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper.: 110 EEOB 505: Marine Biology (5 credits) T, H 2:30-4:18 Jennings 60 Instructor Meg Daly email protected 614-247-8412 10-11:30 Abby Reft email protected 614-688-3974 by appt Aronoff 118 TA Course Objectives To understand the physical, ecological, and evolutionary processes that shape organismal diversity in the world’s oceans.Administrative policies and grading Mastery of the course objectives will be assessed through tests, homework, and lab exercises.The date of each of the 2 tests is indicated on the schedule.

Each test will be worth 110 points, and will include short essay questions and/or interpretative problems.There will be 5 homework assignments, worth a total of 100 points, and 2 labs with write-ups worth 40 points apiece.The planned schedule for these is on the syllabus.If we get behind in lecture, the deadlines will be adjusted accordingly.There will be NO extra credit, but should you earn less than a C- (68%) on the first test, you can request additional problems or work to make up the difference between your grade and a 68% (C-).

You will have one week to do the additional assignments.Final grades will be adjusted if necessary to achieve an average grade of a C (75%).Lecture notes will be provided through Carmen, usually the day before class.These are intended to make it easier for you to stay organized and to be focused on what happens in class, and as such are guides, rather than contracts.We will diverge from them in places, and embellish on them in others.

Although the tests will focus on what happens in class, I expect that you will do the readings assigned with each lecture.This class will cover an enormous amount of material.Some points well described in your book will not be described in as 111 much detail in class, and some class discussions will take as a given a working familiarity with the text book.Although you will not receive a grade for attendance per se, it is in your best interest to attend class regularly.

There will be frequent in-class demonstrations and activities.Most critically, you will learn more if you attend class than if you do not.Documentation is required for absences that require re-scheduling of tests, missing labs, or extending homework deadlines.Any student who feels s/he may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact me privately to discuss specific needs.I am happy to work with the Office for Disability Services (614-292-3307, room 150 Pomerene Hall) to coordinate reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities.

Textbook Marine Biology: An ecological approach (6th edition) JW Nybakken & MD Bertness Schedule of lectures Date Topic Readings 20 Basic Principles of Ch 1: 1-19, 31-35 Sept 25 Oceanography Currents and Tides Ch 6: 267-72 Sept 27 The Rocky Intertidal; Ch 6: 272-77, 308-325 Sept 02 Oct 04 Oct 09 Oct 11 Oct 16 Oct Introduction The Rocky Intertidal: Zonation Rocky Intertidal: Lab Marine Food chain Plankton Reef Structure 18 Oct Coral Reefs: Symbiosis Assignmen ts Ch 6: 277-306 HW 2 due Ch 2: 61-95 Ch 2: 42-61 Ch 1: 25-31 Ch 9: 407-423 Ch 9: 424-428 Ch 10: 476-483, 485496 112 HW 1 due HW 3 due 23 Oct 25 Oct Coral Reefs: Biological Factors Guest lecture: Astrid Frisch- Ch 9: 428-452 Lab 1 due Jordan Conservation tourism and Sea 30 Oct 1 Nov turtles Test 1 Estuaries Ch 8: 361-374 Ch 8: 381-400 Ch 7: 342-357 6 Nov Lab 2: osmoregulation 8 Nov The Open Ocean 13 Nov The open ocean HW 4 due Ch 3: 103-132 Ch 3: 132-141 Ch 4: 187-191 15 Nov Whales; Deep sea benthos Ch 4: 166-174 20 Nov Deep sea hydrothermal vents Ch 4: 174-175 22 Nov No Class: Thanksgiving Holiday 27 Nov Fisheries Ch 11: 500-520 29 Nov Human Impacts on the Ocean Ch 1: 520-534 06 Dec Final Exam • Note: The final exam is on the last day sch Lab 2 due HW 5 due The Ohio State University 1-week course offering at Stone Laboratory Summer 2009 June 28 – July 4 .Quarter Credit Hours – 3 under/grad Local Flora for Teachers is a hands-on course for educators providing basic botanical and identification skills, field experience, and preparation of lessons for use back in the classroom.Special attention will be paid to the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) Academic Content Science Standards.The course will help prepare teachers to present material on a number of these science standards including identification, habitats, and adaptations of Ohio plants.

Project Learning Tree (PLT), an educational program for teachers of students K-8 sponsored by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry, will be offered as an option during evening sessions ($22 fee for workshop activity guide.) Supplemental PLT units for grades 9-12 can be offered as well.113 Student Learning Outcomes-Course Objectives 1.Learn basic plant anatomy and botanical terms.Practice the use of simple dichotomous keys.Become familiar with the characteristics of at least ten common plant families and learn to sight identify a number of common plants, trees, shrubs, ferns, and vines from Ohio.Learn how to dry and mount plant specimens for display or use back in the classroom.

Use a field journal to record information about plants habitat and identification.Prepare grade specific lessons following ODE Academic Content Standards that are applicable.Take daily field trips to reinforce classroom knowledge.

Will learn the use of hand lenses and dissecting microscopes.Learn about different plant habitats found in Ohio and adaptations plants have made to those environments.Will discuss importance of diversity and plant conservation efforts.

Learn about invasive nonnative plant species and the changes they have made here in Ohio.Learn the values, uses, and interactions of plants with people and animals including uses of plants as food, medicine, and more.Tentative Daily Schedule of Course Sunday- Introduction to Flora of the Lake Erie Islands, Class Requirements Monday-Plant Basics, Common Plant Families, Keys, Pollination Strategies-Field Trip to Butterfly House, South Bass Island Tuesday-Habitats Here in Ohio and Why-Environmental Conditions, Succession Field Trip to Kelleys Island-Succession-From Bare Rock to Woods Wednesday- Invasive Species Here in Ohio, Diversity and Conservation of Plants Field Trip- Resthaven Prairie, Edison Woods, Erie Sand Barrens Thursday- Plant and Animal Interactions, Adaptations, Field Trip to Cleveland Botanical Gardens Glass Houses Friday-Presentation of Class Room Lesson Projects, Field Trip to Pelee Island, Ontario (passport needed), alternative field trip Oak Openings Saturday-Final Exam Evening Sessions may include edible plants, pressing plants, Project Learning Tree, guest lectures.

of Agriculture, Wildlife Research Station 419-285-5811 (home), email protected Course Syllabus THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY ~ SENR 114 COURSE SYllABUS INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Environment and Natural Resources 201 Spring 2008 5 credit hours (UG) Lecture: Days and times M & W8:3010:18am Recitations: Location He Call number 14988-A Days and times Location Call number Wednesdays 2:00- UH 0151 14991-5 2:48pm Thursdays 11 :00- PK 0257 14990-0 11:48am Fridays 9:009:48am Instructor: Dr.

Stacey Fineran 469C Kottman Hall Office Hours: By appointment nn~.!J, Textbook DB 0048 14989-1 Page 1 of2 Botkin Daniel B.Environmental Science: Earth as a Living Planet, 6th ed.(ISBN 9780470049907) Course Management It is the responsibility of the student to check for syllabus updates, announcements, and homework & quiz materials and information as they are made available throughout the course.

Grading Homework (6 @ 20 pts each; drop 1) Quizzes (3 @ 25 pts each) 2 midterm exams (100 points each) Final exam 100 points 75 points 200 points 100 points rrent!courses/SP08/em20 1 sy l.html 4/25/2008 Course Syllabus Attendance & Participation Total Grades: 25 points 115 500 points Page 2 of2 The total number of points earned divided by 500 points possible multiplied by 100 is your grade in percentage.The following shows the grade in percentage in relation to the letter grade you will receive.Percentage Letter Percentage Letter Grade Grade 93 -100+ A 77-79 C+ 90-92 A- 73-76 C 87 -89 B+ 70-72 C83-86 B 67-69 0+ 80-82 B- 60-66 0 59 or E below Academic Misconduct Statement Academic misconduct (plagiarism, cheating, and other forms of misconduct as defined by the university) will not be tolerated in this course.

According to Faculty Rule 3335-31-02 Academic Misconduct is defined as any activity which tends to compromise the academic integrity of the institution or subvert the educational process.Please see the Student Resource Guide or the instructors if you have questions about this policy.Disability Statement Any student who feels s/he may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact me privately to discuss your specific needs.Please contact the Office for Disability Services at 614-292-3307 in room 150 Pomerene Hall to coordinate reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities.$ rrent/courses/SP08/enr20 1 4/25/2008 Course Syllabus ~ THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY .

,AQ: SENR CO JRSE SCHEDULE INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Environment and Natural Resources 201 Spring 2008 5 credit hours (UG) Lecture: Days and times M & W8:3010:18am Recitations: Location He Call number 14988-A Days and times Location Call number Wednesdays 2:00- UH 0151 14991-5 2:48pm Thursdays 11 :00- PK 0257 14990-0 11:48am 116 Fridays 9:009:48am DB 0048 14989-1 Instructor: Dr.Stacey Fineran 469C Kottman Hall Office Hours: By appointment fi, J,e;,m,n.Q,W Spring 2008 Schedule Date Topic Mar 24 Critical Thinking about the Environment; The Big Picture: Systems of Change Mar26 The Human Population and the Environment Mar 31 The Biogeochemical Cycles; Energy Basics Apr2 The Atmosphere and Climate Apr? The Atmosphere and Climate: Biomes Apr 9 The Atmosphere and Climate: Global Warming Apr14 Exam 1 Apr 16 Ecological Hierarchies, Ecosystems, & Energy rrent/courses/SP08/ Page 1 of2 Textbook Reading Chapters 1, 2, 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 23 Chapter 8 Chapter 23 Chapter 3 4/2512008 Course Syllabus Apr 21 Apr 23 Apr.

28 Apr 30 May 5 May 7 May 12 May 14 May 19 May21 May 26 May 28 June 2 JQ .,G,QJ)r$,~",p'~,g? Landscape alteration Population Ecology Population Ecology Community Ecology Exam 2 Soils & SoH Degradation The hydrosphere: Freshwater systems: surface water Ecologica! Restoration The Hydrosphere: Freshwater Systems: Surface Water & Groundwater Marine Environment; Water Supply, Use, and Management Memorial Day: No classes Natural Disasters and Catastrophes; Urban Environments & the Future Final Exam: Monday, June 2nd, 7:30 am - 9:18 am ,edul current! courses/SP08/ enr20 1 Chapter 13 Chapter 4, 7 Chapter 4,7 Chapter 7, 10 117 Chapter 12 Chapter 21, 22 Chapter 10 Chapter 21, 22 Chapter 21, 22 Chapter 16 Chapter 29 Page 2 of2 4/25/2008 Course Syllabus ~ THEQHIQ'STATE uNIVERSITY ,All GENR SOCIETY AND NATURAL RESOURCES Environment and Natural Resources 203 Spring Quarter 2008 5 credit hrs INSTRUCTOR: Dr.

John Heywood 469B Kottman Hall Contact Information Email - h~Ywo9d, email protected §u,~du Phone - 614/292-7315 Fax - 614/292-3523 TAs Melitta Smith Jim Downs Kottman Hall COURSE SVUABUS 454 Kottman Hall Contact information Email - $mJt.Contact information Email-(; email protected $.y Page 10f3 This course introduces students to concepts and theories in the social sciences that help the student understand how hUman societies interact with ecosystems and natural resources.This course emphasizes the human dimensions of ecosystems and natural resources primarily from a sociological perspective.Text - NR 203 course readings from OSU Library Electronic Reserve Course objectives Students will be challenged to critically consider different value systems, competing interpretations of the relationship between humans and nature, and the varying ways that social power is organized to influence and/or determine the status of natural resources.Students will describe structural, functional models of human society and how culture, institutions, community-social order, and the polity effect ecosystem and natural resource values.

Students will describe process models of human society and how social dilemmas, economic processes, and polltical processes effect ecosystems and natural resources.

Students will describe the social construction model of human society and how symbolic meanings and differentia! power effect ecosystems and natural resources.118 Course Requirements Exam I = 100 pts.Exam III = 100 pts, Recitations = 200 pts.each) Total = 500 pts, Grades are based on total points earned by each student.Grading is based on a modified curve with the highest pOints for the class serving as the maximum pOints possible.A's are usually 90% and better of the maximum pOints scored, B's 80% to 89%, C's 70% to 79%, D's 60% to 69%, and E 59% or lower than the maximum points scored.Grading ranges may vary slightly depending on the distribution of scores for the class.rrenticourses/SP08/ 4/25/2008 Course Syllabus Assignments - Recitation assignments are due at the weekly recitations.

Attendance - Attendance at lectures and participation in recitations are required for a passing grade.Selected readings source list: Structural/functional human ecosystem models Page 2 of3 Axelrod, LJ.

Balancing personal needs with environmental preservation: Identifying the values that guide decisions in ecological dilemmas.Public Lands Politics: Interest Group Influence on the Forest Service and the Bureau ofLand Management Baltimore, MD: Resources for the Future, Inc.The human ecosystem, Part II: Social indicators in ecosystem management.Society & Natural Resources, 10, 369-382.Social order in outdoor leisure settings.Culture, Conflict, and Communication in the Wildland-urban Interface Boulder, CO: Westview Press, pp.

Conventions, emerging norms and norms in outdoor recreation.

This sovereign land: A new vision for governing the west Washington, DC: Island Press.

Environmental Values in American Culture Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.Privatizing Public Lands New York: Oxford University Press.Problem Analysis: The Social Dimension of Ecosystem Management S1.The human ecosystem, Part I: The human ecosystem as an organizing concept in ecosystem management.

Society & Natural Resources 10, 347-368.Radical Ecology: The Search for a Livable World New York: Routledge.Property, Power, and Public Choice: An Inquiry into Law and Economics New York: Praeger Publishers.The value basis of environmental concern.Value orientations, gender, and environmental concern.Socially cooperative choices: An approach to achieving resource sustainability in the coastal zone.Social Dilemmas Boulder, CO: Westview Press.Governing the Commons: The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

119 Social construction paradigm rrenticourses/SP08/ 4/25/2008 Course Syllabus Page 3 of3 Albrecht, S.Myth-making, moral communities, and policy failure in solving the radioactive waste problem.Society & Natural Resources 12, 741-761.Symbolic Interactionism: An Introduction, an Interpretation, an Integration 4th Edition.In a Dark Wood New York: HougtonMifflin Co.The role of communication and symbolism in interest group competition: the case of the Siskiyou National Forest, 1983-1992.

Going Wild: Hunting, Animal Rights and the Contested Meaning of Nature Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press.Landscapes: The social construction of nature and the environment.Restoring nature: Perspectives from the socia! sciences and humanities.Environmental Sociology: A Social Contructionist Perspective New York: Routledge.Prospects Heights, IL: Waveland Press, Inc.Bring back the elephants! Wild Earth 9,57-64.Current Perspectives in Social Theory 2, 133-151.Nourishing Terrains: Australian Aboriginal Views of Landscape and Wilderness Canberra, ACT: Australian Herltage Commission.The wolf in Yellowstone: Science, symbol, or politics? Oeconstructing the conflict between environmentalism and wise use.Society & Natural Resources 10, 453-468.This material is also available in alternative formats upon request.Don Eckert, School of Natural Resources, 210 Kottman Hall, 2021 Coffey Rd.

!$,t(ng rrent/courses/SP08/ 4/25/2008 Course Schedule OHIO SWE THE OHIO $TATE I,INIVI!R$ITY AItt SENR Society and Natural Resources Environment and Natural Resources 203 Spring Quarter 2008 5 credit hrs INSTRUCTOR: Dr.John Heywood 469B Kottman Hall Contact Information Email - email protected §.u Phone - 614/292-7315 Fax - 614/292-3523 •.

eQu TAs Melitta Smith Jim Downs Kottman Hall Contact information 454 Kottman Hall Contact information Email- email protected Email- Q.'y, Week 1 120 Week 2 Dale Topic 3/24 Introduction - web based course materials Introduction to case studies Lectures 'ntroduction- What is human society and how do human societies interact with ecosystems and natural resources? Paradigms - Structural, functional Process Socia! construction 3/25 Structural/functional Human-Ecosystem Models Social worlds & the natural world Economy (Adaptation) Community (social Integration) Culture (Pattern maintenace), Polity (Goal attainment) 3/26 Human Ecosystem Critical Resources Human Socia! System 3/27 Video - Bill Moyers, "The Politics of Trees" 3/28 Recitation -1 Background - Pacific Northwest old growth forests 3/31 Lectures Community - Social order Social conventions, social norms 4/1 Weak norms - multiple-use bike trails in Columbus, home energy conservation A strong norm - skiing with dogs in Norway A very strong norm - not littering in Columbus parks 4/2 Community - Justice, law, and the judicial role senr, current! courses/SP081 enr203 Page 1 of4 Reading Lewis (1994) pp.355-359 4/25/2008 Course Schedule Page 2 of 4 Week 3 Week 4 WeekS 4/3 Social cycles 4/4 Recitation - 2 PNW communities 4/7 4/8 4/9 Lectures Culture, Values Environmental Value orientations Terminal, Instrumental - Personal, Social, Biocentric, Religious/spiritual Ozone transport problem Dominant Social Paradigm New Environmental Paradigm Natural Resource Philosophies and Values Utilitarianism - Personal Progressive conservation - Social Romantic preservation - Religious/Spiritual Environmentalism - Biocentric Optimistic Environmentalism - Sustainable Development, Ecological Modernization, Green Rationalism Pessimistic Environmentalism - Survivalism, Green Romanticism, Radicalism, Terrorism 4/10 Modern Utilitarianism - Economic Rationalism, Prometheans, Radicalism, Terrorism Environmental Problem Solving - Administrative Rationalism, Democratic Pragmaticism 121 Environmental Apocalypse, Christian Environmentalism 4/11 Recitation 3 The players in the old growth controversy 4/14 EXAM 1- CARMEN (12:01 am to 11:59 pm March 14) Lectures Economy Monetary and Social Welfare values Markets & Commodities - $ values (tangibles) Allocation, extraction, commodity, market.

exchange 4/15 Goods - public, private Non-commodities (public goods) - no $ values (intangibles) Valuation - existence, equity, subsidy 4/16 Public policy - Monetary values & Non-monetary values Contingent valuation Pareto optimality Compensation 4/17 Polity - Sources of power & power relationships in the U.Federalism, Check & Balances Leadership, Authority, Regulation 4/18 Recitation 4 The economy of the Pacific Northwest 4/21 lectures Sovereignty, jurisdiction Public powers - federal, state 4/22 Public powers - property, commerce, treaty, supremacy, State's Rights 4/23 Economy Property rights 4/24 Public powers, takings, regulatory takings ,eduicurrent/courses/SP08/ Lewis (1994) pp.115-117 4/25/2008 Course Schedule Page 3 of 4 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 4/25 Recitation 5 The Polity of the Pacific Northwest 4/28 Lecture Process Paradigms ~ Social Dilemmas Tragedy of the Commons What is a commons? Property regimes Private, State, Common, Open AccessWhat is the tragedy? 4/29 Video - Steve Cowan, "Empty Oceans, Empty Nets" 4/30 Social dilemmas 5/1 The games people play , Self interests, Collective interests, Interdependence Social dilemmas with many people - N-Person games Socia! dilemmas faced many times - iterated play 5/2 Recitation 6 Background - New England fisheries 5/5 Social dilemmas Social traps - pools and sumps 5/6 Social fences, free rIding, collective & public goods 5/7 Solving social dilemmas Structural solutions Privatize, State regulation 5/8 Behavioral solutions 122 Collective cooperation, outbreaks of cooperation 5/9 EXA!IL!! - CARMEN (12:01 am to 11 :59 pm May 9) Recitation ~ 7 Social dilemmas - Georges Bank groundfishing 5/12 Lectures Social Constructions of nature Symbolic Interactionism - reality, social objects, symbols 5/13 Symbolic Interactionism - action, the self, roJes, role taking 5/14 Videos - Rosen & Howard, "Wolf, An Ancient Spirit Returns, ~ National Geographic, "Return of the Wolf' 5/15 Symbolic Interactionism - action, the self, roles, role taking 5/16 Recitation 8 Background - Wolf reintroduction to Yellowstone 5/19 How is reality socially constructed? Sociology of Everyday Life 5/20 Social Constructions of nature Group claim making 5/21 Restoration Ecology - wolves, Cook Co., IL savannas 5/22 Restoration Ecology - mammothslmastodons senr,osu,edu/current/courses/SP08/enr203sch,html Komorita & Parks (1996) pp.453-459 4/25/2008 Course Schedule 5123 Recitation 9 The wolf and differential social power Week 10 5126 MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY 5127 Radioaclive wasle disposal- Ward Valley, CA 5128 Radioaclive wasle disposal - Skull Valley, UT 5/29 Human Dimensions of Natural Resources 5130 Recitation -10 The Wolf, Endangered Species Acl, and delisling EXAM 111- CARMEN (12:01 am to 11:59 pm May 30) t9.i:?J=t pglg~ to SP08 course HstLng rrenticourses/SP08/ Page 4 of4 M.863-870 4/25/2008 Course Syllabus OHIO SlJlITE THE QHIOSTATE UNIVERSITY SOIL SCIENCE LECTURE ENR 300.

Q1 Winter 2008 3 Credits Course Instructor Brian K.Slater 123 ~ SENR Associate Professor, Soil Science 414D Kottman Hall Telephone: 292-5891 email protected Office hours: 3:00 to 4:00 PM MW or by appointment Teaching Assistants Joe Ringler 231 Kottman Hall jqJ~rJngl,§ email protected §.Textbook: Rebecca Tirado Corbala 231 Kottman Hall ,g,Q.M Soils: An Introduction (6th Edition, 2006) by Michael J.MUnns Pearson Prentice Hall ISBN: 0131190199 Course Objectives: Page 1 of3 The overall objective of this introductory course is to introduce the basic concepts and vocabulary of soil science.During the course we will examine the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils and their interactions with other components of forest, wetland, agricultural and grassland ecosystems.

Information about soil properties and behavior will help shape decisions regarding appropriate use and management of the valuable soil resource.understand how soils are formed and classified, 2.learn about important soil processes and their influence on soil behavior, 3.examine the role of soils in a variety of terrestrial ecosystems, and 4.

develop an appreciation for the world soil resource base and the importance of its conservation.Prerequisites Understanding soils requires a working knowledge of the principles and vocabulary of the sciences, including elementary chemistry.Students attempting to take this course without having received credit for Chemistry 101 or 121.(or an equivalent course) should be aware that the level of understanding is assumed, and little time will be available to review basic concepts of chemistry.Course Content: The lectures and reading assignments are intended to complement each other.

Most lectures will be directly related to assigned readings.The objective of the lectures will be to clarify important concepts and provide some supplemental material.Students are responsible for subject matter covered in lecture, the textbook, and any handouts.Handout pages of all lectures are posted on the School of Environment and Natural Resources website, bJtpJ $.Grading Grades will be based on: 2 Midterm exams @ 30% each: 60% /currentlcourses/WI08/enr300 01 sy l.html 4/25/2008 Course Syllabus Final exam Attendance 30% 10% Page 2 of3 Grades will be calculated on a scale of 0 - 100% of possible points.Letter grades will be assigned using a statistical cUlVe.

Attendance will be taken on 3 to 5 randomly selected dates throughout the quarter.

Exams: Midterm exams will be held on Monday January 2.The midterms and final will be in-class, closed book exams.The first mid-term will cover all material presented through January 19; the second mid-term will cover material presented from January 22 through 124 February 16.

The final will be comprehensive, covering all material presented during the quarter.The exams may be any combination of multiple choice, matching, true/false, short answer, and problem solving questions (bring.If an exam is missed due to medical problems, family tragedies, or university sponsored activlties, a written excuse from your physician or academic advisor must be provided.Otherwise, a zero will be assigned for that exam.

There wHl be no make-up exams or extra-credit assignments.Incompletes wi!! not be given unless pre-arranged with the instructor.Access and Accommodations: If you have concerns based on the impact of a disability, you should contact the instructor as soon as possible to arrange an appointment for discussing the course format, your needs, and accommodations.We rely on the Office for Disability Services for assistance in verifying the need for accommodations and developing strategies.If you have not previously contacted the Office for Disability Services, we encourage you to do so.

Tentative Outline and Schedule Week 1 (January 4) 2 (January 7-11) 3 (January 14-18) Wednesday, January 23 4 (January 2.5) 5 (January 28 - February 1) 6 (February 4-8) 7 (February 11-15) Monday, February 18 8 (February 2.Academic misconduct is defined as any activity that tends to compromise the academic integrity of the institution, or subvert the educational process.Examples of academic misconduct include, but are not limited to: violation of course rules as contained in the course syllabus or other information provided the student; violation of program regulations as established by departmental committees; providing or receiving information during quizzes and examinations such as course examinations and general examinations; or providing or using unauthorized assistance in the laboratory, at the computer terminal, or on field work; submitting plagiarized work for an academic requirement.Plagiarism is the representation of another's works or ideas as one's own; it includes the 125 unacknowledged word for word use and/or paraphrasing of another person's work, and/or the inappropriate, unacknowledged use of another person's ideas; falsification, fabrication, or dishonesty in reporting research results; serving as, or enlisting the assistance of, a Uringer" or substitute for a student in the taking of examinations; alteration of grades or marks by the student in an effort to change the earned grade or credit; and alteration of University forms used to drop or add courses to a program, or unauthorized use of those forms.eduicurrenticoursesIWI08/enr300 0 1 syLhtml 4/25/2008 Course Syllabus Page 3 of3 rrenticourses/WI08/enr300 0 1 sy l.html 4/2512008 Course Syllabus OHIO SJI\IE THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY COURSE Foundations of Environmental Communications.

Education and Interpretation NR 311 Autumn 2005 Course Instructor Joe.Room: 210 Kottman Hall Phone: 292-2265 e~mail: email protected Office hours: by apPointment Course Description Page 1 of 2 In this course students will learn basic theoretical education concepts that underpin environmental education, and the communication and interpretation skills necessary to relate these concepts to others.During the quarter students will be expected to demonstrate understanding and application of these theoretical concepts through projects, activities.Course Goals To gain an understanding of underpinning theories in the areas of: communication, interpretation and, (environmental) education.To develop skills in applying the above theoretical concepts.

Performance Objectives To actively participate in the learning process To share information with fellow students and the instructor To have new experiences (field trips) and be able to understand what is gained in the context of this course.Cable (1998) Interpretation for the 21st century Champaign, Il: Sagamore Publishing.

NAAEE (1996) Environmental Education Materials: Guidelines for Excellence.

(online at Y1JjCJ:Llli8L""ELW Attendance and Participation Attendance is required and expected.If you are not present and actively partiCipating.it is impossible to earn participation paints.your absence denies class members and instructors the opportunity to learn from you and you from them.If you need to miss a class please inform your instructor in advance.If you miss a class you are responsible for copying the notes from a fellow classmate and then seeing the instructor if you have questions.Class Policies 126 Academic misconduct or any other conduct prohibited by the code of Student Conduct ( stud(-)Dtaffair's.:lb'ill) will not be tolerated and will be reported to the OSU Committee on Academic Misconduct.Any student needing special consideration as a result of a disability must inform the instructor at the beginning of the quarter.Documentation must be presented in a timely manner for all necessary accommodations to be made.Contact the Office for Disability Services, 150 Pomerene hall at 292.

Schedule The class will meet in Kottman Hall 102 on Tuesdays and Thursdays.Sessions will combine lectures with activities and lots of discussion.There are also a number of field trips, details of which will be given as the quarter progresses.Time is set aside at the beginning and end of each class for questions and discussion of aSSignments.

Students should feel free engage in the discussions in class, including asking questions.If you do not w /current/courses/syliabus/NR311syl.html 7/14/2006 Course Syllabus Page 2·of 2 understand a concept or need an example, it is your responsibility to ASK! Chances are that some of your fellow students do not understand either.You do a service to everyone by encouraging clarification.Assessment and Rationale Your grade for the course will be determined on your performance in these areas: Assignment % Value Critiques (x3, each worth 10%) 30 You will be required to critique: 1.

A current television, radio, or newspaper presentation of an snv.An educational activity using Guidelines for Excellence in EE 3.An interpretive event of your choosing Individual Projects 30 Participation Team Presentations You will be required to select one idea/theme/concept at the beginning of the quarter.This idea will be used as the basis for 3 project outlines: 1, A communications message (print, visual, or mass media) 2.

An interpretive event You will be required to prepare a reflective weekly commentary.These will used these to gauge your involvement in topics, independent thought, and critical reflection.In addition, based on your interests in the class, a review of an academic journal for environmental communication, interpretation, or education will be required.Working in teams of 3~5, each team will select an environmental message.

Using theoretical and practical knowledge gained from the class each team will demonstrate, through a presentation to the class, how this message can be manipulated.Grades will be determined by peer and instructor grading.10 30 Total 100 Assignments are due at the beginning of class on the announced date.Re~drafting of assignments may be requested of any assignment receiving less than 60% of possible points.Late assignments, or those that require redrafting, will be devalued at 5% per day - including weekends.

e paCie /current/courses/syllabus/NR311syl.html 7/14/2006 Course Schedule ~~ THE OHIO STATE IlNIVERl;ITY ~ SENR COURSE SOl muLE Foundations of Environmental Communications) Education and Interpretation NR 311 127 Autumn 2005 Course Instructor Joe.Room: 210 Kottman Hall Phone: 292-2265 e-mail', heimlich, email protected osu .Office hours: by appointment Readings assigned weekly for the following week.

Many of the readings will be available online or will be distributed to the class.

htm I Page 1 of 2 7/14/2006 Course Schedule 7 8 9 10 11 Project # 2 Reflection # 5 In class Nov 1 (T) Environmental Interpretation History Principles of Interpretation Nov 3 (Th) Off -Individual Field Trip Group work time Nov 8 (T) Off - Individual Field Trip Group work time Nov 10 (Th) Veterans Day - NO CLASSES Nov 15 (T) Report on Field Trips Critique # 3 Due Journal Review # 2 Due Nov 17 (Th) Environmental Interpretation In Action Project # 3 Due Refection # 6 In class Nov 22 (T) Philosophical Foundations of ECEI in Natural Resources Nov 24 (Th) Thanksgiving - NO CLASSES Nov 29 (T) Student Team Presentations J~~t:.~aLCritique D~e Dec 1 (Th) Student Team Presentations .t9 , ,?",$yU<,:l!J: lj~ p,9" ,, C:hJqr$ ~ ,P§gt;:::.html Page 2 of 2 7/14/2006 Course Syllabus THE OHiO STATE UNIVER$ITY ~ SENR COURSE SYLlABUS Introduction to Forestry, Fisheries, and Wildlife ENR 319 Autumn 2006 Primary Instructor Dr.Johnson, Professor, Fisheries Room: 473-C Kottman Hall 128 Phone: 292-9803 e-majl:jQb.Office hours: by apPointment Secondary Instructors Dr.Amande Rodewalld, Assistant Professor, Wildlife Room: 375C Kottman Hall Phone: office: 247-6099 e-majl:mq,~w.

?g,~ Office hours:' by appointment Teaching Associates Ms.

Ashley Buchanan, Graduate Teaching Associate Room: 247 Kottman Hall Phone: 292-9825 E-mail: b.Office hours: by appointment Course Description Dr.Roger Williams, Associate Professor, Forestry Room: 320C Kottman Hall Phone: 688-4061 e-mail: .Office hours: by appointment Ms Andrea Lindsay, Graduate Teaching Associate Room: 247 Kottman Hall Phone: 292-9825 E-mail:king§ay, email protected §W,~Qq Office hours: by appointment Page 1 of3 This course is an introduction to the basic elements of forestry, fisheries, and wildlife (FFW) eco!ogyand management.It provides students with a comprehensive and integrated introduction to the problems, concepts and strategies that make these disciplines similar, as well as establishing important differences between them.It has also been organized to provide an introduction to non-majors who may not have the opportunity to take further courses in these fields.

Course objectives After successful yompletion of ENR 319, students will be able to: • Discuss the objectives and limitations of forestry, fisheries, and wldllife management.• Explain the structure and dynamics of populations and communities in relation to sustaining resource production and biological diversity.• Discuss allocation and use of forestry, fisheries, and wildlife resources to satisfy competing societal needs and explain how systems can be manipulated to meet those needs.• Use the library efficiently and effectively to find, evaluate, and interpret literature on a matter affecting a FFW resource.

Student Evaluations Over the course of the quarter there will be 4 opportunities for ,students to be evaluated.Your grade wi!! be based on a total of 450 points.We have included a grade record chart for you to keep a record of your grades.

The evaluations are: Item Point Value Annotated Bibliography 50 .

/Midterm Exam 1 Midterm Exam 2 Final Exam 100 100 200 rrentlcourses/syllabus/ AU06/ 4/25/2008 C;ourse Syllabus TOTAL POINTS POSSIBLE Letter Grades 93-100 A 89-92 A86-89 B+ 83-85 B 79-82 B- 129 76-78 C+ 73-75 C 69-72 C66-68 D+ 60-65 D <60 E Grade Record Graded item Annotated Bibliography Midterm Examination #1 Midterm Examination #2 Final Examination Total Page 2 of3 450 Points Received /450= ---- % The midterm examinations will be divided between objective questions and questions requiring short answers, definitions, listing questions, and essays.The final examination wi!! be comprehensive with short answer, essay and objective questions.It will differ from the midterm exams in that integration of knowledge will be stressed.We have found that student attendance is critically important to your success in this course.To reward students with strong attendance records we will be taking roll on ten randomly selected class days this quarter, Students present in class 9 or 10 of those days will receive a bonus of 2% on your final class average.

Students in class 7 or 8 days will receive a bonus of 1 % on your final class average.Course evaluations will be requested from you during this course.We are eager to meet your needs and improve this course.Please feel free to comment, at any time, on positive or negative aspects of our approach or on course content.Disabled students Students with disabilities who need accommodations should see the course instructors during office hours to make arrangements.

special needs must be discussed and arrangements made will in advance (preferably during the first week of classes) of when they are required.Special accommodations may be arranged through the OSU Office of Disability Service, 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Ave., 614/292-3307, websiteottP;/ IQdS&hjQ,stat§&du.Information is also availablle in alternative formats upon request.Don Eckert, School of Natural Resources, 210 Kottman Hall, 2021 Coffey Rd., Columbus, OH 43210-1085, 614/292-2265, , email protected &du.Academic misconduct Submitting plagiarized work to meet academic requirements including the representation of another's work or ideas as one's own; the unacknowledged word or work use of another person's ideas; andlor the falsification, fabrication, or dishonesty in reporting research results shall be grounds for charges of academic misconduct.Class Policies As we are sure you expect us to be well prepared and come to class for every session, we expect the same from you.Exam material will be highly correlated to lecture material; therefore it will benefit you to be in class.

The penalty for Jate papers is 5% per working (weekday) day.Since this penalty is not exorbitant, we will not extend deadlines for any reason.Makeup exams will be offered only under extreme circumstances and will consist of oral or essay questions.If you must leave class early please let us know.It is disconcerting for students to leave class except in an emergency.

Our Teaching Philosophy Our teaching philosophy is very similar to our life philosophies.We give respect and trust to everyone until we are given reason to do otherwise.You are adults and should be treated as such.Therefore, we will not only give you the freedom that comes with this role, but also the responsibility.In return, we, as well as our Teaching Assistants, expect to be given the same respect We are here to present a certain body of knowledge to you, and to help you construct skills that will assist you in learning throughout your academic and professional careers.

Your job is to integrate what we teach into your own background.If something doesn't make sense or is contradictory, then come see us.We will do our best to find a way to 130 ,edu!current!courses/syllabus/AU06/enr319sy l.html 4/25/2008 Course Syllabus Page 3 of3 present the material in a manner that helps you master the information.If we work together as a community in a supportive environment, we guarantee that we will learn as much from each other as you do from us.

~ senr current! coursesl syllabusl AU 061 4/25/2008 Course Schedule ~~ THE OHiO STATE UNIVERSITY ~ SENR COURSE Introduction to Forestry, Fisheries, and Wildlife NR 319 Autumn 2006 Primary Instructor Dr.Johnson, Professor, Fisheries Room: 473-C Kottman Hall Phone: 292-9803 e-mail: , .Office hours: by apPointment Secondary Instructors Dr.

Amande RodewaUd, Assistant Professor, Wildlife Room: 375C Kottman Hall Phone: office: 247-6099 ewmail:f.Office hours: by appointment Teaching Associates Ms.Ashley Buchanan, Graduate Teaching Associate Room: 247 Kottman Hall Phone: 292-9825 E-mail: email protected ~"nJJ, email protected $J,L.l Office hours: by appointment Course Outline (Instructor initials indicated in parentheses) Date Topic Forestry, Fisheries, and Wildlife Systems Dr.Roger Williams, Associate Professor, Forestry Room: 320C Kottman Hall Phone: 688-4061 e-mail: YVi,H!,~m.

Office hours: by appointment Ms Andrea Lindsay, Graduate Teaching Associate Room: 247 Kottman Hall Phone: 292-9825 E-mail: ,!"In,g,$J:~y,.,'p'?g~ senr current! coursesl sy lIabusl AU 061 Page 2 of2 4/2512008 Course Syllabus ~ THE oHiO STATE UNIVERSITY ~ SENR CONCEPTS OF PARKS AND RECREATION Environment and Natural Resources 340 Winter 2008 Credits: 3 Time and Place: M-W 3:30 - 5:00 pm -- 210 An.INSTRUCTORS: Dan West John Hunter Email: email protected Email: email protected ",-$j:ru.JLtL l!§' COURSE OBJECTIVES By the end of the quarter, students will be able to: The history of parks and recreation in the u.The rationa!e for park designation and organized provision of recreation opportunities The structure and goals of agencies providing park and recreation seNices under various types of control: Federal, State, Local, Private Key issues in the management of parks and recreation services: funding, sustalnability, economic and socia! benefits The terminology of field and primary sources of information for parks and recreation professionals How to prepare for a career in parks and recreation administration and the professional standards of the field Page 1 of2 NOTE: Changes to the syllabus may be made throughout the course.Any modification will be announced in class and or posted on Carmen.If you miss a course it is your responsibility to contact a classmate for any changes announced and to obtain a copy of class notes from that class.

In order to establish a level of professionalism throughout this course, all homework assignments and the group project will be submitted in a typed format.Handwritten documents will NOT be accepted.Students with special needs must receive pre~approval from the instructor before submitting a non typed document.TEXTBOOK Kraus' Recreation and Leisure in Modern Society, 8th edition.

COURSE FORMAT Most classes will involve lectures and discussion based upon the content of the course text book.There will also be a number of guest speakers coming from various parks and recreation backgrounds.Students are strongly encouraged to ask questions and participate in class discussions.

Students are expected to complete each day's reading assignment before class.To encourage timely completion of the reading assignments, students will submit a number of short homework assignments.Because critical thinking, written communication skills, and group team work are all important for successful park and recreation professionals, students will be required to participate in one group project.EXAMS 133 Two equally weighted exams will be given during the quarter.Students will be advised of the nature of the exams in advance of the examination period.

/currenticourses/WI08/ 4/2512008 Course Syllabus Page 2 of2 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS There will be a total of (4) homework assignments consisting of questions from the "Questtons for class Discussion or Essay Examinations" section at the end of each chapter.Students are to answer concisely, but completely.Please submit a typed hard copy of your homework to the instructor in class by the due date.(It will be your responsibility to get the hard copy to the instructor by the end of class on the due date.) GROUP PROJECT Each student wi!! participate in one group project.

The group wi!! consists of approximately 5 students and the group selection will occur during the second week of class.Group projects will consist of an in-depth study of a particular topic.Students will be evaluated on their overall presentation and demonstrated knowledge of the subject matter.Groups will be provided some class time to work on their project, but some outside classroom lime will be needed to complete Ihe project.The group project will be broken into two separate grading opportunities.

Installment #1 : Installment #1 wHi consists of the group identifying and selecting a topic, preparing an outline of the topic matter, and identifying how the topic will be presented.The group will identify a group project leader, as well as identifying the roles of each group member.All group project topics must be approved by the class instructors.Installment #2: Installment #2 will consist of a classroom presentation not to exceed 15 minutes in length.Each group wi!! provide a hard copy of the project to the instructors and will be required to present their project to the class.

The classroom presentation wi!! be limited to a maximum of 15 minutes.The group project will be graded on the following - group participation, concise summary of the main points, logical flow of presentation, relationship to concepts presented in class and overall quality of any material presented or handed out.A number of possible group project topics will be provided within the first two weeks of class.However, the list is only a list of possible topics.If the group would like to identify a topic of their own choosing, it can do so with the permission of the class instructors.

GRADING & IMPORTANT DATES COMPONENT POINTS POSSIBLE % FINAL GRADE DATE EXAM #1 100 25% EXAM #2 100 25% Comprehensive GROUP PROJECT 100 25% Installment 1 40 Points Inslallment 2 60 Points HOMEWORK 40 10% CLASS PARTICIPATION 60 15% MAKEUP WORK AND EXAMS Make-up exams will not be given without prior permission from the instructors.There will be no make-up opportunity for missed homework aSSignments.Carmen is a web-based system that allows you to correspond with the instructor, obtain class assignments, and check your grades.The instructors will use this system to communicate with you about the course.

You are responsible for checking the course site and you OSU email account al least weekly during the quarter for course updates.Carmen can be accessed through any computer with web access, including the computer labs on campus.p~,ge rrenticourses/WI08/ 4/2512008 Course Syllabus THE 01110 STATE UNIVERSITY ~ SENR CONCEPTS OF PARKS AND RECREATION Environment and Natural Resources 340 Win1e,2008 Credits: 3 Time and Place: M-W 3:30 - 5:00 pm -- 210 An.

134 INSTRUCTORS: Dan West John Hunter Course Outline DATE TOPIC Friday Jan4 Introduction: Monday Jan 7 Guest Speaker COURSE SCHEDULE READING Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Wednesday Jan 9 Group Project team selection and topic introduction Chapter 3 Monday Wednesday Wednesday Monday Wednesday Monday Wednesday Monday Wednesday Monday Wednesday Monday Wednesday Monday Wednesday t.$~"p,g,gfil: Jan14 Jan 16 Jan 23 Jan 28 Jan 30 Feb4 Feb 6 Feb 11 Feb 13 Feb 18 Feb 20 Feb 25 Feb 27 March 3 March 5 Group Presentation Class Prep time Guest Speakers Exam Review: Group Projects Update by instructors EXAM #1 Guest Speaker: Group Presentation Class Prep time Guest Speaker Exam Review: Make up day for Presentations EXAM #2 rrenticourses/WI08/ Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter 9 Chapter 10 Chapter 11 Chapter 12 Chapter 13 Comprehensive Page 1 of 1 ASSIGNMENT DUE 135 Homework #1 Project Instaliment #1 due Ali Groups Homework #2 Groups #1 and #2 Presentation Homework #3 Groups #3 and #4 Presentation Groups #5 and #6 Presentation Groups # 7 and #8 Presentation Groups #9 and #10 Presentation Homework #4 4/2512008 Course Syllabus THE 01110 STATE UNIVERSITY Water Quality Management ENR355 Instructor Dr.Virginie Bouchard 412B Kottman Hall PQuChefd.§@o§V&dY TeL 688-0268 Office Hours: TR 1 :00 - 2:00 pm TA Katie Hossler 412A Kottmen Hell bQ§§!§! .

~ SENR Office Hours: T 1 :00-3:00 pm: W 2:00-3:00 pm COURSE Office Hour Policy: If you are not available to meet with us during these hours, you may call, e-mail, or see us after class to schedule an appointment at another time.If you have just a few quick questions, we may want to discuss them right after class.Lecture Time/Locetion: TR 10:30 - 11 :48 em, KH 333 Course Description Page lof3 This course will introduce critical issues relating to water qLiantity and quality in the world, with a particular focus on North America.The first few lectures will be dedicated to concepts of water scarcity and competition for water at local and state scales.

The remainder of the quarter will address questions related to water quality, the impairment of aquatic ecosystems and the impacts on human health.Concepts on how to determine water quality via the examination of physical, chemica! and biological indicators will be introduced.Students will develop an understanding of the causes, consequences and solutions of diverse types (i., agricultural, domestic, industrial) of water pollution.

Appreciate the extent and significance of the issues related to water quality and quantity facing the world.Understand the impacts of human activities (via changes in chemical, biological and physical parameters) on water quality.Expose students to monitoring methods used to assess water quality in various types of ecosystems.Encourage critical thinking and synthesis, particularly in terms of how changes in behavior and proper management can protect water resources.Engage students in contemporary debates related to the growing scarcity of clean water in the world.

Text A textbook is not required for the class.Carmen Class notes 136 We will use Carmen (htt.n,-Q'§J::t,-~gy) throughout the quarter for announcements, assignments, additional readings and other material not handed out in class.You are responsible for checking the class web page every day to look for announcements or class changes.At the end of each week, class notes for the two lectures of the following week will be posted on Carmen.Class notes will be completed and explained during lectures.Students are encouraged to download and print the notes from the web before coming to the lectures.

Course Evaluation Homework will be distributed throughout the quarter and will essentially consist of discussion of articles, calculation and short-answer questions.Students will have a week to turn in their homework.The midterm and the final will be one hour and 18 minutes in duration.

The midterm will cOVer material up to Feb 5; the final (during final week) will cover material from Feb 12 - Mar 5.

AU examinations are closed book, and will include multiple-choice, true/false, and short-answer.If you miss an exam, you must provide a written excuse as to why you were absent.If you fall to do so, or if your excuse is not acceptable, you will be given a zero for that exam.rrenticourses/WI08/ 4/2512008 Course Syllabus Page 2 of3 Grading Scale: Homework (4) 20 pts A 94-100 C 77-76 Midterm 30 pts A- 90-93 C- 70-73 Final (during final week) 30 pts B+ 87-89 D+ 67-69 Lab report 15 pts B 84-86 D 60-66 Participation in class 5 pts B- 80-83 F < 60 100 pts C+ 77-79 Field Trip A field trip is scheduled on Monday Jan 29 during regular class hours.

The location of the field trip has not yet been determined, but will be near campus.Students will be exposed to water quality sampling.Lab Session Each student group will schedule a 1.5-hour lab during the fifth week of class.

During this Jab session, each group will analyze samples from the field.Analysis will involve determination of chemical, physical, and biological water quality parameters.The instructors will gather the data collected by each group, and this data will be compiled and then distributed to the class.This data will be used to write the individual lab report.Lab Report Each student will be required to write a 1 D-page individual lab report.

Specific guidelines will be given in class.Academic misconduct Submitting plagiarized work to meet academic requirements, including the representation of another's work or ideas as one's own; the unacknowledged use and/or paraphrasing of another person's work; and/or the inappropriate unacknowledged use of another person's idea; and/or the falsification, fabrication, or dishonesty in reporting research results, shall be grounds for charges of academic misconduct.Tentative Course Schedule Week 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Day Jan 3 Jan 8 Jan 10 Jan 15 Jan 17 Jan 22 Jan 24 137 Jan 29 Jan 31 Feb 5 Feb 7 Feb 12 Feb 14 Feb 19 Feb 21 Feb 26 Topic Introduction of the Class Water Quantity and Usage of Water Water Quantity and Usage of Water (con't) First homework Assigned.Due on Jan 17 Ecology of Aquatic Ecosystems Water Chemistry and Water Quality Indicators Nutrients and Eutrophication Nutrients and Eutrophication (con't) Second.Due in lab *** Field sampling *** No lecture - - - labs will be scheduled Urban Runoff and Waste Water Midterm (covers material up to Feb 5) *** Bacterial Contamination - Guest lecture Third Homework Assigned.Due on Feb 19 *,,* Tour of a Waste Water Facility (Jackson Pike Treatment Plant) Aquatic Toxicology Thermal Pollution Pesticides and Metals rrenticourses/WI08/ 4/2512008 Course Syllabus 10 to course page Feb 28 Mar4 Fourth Homework Assigned.Due on Mar 4 Acid Pollution Oil Pollution Mar 6 *** Wrap-up Final on Tuesday March 11, 9:30-10:48 am (covers material Feb 12 - Mar 6) rrenticourses/WI08/ Page 3 of3 4/2512008 The Ohio State University School of Environment and Natural Resources Knowlton School of Architecture Environment & Natural Resources 367, Landscape Architecture 367: Professor John Simpson The Making and Meaning of the American Landscape COURSE SYLLABUS If we want to understand ourselves, we would do well to take a searching look at our landscapes.Peirce Lewis, 1979 We all share a rich legacy: our landscape.

Should i order a custom coursework ecology university platinum american custom writing

It is our heritage made visible for each landscape records the forces, both physical and human, that shaped it.

Each is unique for those forces vary endlessly in a wonderful form of life-giving alchemy.The landscape is often our autobiography as we imprint it with our actions, values, polides, and programs 10. Mr. Floyd Simpson, Adjunct Professor. 11. Mr. Joseph Varon, Adjunct Professor. B. Course Syllabi. 1. BCN 1210C Construction Materials. 2. BCN 1251   Presentation: “GIS - Helping Plan for Florida's Future”. Society of   You will also write a reaction paper for each video viewed in class (single-spaced, at least one..The landscape is often our autobiography as we imprint it with our actions, values, polides, and programs.

SOlne imprints last for centuries, others are erased and rewritten more rapidly, leaving behind a complex layering of messages-past and present, physical and cultural, public and private, local and national, legal and moral, rational and emotional, aesthetic 138 and economic, Euro-American and Native American.These messages tell a story of many meanings, written by many hands, that reveals the past, explains the present, and foreshadows the future.It is a partly factual and partly anecdotal story because the landscape is both objective and subjective.

ENR/LARCH 367 is a 5 credit undergraduate lecture/recitation course satisfying the Culture and Ideas requirement in the university General Education Curriculum (GEC) and the second Writing-intheCurriculum GEC requirement.The course is open to and designed for all undergraduates; its only prerequisite is completion of the first Writing-in-the-Curriculum GEC requirement (English 110, 111, or equivalent) help me with a wwi thesis proposal British Writing Graduate.The course is open to and designed for all undergraduates; its only prerequisite is completion of the first Writing-in-the-Curriculum GEC requirement (English 110, 111, or equivalent).The class meets on M/W /F at 10:30 PM in Knowlton #250 for lecture given by the course instructor and it meets in sections of not more than 25 students for recitation on T /R conducted by a graduate teaching assistant.Through lectures, assigned readings, recitation discussion, and writing assignments, we'll explore and interpret significant forces that shaped the American landscape.

These economic, environmental, political, and socio-cultural forces will be examined in their historical as well as their contemporary contexts.We'll examine broad national policies and programs that shaped the general landscape and the idiosyncratic forces specific to a local area.In so doing we'll trace the development of an agrarian landscape from the "wilderness" encountered by Euro-American pioneers as settlement progressed westward of the Appalachian Mountains and the later evolution of the city into the contemporary suburban landscape.The Midwest and central Ohio will be used as case studies to illustrate the interplay of national forces and themes with local forces and themes.Through this examination the course seeks to instill a set of values and analytical skills transferable to the study of other landscapes.

The course's dual designation has a profound effect on the course design and delivery.The lecture component primarily satisfies the Culture and Ideas designation, and, hence, is taught much like a history course in which class time is used to illuminate the meaning of the content presented in the assigned readings rather than on the repetition of key factual material contained in the readings."Lectures" are informal and focus on a wide ranging exploration and interpretation of the readings from the instructor's viewpoint.Slides and videos are used frequently to illustrate major themes.Recitation focuses on the writing component of the class, providing in-class writing instruction and writing activities responsive to requirements set by the Writing-in-the-Curriculum sequence, while also providing a limited opportunity to discuss issues and questions raised in lectures.

In addition, background readings assigned in support of the writing component are discussed in terms of approach, point of view, content, and style.Recitations also provide in-class instruction and opportunities to develop oral communication skills.Active participation and dialogue are emphasized and facilitated.The cOlmection that binds together the two components-lecture and recitation-is the joint emphasis on the making and meaning of the landscape.

Beyond that general thematic linkage, the lectures and the recitation activities are separate.

The general learning goals of ENR/LARCH 367 are: 1) to enable the student to better perceive, understand, and interpret the contemporary American landscape as the product of a gradual developmental process involving the interaction of many physical forces, public policies and programs, and socio-cultural values; 2) to facilitate the student's development of a personal ethic toward the landscape that is responsive to America's cultural and biophysical diversity; 3) to refine the student's ability to think critically and creatively and to express those thoughts effectively in oral and written form: to formulate a question or opinion; to structure supporting evidence and arguments; and to effectively express resulting beliefs verbally and in writing.EVALUATION METHODS AND COURSE POLICIES Course grades will be based on the following components: • Every student will complete a midterm and a comprehensive final examination, both in essay format.The midterm will consist of one essay question you choose to answer from a set of three selected by the instructor from the study set included below.The final will consist of two questions.The first will be a question you choose to answer from a set of three selected by the instructor from the study set below, covering the content since the midterm.

The second will be a question you choose to answer fro,,!, a set of three comprehensive questions selected by the instructor from the study set.All tests are closed bookno notes or other reference materials may be used during the tests.Any evidence of academic misconduct will trigger standard university procedures as specified in the Code of Student Conduct.As essays, the 139 tests provide opportunities for developing and displaying writing skills, in addition to demonstrating knowledge of the course content.The graduate teaching assistants, under the instructor's supervision, will grade the tests based on: (1) the recall of pertinent facts (dates, people, events, actions - outcomes, etc.

) from the lectures, readings and other class components; this will constitute approximately 65% of the overall test grade; (2) your ability to interconnect and interpret the material; this will constitute approximately 20% of the overall test grade; and, (3) the quality and effectiveness of your response as a piece of expository writing; this will constitute approximately 15% of the overall test grade.Every test answer will be read and graded by two TAs, working independently, based on a set of general grading criteria that identifies major ideas, themes, and key facts that should be discussed in the response.These two grades will then be averaged to determine the actual grade received.Should the two grades differ by more than 10%, then the test will be read and graded by a third TA and the two highest of the three grades will be averaged to determine the final grade.2 • Every student will write a short (circa 1,250 words) response to a contemporary landscape issue.

This may focus on a controversy regarding a local, state, or federal land use policy or program, the management practices of a specific place, or some general philosophical debate concerning the landscape.The essay should describe the issue, outline the range of positions, and present evidence and arguments in support of your opinion.Supplemental reading and research into the issue will inform the paper.Drafts of the papers will be exchanged in recitation and the set discussed in terms of approach, point of view, content, and style, before final submission.The graduate teaching assistants, under the instructor's supervision, will grade tl1e submissions.

NOTE: a complete, well-crafted draft must be submitted and the assigned editing on another person's paper completed according to requirements to receive full credit for the final paper; failure to do so will result in the final grade being reduced up to 20% of the points possible for the assignment.• Every student will write a moderate length (circa 2,500 words) descriptive analysis of a specific landscape (a single site, area, or community), landscape element (the house, yard, garage, fence, town square, main street, strip, highway, farm, barn, etc.), or policy! program (farm policy, zoning, subdivision regulations, sign codes, architectural standards, highway and mass transit programs, etc.) that affects the landscape's physical character or socio-cultural meaning.The nature of the analysis may be primarily historical (explaining the physical and socio-cultural forces that shaped the landscape), or interpretative of the contemporary landscape (assessing the meaning we might assign to it).

Library and! or field research into the issue will inform the paper.The graduate teaching assistants, under the instructor's supervision, will grade the submissions.NOTE: a complete, wellcrafted draft must be submitted and the aSSigned editing on another person's paper completed according to requirements to receive full credit for the final paper; failure to do so will result in the final grade being reduced up to 20% of the points possible for the assignment.• Lastly, every student will be evaluated for effective participation in recitation, including the frequency of attendance, the level and effectiveness of participation in discussion and the debate, and the quality of your in-class writing exercises and other class activities.The graduate teaching assistants, under the instructor's supervision, will evaluate student participation.

Each course component is worth a deSignated number of points as indicated below, At the conclusion of the course, the total number of points each student has received will be calculated along with an arithmetic class average.Grade ranges then will be established in accordance with Faculty Rule 33357-21, which defines the University standard for marks.As per this standard and past course experience, the average grade will likely fall in the high "C" to low "B" range.This means most students will receive a "C+" or "B-" for the class, although course grades are not set to a preestablished 140 curve and every effort is made to adjust the overall class grade range to fairly reflect the outcome of this particular course offering.Grades are established in part on an absolute scale in which you're evaluated in comparison to OUf expectations and in part on a comparative scale in which you're evaluated against your peers.

No extra credit points are available in this course.Component Midterm Exam Final Exam Environmental Issue Landscape Analysis Participa tion Total Possible Points 150 pts.Finals may be picked-up from the course instructor at the conclusion of finals week or you can give me a self-addressed stamped envelope and I will mail it to you.Submission of Late Work Work is due at the designated time.If you're not satisfied with your work at the due date, submit it any way.

NO LATE WORK WILL BE ACCEPTED WITHOUT EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES APPROVED BY YOUR TA OR THE COURSE INSTRUCTOR.These include unforeseen or unavoidable circumstances such as a personal illness that results in a physician's care or some other crisis.It does not include, " overslept," " had to work," " had two other papers due that day," " just wasn't done," or " forgot.

" If some reasonable complication precludes you from completing and submitting your work on time, contact your TA or the course instructor immediately to explain the situation and make alternate arrangements.

Missed Tests and Assigmnents From time to time, legitimate circumstances complicate our lives and necessitate adjustments in our activities.When such circumstances arise, we try to work with you to establish an appropriate and reasonable response to your specific situation.This usually results in either a make-up exam or assigmnent, or an Incomplete; but you have to be mature and considerate in your conduct toward the course and the university.In all cases, prompt communication is required.As soon as a compromising situation arises, let use know.

We can't respond to your situation if we don't know about it.The most common mistake students make when such a situation arises Ls that they wait too long to seek assistance, thus compounding the problem.Make-up tests and assIgnments may be given under the following conditions: (1) the regularly scheduled activity was missed due to an unforeseen and unavoidable circumstance, such as serious personal illness or crisis (job related circumstances usually will not be accepted); (2) in the event of a crisis, either the student, a doctor, or family member must notify the instructor of the problem in a timely manner (not a week after the fact); explicit messages left through the School office are acceptable if the instructor cannot be reached directly; and (3) at the earliest appropriate time, the student must meet with the instructor to verify the circumstance, and, provided the instructor accepts the circumstances as valid, to schedule the make-up.We assume if you're sick enough to miss a test or assignment, you're sick enough to go to a doctor.Should tl,e crisis preclude the student from completing the course, an Incomplete may be granted, but only under the same provisions for extraordinary circumstances and for notification, verification, and rescheduling outlined above.

In addition, the student must have completed the majority of course work, as measured by the percent of available points, prior to 5:00 PM, the last day of classes.The remainder of the course work must be completed before 5:00 PM, of the fifth Friday of the next quarter.If the student is unable to complete the majority of the course work during the quarter, s/he should withdraw from the course rather than seek an Incomplete.141 Should you encounter personal problems during the quarter or simply wish to discuss the course in greater detail drop by during office hours (233 KnowltonHal1; M!W immediately after class), or call for an appointment (292-8395).The best way to contact me outside of class or office hours is by E-mail email protected Office hours and E-mail addresses for fue Graduate Teaching Assistants will be announced in recitation sections.This class, like Ohio State in general, will be as personal or as impersonal as YQ.4 READINGS The following materials are required.Copies may be purchased at campus bookstores or from local bookstores and online booksellers.

The materials are also on closed reserve in the Knowlton and AG libraries.Visions of Paradise: glimpses of our landscape's legacy.

(Berkeley: University of California Press).Yearning for the Land: a search for homeland in Scotland and America (New York: Vintage Books).The hardcover version is identical, just more expensive: Yearning for the Land: a search for the important of place (New York: Pantheon Books, 2002) • -------------------------------.Dam! water, power, politics, and preservation in Hetch Hetchy and Yosemite National Park (New York: Pantheon Books).The following recitation 'text' is encouraged as excerpts will be read and discussed.You'll be able to read the excerpts on CARMEN.

If you care to purchase your own copy of the book, which is no longer in print, used copies may be found online and in campus bookstores.However, purchase of the book is not required for the course, • Slavic, Scott and Terrell Dixon, eds.Being in the World: an environmental reader for writers (New York: MacMillan).For those who wish further detail, optional readings are also made available from the following sources on closed reserve: • Conzen, Michael, ed.

The Making of the American Landscape (New York: Routledge).Major Problems in American Environmental History: documents and essays (LeXington: D.

Additional Sources (some available on closed reserve) include: • The Everyday Writer by Andrea Lunsford and Robert Connors, a standard text used by the English Department in English 110 and other courses, so many of you may already be familiar with it.It's also readily available at campus bookstores.

Use it as a reference to answer specific questions regarding teclmical writing issues as well as for general advice and guidance on structure and style.

It serves as the standard in this course.• Norton Book of Nature Writing (Elder and Finch, eds.; 1990) and Bergan's much shorter collection of historically significant writing about wilderness/nature, The Wilderness Reader (University of Nevada Press, 1994), are excellent anthologies of Ilature writing that might be of value as a reference on the writing assignments.They also provide good supplements to components of the course content.• Roderick Nash's widely used American Environmentalism: Readings in Conservation History (McGraw Hill, 3,d ed.

, 1990), like Conzen and Merchant, is a good supplement to the course lecture content.It also includes excerpts from outstanding nature writing that might serve as useful models for the writing assignments.• John Hanson Mitchell's Trespassing (Addison Wesley, 1998) provides a faSCinating examination of the many issues related to property rights, both historically and currently, using a community outside Boston.• William Cronan's Nature's Metropolis (Norton, 1991) explores the development of Chicago from an environmental history perspective similar to that used in this course.• John Stilgoe's Outside Lies Magic (Walker, 1998) shares the joys to be gained from walking or riding around the local landscape in search of clues to the landscape's legacy.

• Grady Clay's Real Places (UniverSity of Chicago, 1994) examines the vernacular urban and suburban landscapes in a witty and insightful manner.THE WRITING COMPONENTS 142 Development of your writing skills is central to this class.As you know, writing proficiency is among the most fundamental skills of an educated person and among the most important abilities for daily professional and personal life.Yet writing is work for even the most talented and experienced.Few authors produce quality writing without careful preparation, diligent editing, and repeated revision.

Since writing is partly creative and partly mechanical, like most skills, it cannot be taught in the sense that you can simply listen to lectures and read books on the subject to fully develop your abilities-your skill and comfort improve with practice and guidance.Hence, we'll serve more as your writing "coaches" or Ifadvisors" than as your "instructors" in the classic academic sense.To refine your writing skills, you'll read, discuss, and respond in writing to literary nonfiction and scholarly nonfiction works related to the course subject.Your written responses will include creative narrative and analysis, scholarly narrative, and critical analysis.Preparation time will range from immediate in-class responses to exam questions and exercises, to moderate time frames of about three weeks.

The length of the response will range from a very short response of less than 500 words on the exams and exercises, to 1,250 words on the short assignment, to a moderate length response of 2,500 words on the longer landscape analysis assignment.In-class exercises will be critiqued and discussed by classmates.Draft submissions for each writing assignment will be discussed as a set in recitation, and subsequently copied and distributed to other recitation classmates for detailed discussion.The TAs also will mark drafts with suggestions for improvement before the final submission.

Evaluation Criteria Each writing assignment, other than exams, will be evaluated on the following general criteria: Criteria Quality of content Effectiveness of style Technical writing quality Submission standards Total % of Points Allocated 50% 15% 25% 10% 100% Quality of content includes the clarity of your main points, the quality of the supporting arguments and evidence, and the overall level of insight.Effectiveness of style refers to the manner in which language and structure are used to create an appropriate and engaging tone that communicates your message and meaning.Technical writing quality focuses on proper paragraph and sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, use of citations, and bibliography format.Submission standards evaluate your adherence to the specifications listed below.Submission Standards To enable us to concentrate on your content, style, and overall writing effectiveness, and not be bothered by incidental differences in format, each submission must adhere to the specific format requirements set by your recitation TA.

These standards will be discussed in recitation before the first writing assignment.Writing Hints and Suggestions Experience has shown the most common problems on the exams are, in descending order of frequency and seriousness: • The response did not answer the question.Instead, it gave unwanted or irrelevant material.Make sure you understand what the question asks and then provide the responsive material.• The response did not include sufficient detail.

Generalities are fine, but detail and specifics matter! They distinguish superior knowledge and recall from the average.• The response contained inaccurate material.This is a relatively rare problem, but when it occurs, it obviously undermines your response.• Many technical writing errors plagued the response.Again, this is relatively rare, but problems with overall organization, paragraph and sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, etc.

, affect the quality of 143 your response, which should tell a factual story in an engaging and articulate manner.Take 5 minutes to organize and design your response before you begin writing.It will be time well spent! Make an outline on the inside cover of your blue book.Begin the outline by re-phrasing the exam question as a thesis statement.Refer to the statement during the construction of the quick outline or plan.

Don't pad your answer or use flowery language to impress.Write short, crisp sentences and paragraphs.Make every statement count; say it once, and move on-don't repeat material.Length is not important; content is! In most cases, the best answers only run 6 to 8 pages (of the 16 in the booklet).

Successful responses to the three writing assignlnents share certain common characteristics: • They tell a complete story in compelling narrative form, a story with a beginning, a middle, and an end: an introduction, a body of evidence, and a conclusion.

They are stories with a clear point or message supported by reasonable arguments.They are authoritative, but not dictatorial; they show and explain rather than tell and preach.• They have a clear sense of organization and structure that guides the reader.This is communicated in the introduction, and reinforced at several key points in the body.Let the reader know what to expect so slhe can anticipate what comes next.

Don't lead them by the nose and don't make them wander aimlessly through your thoughts.Yet, don't treat them like children by repeating things unnecessarily or in juvenile terms.• They have an effeclive 'hook' in the introduction that captures the reader's attention.The hook may be a controversial statement, an anecdote or analogy that illustrates your point in a manner the reader might relate to, or a vexing question or problem that tweaks their interest.• They present sound, well strnctured arguments and evidence in support of your position, point, or message.

The nature of your arguments will vary from assignment to assignment (obviously what constitutes an argument in the more creative narrative will differ from those in the more analytical critique).Formal arguments are presented as assertions (what you believe to be the case) supported by evidence in the form of quotes from experts, personal description, or anecdotal stories that illustrate a point.Informal arguments typically take the form of description that makes a case for some perception, reaction, or point of view.Regardless of the form followed, your writing should avoid trite statements, generalizations, stereotypes, cliches, jargon, and unsupported assertions.

• They have a definable style or tone that is appropriate for the assignment created by the use of language (adjectives, adverbs, sentence rhythm, paragraph structure), recurring theme, analogy, and allusion.Successful papers have a 'voice' in which the reader can hear the author speaklng.They have a narrative drive that carries the reader forward.They have a smooth sequence of thoughts that build progressively to the conclusion, and have smooth transitions from one thought and subsection to the next.• They have a conclusion with some punch that goes beyond mere regurgitation of the paper's prior points, arguments, and themes.

7 A note on plagiarism: We consider the inappropriate use of another's work as your own as a very serious offense.Any sign of such academic misconduct will initiate university procedures specified in the Code of Conduct.If you have any questions on the proper use of another's words or ideas in your work, see your TA and/ or check The Everyday Writer for standards.BE FOREWARNED: YOU MUST CITE SOURCES PROPERLY IF YOU OBTAIN INFORMATION FROM THE WEB.While the Web can be a useful aid in your search for material, DO NOT rely on it as the only source.

It is NOT a substitute for good library research, and will NOT be accepted as such.Suggestions for Success: to make the course as enjoyable and meaningful as possible, we encourage you to, 144 • Attend all classes-the importance of this cannot be overstated as the vast majority of people who have difficulty in this class do so because of infrequent attendance.• Prepare for lecture by having read in detail and made notes on the required reading prior to the class for which it was assigned.While we can't guarantee you'll find all the reading interesting, it is, nonetheless, important.It's very important to keep up as best you can.

Don't expect all the reading material to be covered in lecture-much of it is background that enhances and augments the lectures and may not be directly discussed in class, yet the best answers on the exams will respond to it.Writing is both very personal, since we often express imler feelings, and very public, since others read them.In this way, it's much like public speaking.We often become defensive and sensitive to criticism, whether the criticism was offered as constructive or not.Try to be open to comments and, when making comments to others, try to avoid being critical of or insensitive to them as people.• Review lecture and reading notes with others in the class prior to the exams-form a study group with friends or those who sit near you.The class has a lot of memorization (although we don't set out to make it that way, we still expect you to know facts and dates in addition to the general trends).The best way we've found to do this is with a study group.

• Don't read and write in isolation! Discuss the readings and your papers with others while you're working on them.Get feedback and comments both in recitation and outside class.• Actively participate during class-ask questions, be involved mentally.We've learned over the years that there is a loose correlation between this and one's grade.

QUESTION POOL FOR THE MIDTERM AND FINAL The course instructor will select three questions for the midterm exam from the following list; you will then select one of the three to answer on the exam.• AlUle Spirn has written about the concept of 'deep structure' -that for any landscape, there are a few fundamental physical and/ or socio-cultural forces that most governed its development; consequently, they offer a useful guide to understanding of the landscape.I've proposed that two physical forces have been particularly important in the making of central Ohio: glaciation and plant succession.Describe how these forces shaped this landscape and how they continue to influence it today.

• Compare and contrast the landscape values held by James Kilbourne and Jonathan Alder, as representatives of Euro-Americans and Native Americans, respectively.

• From soil exhaustion to forest and wildlife depletion, Euro-Americans devastated each 'paradise' landscape they encountered as settlement raced westward across the continent in the 1700s and 1800s.What landscape values and government policies contributed to this wholesale environmental change? g • We saw a striking satellite image of central Ohio that illustrated the differing landscape philosophies of Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton.Describe each leader's philosophy and outline the means each used to shape the nation before, during, and after the Washington administration.How are their philosophies and the means they used to implement them visible in our landscape today? • Discuss the sequence of steps that resulted in permanent Euro-American settlement on the Great Plains.• Why was America so obsessed with western expansion despite the many environmental obstacles? Describe the principal attitudes and philosophies affecting westward expansion across the continent in the 1800s.

• Describe how continental America might have differed had it been colonized and settled by Europeans from the west coast progressing eastward, rather than from the east coast progressing westward.• Describe the physical and socia-cultural factors that most differentiated John Muir's Old World 145 boyhood home from his New World boyhood home.What meanings can be seen in these differences today? • Discuss John Muir's immigration experience and the motives underlying it, from Old World to New, and then westward across the continent.• Describe Jolm Wesley Powell's alternate vision for western settlement and development and explain why it was, for the most part, ignored.• What was Frederick Jackson Turner's F,.

Thesis and how was it the product of 19th century American thinking about the West? How is it evident today? The course instructor will select three questions for part one of the final exam from the following list; you will then select one of the three to answer on the exam.• How did traditional American landscape values change throughout the 1800s? Begin by stating the core landscape values typified by James Kilbourne, then sketch incremental markers of change to those values, concluding with the Hetch Hetchy debate.• How did the emergence of scientific method and rational thinking change American environmental attitudes in the mid-1800s? Who were key contributors in this shift in popular thought? Does this paradigm still dominate public opinion about environmental stewardship? • Discuss how the establishment and initial management of Yellowstone National Park reflected 19th century American landscape values and perceptions.How are current public perceptions of park and NPS management practices affected by this legacy? • How have the concepts of preservation and conservation changed from the late 1800s to today and who have been the key advocates for each definition? • Discuss the arguments pro / con for the proposal to dam Hetch Hetchy, and explain how those arguments arose from the context of the times: the Conservation Movement and the Progressive Era.

How do those arguments continue today in national policy debates over the public domain? • The American landscape is based on the rational - scientific-based thinking of the Enlightenment perhaps more than that of any other large nation.Yet such thinking may overlook some phenomenon 9 that affect the human experience to which other 'non-rational' ways of thought are more open.Discuss how our landscape is a product of the Enlightenment and how alternate ways of 'knowing' may better respond to some phenomenon.• Explain how Olmsted's (and Vaux's) designs for Central Park and Riverside gave physical form to the suburban landscape aesthetic and social preferences emerging in the 19th century.How is this form visible today in residential developments, as well as apartment complexes, office and industrial parks, college campuses, and public parks? • How have local, state, and federal governments promoted suburbia, and what have been some of the key socia-cultural and urban costs of this preferential treatment? • Discuss the role of the courts in shaping our landscape since WW-II.

How has this role complimented or been at odds with environmental legislation? • Compare and contrast the 'walking city form: 'streetcar form: and 'auto-oriented form' for the city of Columbus.What physical forces, social policies and programs, and landscape values shaped those forms? The course instructor will select three questions for part two of the final exam from the following list; you will then select one of the three to answer on the exam.• Define' ceremonial time' and 'landscape literacy' and apply the concepts to the central Ohio landscape.No concept has shaped the American landscape more.

Explain its influence on our physical and socio-culturallan~scapes.• From the Treaty of Paris in 1783 until the Depression era, the government sought to rid itself of the public domain.• Discuss how consideration of land and the environment as commodities, as (private) property, have shaped the American landscape.

• Describe how perception of the New World as a vacant, virgin land, as a 'blank slate' free from the historical bonds that tethered the Old World to its thousand-year settlement past, shaped the 146 development of the American landscape.• Define and discuss 'stewardship' as presented in class and trace the development of it as both a goal and behavior over the past 200 years.10 DAILY LECTURE CALENDAR 3/24 M 3/26 W 3/28 F 3/31 M 4/2 W 4/4 F 4/7 M 4/9 W 115 4/11 F 4/14 M 4/16 W 4/18 F 4/21 M 4/23 W 4/25 F 4/28 M 4/30 W 5/2 F 5/5 M 5/7 W 5/9 F 5/12 M 5/14 W 5/16 F 5/19 M 5/21 W 5/23 F 5/26 M 5/28 W 5/30 F 6/4 W Assigned Readings V ~ Visions of Paradise; Y ~ Yearning for the Land; 0 ~ Dam!; # ~ Carmen Course introduction, ceremonial time & landscape literacy V, 1-9; 203-206 Deep structure: time lines, glaciation #1 (cont.' d): soils, hydrology, vegetation, wildlife #2; V, 39-42 Native American values: Scoouva & Jonathan Alder V, 11-29 Euro-American values: James Kilbourne V,30-37 Grand design: Continental Congress, VMD, the grid V,43-64 (cont.' d) Jefferson & Hamilton Imperial and imperialistic motives for western exploration & expansion V,65The immigrant experience: John Muir's Old and New Worlds Y,3-174 (cont.

' d) Y, 175-281 Tumer's 'Frontier Thesis' and Powell's" Arid Lands Report" V, 116-136 The Battle for the Great Plains (58 min.video) Midterm 19"' century changes in environmental attitudes V, 137-151 147 Wilderness 'preservation' for pleasure seeking: V, 165-176 Yellowstone National Park Muir & Pinchot: Hetch Hetchy, then D, 1-181 Politics and environment: Hetch Hetehy, now D,182-325 Wild by Law (58 min.video) Carson's 'web of life' Litigating Leopold's land ethic: NEPA & EIS, Sierra v.Morton V,207-235 The dance of legislation: strip mine regulation V,236-245 Alternate views: science v.'non-rational' ways of knowing V,247-251 China, by comparison Defining the suburban style V,253-313 A conceptual model of city form V,314-339 Columbus (sub)urban growth #3 (Cont.

bus ride Memorial Day, No Classes Post WW-Il auto-oriented hOUSing and commercial landscapes The 3-Ds of urbanity: density, diverSity, detail V,341-3 Final Exam in Knowlton #250, 9:30 AM -11:18 AM 11 GENERAL RECITATION CALENDAR (each TA may make some adjustments) 3/25 T 3/27 R 4/1 T landscape 4/3 R 4/8 T 4/10 R 4/15 T 4/17 R 4/22 T 4/24 R 4/29 T 5/1 R 5/6 T 5/8 R drafts 5/13 T Sq.5/15 R 5/20 T stories 5/22 R 5/27 T 5/29 R Paradise defined: an in-class discussion; homework: read assigned stories Assign issue paper; form discussion circles and discuss characteristics of effective class participation; discuss characteristics of good descriptive and analytical writing using the assigned readings as guides to examine different approaches, points of view, types of content, styles of evidence / argument, and narrative styles; homework: walk the Olentangy bikepilth between King Ave.and Olentangy Village (just north of the Olentangy Wetlands) and read assigned stories Library research methods and Writing Center; homework: read assigned stories on issues 148 Continue discussion of effective writing, including types with short preparation times such as the in-class assignments and exams, using the assigned readings as guides; discuss issue paper topics and characteristics, and discuss the Olentangy bikepath walk; homework: read assigned stories on landscape issues Issue Paper draft due; In-class writing exercise #1: response to bikepath walk; homework: exchange drafts and write constructive comments Discuss strengths and weaknesses of draft papers in discussion circles, relate papers to the assigned readings; homework: read assigned stories on landscape issues In-class writing exercise #2: exam-like question midterm review Continue work on paper and discussion of effective writing style Issue paper due Assign landscape analysis paper; discuss the characteristics of effeclive expository writing; homework: read assigned stories Discuss topics and characteristics of analysis papers; relate to readings In~class writing exercise #3; homework: read assigned stories Analysis draft due; plan debate on contemporary urban form define and discuss stewardship, especially as related to urban and suburban life; homework: exchange and write constructive comments Discuss strengths and weaknesses of draft papers in discussion circles; relate papers to the assigned readings; homework: ride High St.to Worthington (this takes about 3 hours) Continue work on landscape analysis paper; homework: read assigned stories In-class writing exercise #4: the meaning of contemporary urban form: analysis and interpretation of something seen on the transect of the city; homework: read assigned Analysis due; Continue preparations for debate: organize sides and arguments; homework: background reading on the urban form issue to be debate Debate: meaning of contemporary urban form Final exam review 12 Course Syllabus 00 THE ()HI() STATE UNIVERSITY .E NATURAL RESOURCES POLICY ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES 400 5 credit hours, Spring Quarter 2008 Instructor Prof.email protected ,e<;iV 316B Kottman Hall 688-8166 Office hours by appointment TAs: Jason Thomas: .

J~ q q Course Outline (this is a working copy capable of change) 149 UNIT 1: THE CONTEXT OF NATURAL RESOURCES POLICY March 24: Welcome Overview, course requirements, introductions; value clash March 26: Attitudes about the environment Read: Smith Chapter 2 part (pp.7-20)) Read: McPhee excerpts March 27 (Recitation 1): Scarcity v.Plenty and your Ecological Footprint Read: Ehrlich v.Simon, "Betting the planet" Quiz March 31: Public opinion and the media; issue framing Read: Smith Chapter 2 part (pp.5-15) Read: excerpt from "The Oeath of Environmentalism" April 2: Regulations, risk analysis', and debates about the role of government Read: Smith Chapter 3, pp.100-116 *Order the Harvard case online April 3 (Recitation 2): Media Framing of Climate Change Read: "Global Warming is a Hoax" Bring in: i-page paper discussing how the story illustrates course concepts April 7: Aresnic in Drinking Water case Read: Harvard case - order online UNIT 2: PUBLIC POLICY TOOLS AND PROCESSES April9: Policy tools Read: Fiorino pp.167-187 Special Guest: Dan Fiorino, USEPA April 10 (Recitation 3): National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Read: NEPA article - Shaw pp.112-118 and 107-112 Quiz rrenticourses/SP08/ Page 1 of3 4/2512008 Course Syllabus April 14: Models of the policy process Read: Kraft ch 3, pp.

15-18 UNIT 3: GOVERNMENT LEVELS AND INSTITUTIONS April 16: The Federal Level Read: Kraft ch 3, pp.491-498 "Notify TA of your intended Application Activity choice by today *Notify TA of your intended Current Issue topic by today April 17 (Recitation 4): Know your federal government Bring in: homework assignment April 21: Federal Environmental Laws of the 1970s Read: Layzer ch 2 part, pp.26-40) Read: additional TBD April23: Federal Air and Water Laws Read: Layzer ch 2 part, pp.

41-49 Read: additional TBD April 24 (Recitation 5): Review session Bring in: questions for the TAs April 28: Midterm Exam April30: State Level Read: Kraft ch 3, pp.80-81 Read: Lester, "Federalism and State Environmental Policy" May 1 (Recitation 6): Know your state and local government Bring in: homework assignment May 5: Agencies Read: TBD * Tum in Application Activity May 7: Courts Read: Lunch paper on juridical democracy I citizen suits Read: additional TBD Special guest: David Scott, Ohio Sierra Club May 8 (Recitation 7): Reading TBD 150 Quiz May 12: Science into Policy Read: "How to Lose Your Political Virginity While Keeping Your Scientific Credibility."Political Science," Page 2 of3 Read: Steel, Brent, Peter List, Denise Lach, and Bruce Shindler."The Role of Scientists in the Environmental Policy Process: A Case Study from the American West." May 14: Local Government: Land use and sprawl Read: Layzer ch.17 May 15 (Recitation 8): Student presentations *Turn in Current Issue Paper UNIT 4: POLICY FUTURES May 19: Agricultural policy Read: Chertow and Esty (eds) ch.6 Read: Skolnikoff, The Role of Science in policy: The Climate Change Debate in the U.

" May 26: Holiday (no class) May 28: New policy tools Read: TBD Read: TBD May 29 (Recitation 10): Review session Finals Week (Tues" June 3, 9:30 to 11:18 am): Final Exam tQ.<;!g,§ to Spa8 course listiOg senr , ! current!courses/S P081 Page 3 of3 4/25/2008 Course Syllabus ~~ THE OHIO STATE UNIVER.l;ITY ~ SENR COURSE SYUAlillJS NATURAL RESOURCES POLICY ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES 400 5 credit hours, Spring Quarter 2008 Instructor Prof.Tomas Koontz tQ90J;:;,: email protected ,edq 316B Kottman Hall 688-8166 Office hours by appointment TAs: Jason Thomas: Jb,Qm.y' This is a working copy capable of change.Course Description Course Bulletin: "Conceptual and historic development, implementation, and evaluation of resource policy." Page 1 of3 In a broad sense, the term "natural resources" refers to the relationship between humans and the natural world.In this class, we w11l explore connections between ourselves and the environment, emphasizing how natura! resource and environmental poncies are conceptualized, crafted, analyzed, and implemented.

Along the way we will explore the historical and cultural context of pollcy, as well as the links between science and policy.151 To cover the large topic of natural resources policy in one quarter, we will indulge in learning about a variety of topics, rather than studying anyone topic in great detail.It is hoped that this wi!! provide opportunities to discover one or several subjects that will continue to be of interest outside of the classroom and long after the term is over.This is in keeping with the notion that natural resources issues are not confined to textbooks or newspaper articles; rather, they are an important part of our everyday habits, beliefs, and quality of life.In studying natural resources policy and issues, it quickly becomes clear that nobody has the "right" answer.

There are always at least two sides to every issue, and we should get in the habit of listening to, and learning from, others, especially those whose viewpoints differ from our own.With this in mind, the course will provide opportunities for students to voice opinions, make reasoned arguments, ask questions, and discuss topics both in the recitation sections and the full class sessions.Thus we will listen to each other in order to learn.Since this is a five-credit course, we will cover a lot of material in our time together.An extra challenge will be keeping on top of the work as the school year draws to a close, other classes get busier, and the weather gets nicer.

In order for us to get the most out of the course, it is essential for everyone to do the assigned work, which includes reading and thinking about material before we will discuss it.I am committed to doing the substantial work required for teaching this course; I expect that students who enroll in the course will do likewise.Course Objectives By the end of the quarter, students will understand key concepts in natural resources policy.They will have the skills necessary to listen carefully, communicate their thoughts to others, and make reasoned, informed decisions about natural resources issues.This course will foster a knowledge base and interest level to prepare students weI! for further study in natural resources policy, both in and beyond the classroom.

Course Requirements The Student: In order for the interactive learning environment to be successful, each student must accept responsibility for preparing for each class session by completing assigned readings and taking the time to reflect upon them.Assigned readings will be posted on the course Carmen website.Occasionally I may provide handouts for additional reading material.There is one reading item to purchase, the Harvard case study, as noted below.I will provide reading questions as a guide and to stimulate your thinking about what you read.

See the course calendar for due dates, with the caveat that I may change the order or dates; listen for any such announcements in class.Students are expected to thoughtfully participate in class discussions.Each student's contribution is helpful in increasing our understanding of topics.I expect that discussions will occur in an atmosphere of mutual respect, where everyone can feel comfortable expressing his or her views.To cultivate productive discussions we need to respect the rights of others to have opinions that differ from our own.

,eduicurrent/courses/SP08/ 4/25/2008 Course Syllabus Page 2 of 3 Most people learn best by going beyond just reading and discussing material.Applying concepts to real-world situations of the student's choosing provides an excellent opportunity to gain further command of course material.Thus, students wi!! complete a CUrrent Issue Paper plus select an Application Activity, discussed below, to earn points toward the final grade.Weekly recitation section quizzes or shortpJiI,PJi!1§>.

9B, provide additional opportunities to earn pOints toward the final grade.There will be one in-class midterm eX8JIti Lt;lliQQ, plus a final exam during finals week.These exams will consist primarily of multiple choice, and short essay questions designed to test understanding of the readings and class discussions.The Instructor: My role as instructor is to provide a structure for the course as well as a way to logically proceed through the diverse topics related to natural resources policy.

I will prepare lectures and lead discussions to help clarify topics and draw out main ideas, and I will help students fit together concepts from a variety of readings and from each other's experiences.Outside of class, I will be happy to meet with you for office hours, by appOintment.Feel free to contact me to set up a mutually agreeable time.Course Texts Most course readings and reading questions will be posted on the .152 Note: students will purchase a case study report by 8QrH 2 in preparation for the class session Monday, April 7 (see instructions for online purchase from Harvard's Kennedy Schoo! of Government).Grading Policies Course grades will be based on a student's point total.Points can be earned as follows: Item Maximum No.of Points Application Activity (notify 4/16; due 5/5) Current Issue Paper (notify 4/16; due 5/15) Recitation Quizzes/papers (Thursdays) Recitation Participation (Thursdays) Mid-term Exam (4/28) Final Exam (6/3) Total possible 50 50 60 50 100 100 410 Final grades will be assigned based on a student's point total.

Letter grades correspond to the following minimum point percentages: 8+ = 88% C+ = 78% D+ = 68% A=92% 8=82% C=72% D=62% A- = 90 % 8- = 80% C- = 70% D- = 60% APPLICATION ACTIVITIES Application Activities provide an opportunity to apply course concepts to each student's topic of interest.Unless otherwise indicated, each activity is an individual (not group) project, and it should be undertaken individually.Each student is expected to choose one application activity, which is worth up to 50 paints, and notify his or her TA of the choice no later than the start of class Tuesday, April 16.Due date is the start of class Monday, May 5.Late assignments will not be accepted without prior instructor approval, unless for a documented health or family emergency.

The activities are described at the end of this syllabus.CURRENT ISSUE PAPER The Current Issue Paper is designed to help you apply concepts learned in class to real-world natural resources issues.Each student must notify his or her TA of the choice of topic no later than the start of class Tuesday, April1S.Due date is the start of Recitation Thursday, May 15.Late assignments wi!! not be accepted without prior instructor approval, unless for a documented health or family emergency.

Details are provided at the end of this syllabus.RECITATION QUIZZES / PAPERS AND PARTICIPATION n a large class such as this, the opportunity to meet in smaller numbers is a crucial component of learning.The Thursday recitation sections provide a forum to discuss course material and additional readings in a smaller class setting.You may earn pOints from weekly recitation quizzes and assignments.In addition, graduate teaching assistants in charge of the recitation sections will assign each student with participation points based on contribution to the discussions and completion of recitation work.

While attendance is a necessary condition to participating, it is not sufficient.In other words, you are expected to attend and also to participate.EXAMS The mid-term and final exams will be equally weighted.In fairness to other students, and to the instructor, exams must be taken at the assigned time and date.However, in cases of dire emergencies (medical or family), we will work out an alternate arrangement if you notify me before the test is administered.

rrenticourses/SP08/ 412512008 Course Syllabus Page 3 of3 Availability of Accommodations If you need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability, you should contact me to arrange an appointment as soon as possible.At the appointment we can discuss the course format, anticipate your needs and explore potential accommodations.I rely on the Office For Disability Services for assistance in verifying the need for accommodations and developing accommodation strategies.If you have not previously contacted 153 the Office for Disability Services, I encourage you to do so.Method of Dealing with a Language Barrier This course will be conducted in English.

I do not have the resources necessary to evaluate non-English work.Students who have difficulty communicating in English are encouraged to seek assistance from sources outside the classroom.A Note on Academic Dishonesty: In the university setting, academic dishonesty is one of the most serious offenses a student can commit.Often the student isn't aware of exactly what constitutes academic dishonesty.In addition to consulting the procedures created by the OSU Committee on Academic Misconduct, I offer some basic guidelines: 1.

Cheating on an exam: Unless specifically allowed by the instructor, you may not look at someone else's work, allow someone else to look at your work, or refer to notes or other materials during the exam.Plagiarism: You should be aware of what constitutes plagiarism, because it can have serious consequences.Plagiarism means using someone else's ideas, or their words (even in a short phrase) without indicating where you got them.

If you use someone else's idea, in your own words, you must include a citation to indicate where you got the idea.

If you use someone else's words, you must put quotes around them and include a citation to indicate where they came from.Plagiarism includes copying another student's paper or ideas.hitp:// rrentlcourses/SP08/ 4/25/2008 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOSCIENCE (AQ 2008) 154 Earth Sciences 203 INSTRUCTOR OFFICE HRS Lecture: 9:30 - 11:18, T & R Dr.Garry McKenzie R 1 -2 pm Orton Hall 110 305 Mendenhall Lab or by appoint.Lab: M, as assigned (8:30; 10:30; 2:30) email protected 292-0655 Mendenhall Lab 252 THE GEC AND EARTH SCI 203 The GEC Expected Learning Outcomes (ELOs) for a GEC Earth Science course are those for the Natural Sciences, which are: 1.

Students understand the basic facts, principles, theories and methods of modern science.Students learn key events in the history of science.Students provide examples of the inter-dependence of scientific and technological developments.

Students discuss social and philosophical implications of scientific discoveries and understand the potential of science and technology to address problems of the contemporary world.Earth Sciences GEC courses fulfill “GEC Category 2.” The “GEC Learning Goals and Objectives” for this and other Earth Sciences GEC courses are those for the Natural Sciences courses, as follows: “Natural Science coursework fosters students’ understanding of the principles, theories, and methods of modern science, the relationship between science and technology, the implications of scientific discoveries and the potential of science and technology to address problems of the contemporary world.” SPECIFIC COURSE OBJECTIVES for Earth Sci 203 are provided below, and along with the schedule and additional course information on the syllabus, explain how this course will satisfy the GEC Learning Goals and ELOs.Completion of this course will enable the student to: 1) Understand some of the basic principles and facts of geoscience and the Earth system, and how and when we obtained this knowledge about Earth, 2) appreciate the relationship between science, technology and society, including the social and philosophical implications of our scientific understandings, 3) improve understanding of the role of humans in the Earth system, 4) evaluate the nature and importance of natural hazards and their impact on the human colony, 5) understand the geological and other resources that are part of our life-support system (“civilization exists by geologic consent”), 6) participate in group interaction and problem solving related to hazards, resources, land-use planning, environmental pollution, global change, human population growth, forecasting the future, and sustainability 7) assess global problems, engage in critical thinking about their potential solution, and construct reasonable scenarios about the future (50 years hence), and 8) make informed decisions about one’s role on, and choices for, Spaceship Earth.Although we expect you to meet these objectives and pass the course by providing the correct answers and learning the skills needed in environmental geoscience, we do not guarantee that by so doing, you will, in the long run, appropriately manage yourself (and sometimes others) for a successful voyage on Spaceship Earth.That is, even by passing this course, you could eventually fail “Spaceship Earth”.

We also realize that your time is limited and your objectives might differ from ours.We know at the least you seek some understanding of the subject, a passing grade and completion of a 5-credit-hr science course – usually in the shortest time, with the least effort and minimal study.Of course, we hope that most of you will be interested enough in your future and the future of the Earth to go beyond the this level of understanding and performance.R 23 H2O Resources; Aral Sea, Groundwater 10, p.8 Read: III-1** groundwater T 8 (Keller, Text)* al.

) T Nov 4 Solid Waste; Environmental Health 12, 13 Read: III-4 health Class Activity (Foley et al.Manual) (Foley et R Sep 25 Overview; Some Concepts, ESS Preface, 1 Read: I-1,2,3 contours &/or Earth system T 4, 5 30 Natural Hazards; Floods Read: II-9 floods V R T T 11 “VETS DAY” Optional Field Trip – Ice Core Lab, Scott Hall, West Campus 20 min, between 2:00 -4:00pm -- T 18 Mineral Resources and Environ 14 Read IV-Intro classif.+El OneV 7 Global Change + Earth System 16 Read: VI-2, I-1 glob chg O3 9 Earthquakes; Engineer’s Soil 3, 7 Read: II-3, 4 EQ prep T 14 Landslides; 2, 3, 6 Read: II-6 6 Energy Resources, Peak Oil, Solar;Hubbert Read: IV-1** 13 MIDTERM II ----------------------- + p 39-42 R R 15 R R Oct 2 Floods, Subsidence 5, 6 Read: II-8 Subsid quiz? T volc hazards V R 30 Water Quality, Liquid Waste; Pollution 11, 12 Read: III-2 water quality CLASS SCHEDULE & COURSE DESCRIPTION AQ 2008 McKenzie Date Topic Readings before Class 28 Volcanic Hazards Read:II-1, 2 Erosion Ohio slides R 20 Regional Planning, EIS, Conflicts; Law 1, 18, 3* Read: V-Intro region plan.EoSV T 25 Futurism, Long Range Plan, Collapse? Jared Diamond Read: IV +VI Intros AfterWarmingV R class 27 Thanksgiving Holiday – no Read up on futurism and plan for your scenario 16 MIDTERM I ---------------------------21 Coastal Hazards; Exam Review 9, p.

504-7 Read:II-10** coasts T Dec 2 Path to Sustainability; Plan B 3.0? 16, 15, 1 Read VI-3 Discuss Collapse R 4 Discussion of Future, Growth? + others Read VI-0; VI-1 Discuss Pos Future 156 1 R Dec 11 FINAL EXAM 9:30 - 11:18 A.OR 110 COMPREHENSIVE * Read parts of Chapter on topic; ** Read the Introduction to this section in manual.Course Description (from Course Bulletin) Earth Sciences 203 - Concepts and challenges of geological hazards and resources, environmental pollution and health, regional and long-range planning, and global change and sustainability.

(= Geological Sciences 203) EXERCISE BOOK, TEXTBOOK AND OTHER SOURCES Textbook:Keller, E., 2000, Environmental Geology, (8thEd): Upper Saddle River, NJ, Prentice Hall, 562 p., 1999, Investigations in Environmental Geology (2ndEd), Prentice-Hall 303 p.Books available from local book stores and on line.See also a single copy of each on reserve in Orton Geological Library.NOTE: library fines for late returns are significant.

If used, replace missing or marked pages before the assigned lab.LABORATORY: Your Teaching Assistant (TA) will provide additional information.The lab and class exercises are important parts of this course.You must attend your assigned laboratory and work on the problems during lab for maximum credit.Discuss the questions with others but write your own answers in own words.Used lab manuals with answers from previous quarters 157 found in lab will be confiscated.If you purchased a used lab manual check for missing pages– it will be your responsibility to have completed exercises that are assigned.SO IF you BOUGHT a used manual and find missing pages, arrange to correct the situation.You should complete work during the lab period; if not, labs are due Friday by 1:00 pm in the big red lab box in ML 274 (or other arrangement according to your TA).

Read the intros to the topics for the labs before coming to lab and complete any assigned homework for lab or lecture before the due date.Maximum points for late labs will be reduced by: 25% after due date; 50% after beginning of next lab period.No credit for labs submitted > 2 weeks after the original lab date; see your lab partners for info and answers on such labs.Parts of some class exercises will be done and due in the second half of lecture so bring your exercise book (Foley et al.Lab Exam = 10% of your lab grade; Scenario Assignment will count as one lab and must be done.Know the material covered by doing the work and understanding the concepts/processes.There will be an optional field trip on Tuesday, Nov.Labs AQ 2008 are on Monday LAB# Date of LAB Readings(before lab) TOPICS OF EXERCISES (TO BE DONE IN LAB)* 1 Sep 29 I-1, 2, 3 Rocks, Earth System, Maps and Conversions 2 Oct 6 II-9 Floods 3 Oct 13 II-8 Subsidence 4 Oct 20 II-6 Landslides 5 Oct 27 II-10 Coastal Hazards 6 Nov 3 III-1, 2, 3 Water Quality; Lake pollution 7 Nov 10 III-5 Waste Disposal from Oil Extraction Optional Nov 11 VI-2 20-min Field Trip: Ice Core Lab between 2:00 - 4:00pm 8 Nov 17 VI-2 Global Change 9 Nov 24 III-6 Water Resources 10 Dec 1 VI-1; V-2 LAB Exam + part Regional Planning Lab + Overview of scenario lab and the take home assignment, a scenario, due at end of last lecture class.*Actual questions and exercises to be completed will be assigned during the lab period and new questions may be added to each lab.Participation in the lab -- not only completion of the exercise -- will be a factor in your grade.Discuss the questions with others but write your own answers in your own words.

I expect to see you there each day; however, I realize that at times you might need to be away.Check with someone who was there to get information and assignments.Exams will cover lecture, lab, and reading materials.We do not give grades; students earn their grades.

No grades or other student information will be given over the phone.TEST PROCEDURES, MISCONDUCT, & ODS: Examinations will be in lecture hall or additional rooms if needed.Exams will be multiple choice, with short answer and matching questions; one to two hours in length.Bring your ID card, several sharpened # 2 pencils, and a calculator to each exam.Pencils and calculators are not provided.

Cell phones will be turned off and packed away.Final grades are based on a curve, computed after all the exams and labs have been given for the course.We provide the distribution of scores on each exam after they are returned in class.Exams are based on materials from text, lab exercises, and lectures, which will include discussions of current events related to the content of the course.Cheating will be reported as Academic Misconduct.

Make-up exams given at our discretion for real sickness, etc.They may be essay format or multiple choice, and may include an oral examination component.They must be completed within a week of the exam.A missed final exam may result in a grade of incomplete (I) with possibility of a make-up exam next Quarter.It is not acceptable to miss a test or be late for parking problems, alarms that failed, etc.This Lab Materials: You must use a sharp pencil on the graphs and diagrams and most of the questions in the lab.You will need a calculator, eraser, small triangle, and a ruler.You may work in groups (which you can change), but you must complete your very own work.

You are encouraged to read over the listed topic; however, you should not complete the exercise before coming to class and lab.

Lab Sections: # LABS Day TIME LOCATION Your TA mail office Hrs .1 17820-4 2 17821-0 3 17822-5 M 8:30 - 10:18 M 10:30 - 12:18 M 2:30 - 4:18 e- ML 252 ML 252.ML 252 158 activity that tends to compromise the academic integrity of the university, or subvert the educational process." Examples of academic misconduct include (but are not limited to) plagiarism, collusion (unauthorized collaboration), copying the work of another student, and possession of unauthorized materials during an examination.Ignorance of the University's Code of Student Conduct is never considered an "excuse" for academic misconduct, so I recommend that you review the Code of Student Conduct and, specifically, the sections dealing with academic misconduct.

If I suspect that a student has committed academic misconduct in this course, I am obligated by University Rules to report my suspicions to the Committee on Academic Misconduct.If COAM determines that you have violated the University's Code of Student Conduct (i., committed academic misconduct), the sanctions for the misconduct could include suspension or dismissal from the University and a failing grade in this course.Other sources of information on academic misconduct (integrity) include COAM's web page /coam/ and "Eight Cardinal Rules of Academic Integrity" /uacc/ is a 200-level course, but it is taught by regular faculty and students are primarily juniors and seniors.

We expect mature students in this course.See us if you have questions or if you need assistance.Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 2923307, TDD 292-0901; / NOTES AND REFERENCE MATERIALS, ETC.

: The Orton Memorial Library of Geology WEB site is /sites/geology/ and is a great resource.Additional class and lab materials may be on reserve only in Orton Library.Not all materials covered or handed out in class will be on Carmen.Academic Misconduct, any activity that tends to compromise academic integrity or subvert the educational process, will not be tolerated.

See the Student Resource Guide for policy information.Academic integrity is essential to maintaining an environment that fosters excellence in teaching, research, and other educational and scholarly activities.Thus, The Ohio State University and the Committee on Academic Misconduct (COAM) expect that all students have read and understand the University's Code of Student Conduct, and that all students will complete all academic and scholarly assignments with fairness and honesty.Students must recognize that failure to follow the rules and guidelines established in the University's Code of Student Conduct and this syllabus may constitute "Academic Misconduct." The Ohio State University's Code of Student Conduct (Section 3335-2304) defines academic misconduct as: "Any ADDITIONAL REFERENCES (SOME ON RESERVE) IN ORTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY: Brown, L.

, 2004, State Of the World 2004 NY, Norton (see any year) Brown, L.0: Rescuing a Planet under Stress and a Civilization in Trouble, Earth Policy Institute WW 159 Norton & Co /Books/Seg/ Brown, L.Earth Policy Institute, WW Norton & Co, 398p Gore, Al, 1992, Earth in the Balance, N.Hardin, G, 1993, Living Within Limits: NY, Oxford Univ.Press, 339 p Harris, Michael, Lament for an Ocean: The Collapse of the Atlantic Cod Fishery.

, 1975, Man and His Physical Environment, Readings in Environmental Geology, 2nd ed., & Menking, K, 1998, Environmental Geology: An Earth Systems Approach, NY, Freeman, 452 p.Montgomery, Carla, 2003, Environmental Geology, 6th ed.

Moore, P, Chaloner, B, and Stott, P, 1996, Global Environmental Change, Cambridge, Blackwell, 244p.Phelps, 1995, The State of Humanity, Cambridge, Blackwell.Utgard, McKenzie, and Foley, 1978, Geology in the Urban Environment, Minneapolis, Burgess, 355 p.UCAR/NOAA, 1997, Reports to the Nation —Our Changing Climate (Fall 1997, no.4) Solid Waste Authority of Central Ohio / Lester Brown’s Earth Policy Institute ­ / Kunstler’s The Long Emergency Reviewed by Rolling Stone /news/story/7203633/the long emergency Union of Concerned Scientists BBC News Prerequisites: Earth Sciences 100 or 105 or 121.

If you don’t have one of these or the equivalent, see the instructor after the first class for possible permission.This class is based on understandings and techniques of these earlier courses and students without the prerequisite struggle to do well.The pace is fast and we expect you to do the assigned readings, exercises and preparation for examinations.Additional Comments: This syllabus is a guide to the topics covered; changes in topics and dates might be required and if so will be announced in class.You are expected to make the scheduled exams; see me in the first week if you have a legitimate problem with the schedule.

Make friends with someone in the class from whom you can obtain information on what was covered in class in case you were away because of illness.Some students find it helpful to form a study team of 4 students, sit together in class and use e-mail for outside interaction.It is your responsibility to know what was covered and assigned.If you need help, seek it early in the Quarter.Don’t be so “cool” or so careless as to cut class or lab.

Regular attendance and participation will be factors in your grade / successful completion of the Aral Sea and water resources /~frank/gs203/ OSU Libraries / SIGMA XI Web Resources /resources/link s/ American Petroleum Institute / Energy Information Administration / 160 course.Credit is earned for the 10% component for class discussions (written responses), quizzes, and activities distribution of water resources, the ways in which these resources can be exploited and/or contaminated, and (2) to give students an appreciation for the need of scientific theory and scientific methods of investigation and analysis.Course Grades The course will be graded according to results from examinations, assignments, and class participation, as follows: (1) Two midterm exams 20%, 20% (2) Final exam 30% (3) Assignments and projects 25% (4) Class participation 5% The table below shows letter grades and associated percentages.SEI and other evaluation forms will be available at the end of the Quarter or at the Final Exam.Suggestions for improving the course are welcome during the quarter and we will provide a formal opportunity for comments for mid-course corrections (“Start, Stop, Continue”).

Exploring Water Issues (EARTHSCI 204) Grade Percent A 93 - 100 A- 90 - 92 B+ 87 - 89 B 83 - 86 B- 80 - 82 C+ 77 - 79 C 73 - 76 C- 70 - 72 D+ 67 - 69 D 60 - 66 E 59 and below Dr.Motomu Ibaraki 229 Mendenhall Lab email protected (292-7528) Description Introduction to issues affecting the world's fresh water supply with an emphasis on water use, conflict and sustainability.Meeting Times M T 0230P-0418 ML 0115 W 0230P-0318 ML 0115 Prerequisite Earth Sci 100, 105, 121; or Chem 101; or permission of instructor Office hours MTW 1030A-1118 RF 1118A-1218 ML 0229 or by appointment (e-mail: email protected ) Course Objectives The objectives of this course are: (1) to introduce the concepts controlling the movement of surface water and ground water, the Policies on Attendance and Absences Attendance is required at all lecture sessions.The instructor should be notified as soon as possible in emergency situations where students must miss class.The deadline for make-up work for missed assignments, quizzes or examinations is one (1) week from the original date of administration.

Each student must meet individually with the instructor or GTA regarding make-up work for missed 161 assignments.Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue (telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901, ( /).Academic Misconduct The Ohio State University and the Committee on Academic Misconduct (COAM) expect that all students will complete all academic and scholarly assignments with fairness and honesty.Failure to follow the rules and guidelines established in the University’s Code of Student Conduct and this syllabus may constitute “Academic Misconduct”.

The Ohio State University’s Code of Student Conduct (Section 333523-04) defines academic misconduct as: “Any activity that tends to compromise the academic integrity of the University, or subvert the educational process”.Examples of academic misconduct include (but are not limited to) plagiarism, collusion (unauthorized collaboration), copying the work of another student, and possession of unauthorized materials during an examination.All suspected cases of academic misconduct will be reported to the University Committee on Academic Misconduct.If academic misconduct has been committed, possible sanctions could include a failing grade in this course and suspension or dismissal from the University.Topical Outline The following is a tentative, chronological outline of course lecture and associated group or individual project and exercise topics: - Crisis in the World Water Supply - Fresh water supply in the world - Population growth and water supply - Rising demand of water in agriculture, industry, and the homes - Decline of the Aral Sea in Kazakhstan - Lake Winnipeg in Canada - Re-Shaping the Natural World - Floods - Flood insurance and flood frequency - Dispute between local business in Grandview Height, Columbus and FEMA - the flood caused by the hurricane Katrina - Diverting the flow for cities, industry, and agriculture - Los Angeles Aqueduct - Colorado River and Central Arizona Project (CAP) - Debates between states, Mexico and native Americans - Groundwater mining - the Ogallala aquifer depletion in Kansas - Mexico city water supply - Water Health - The largest mass poisoning in the wold history Arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh - Organic solvent contamination in Woburn, Massachusetts – Movie “Civil Action” 162 GS210 ­­ ENERGY AND MINERAL RESOURCES IN SOCIETY - Coliform contamination in drinking water wells in Woster, Ohio - Nuclear waste management in Yucca Mountain and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Water Usage, Abuses and Management - Water for food - Daily water usage and minimum amount of water needed to produce food - Irrigation - Unsustainable agribusiness and Grandprairie Demonstration Project in Arkansas - Water for industry - China's Three Goges Dam Project - The water business - Water Conflicts - Scare water resources and increasing political tensions - Weapon of war Reference Cech, T.

Principles of Water Resources: History, Development, Management, and Policy, Wiley Text Books, p480.Elements of Physical Hydrology: Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland, 314 p.Pride 317 ML email protected DATE TOPIC LECTURE READINGS # Jan 3 (R) Introduction, classification of resources 1-44 4 World & U.production and consumption 60-76 7 No Class 8 Energy resources, fossil fuels 125138 9 Coal types, occurrence 138-152 10 EXERCISE 11 extraction, Quiz #1 COAL Coal 144- 151 14 Petroleum – occurrence, traps 153-176 163 15 Petroleum continued 16 Natural gas, coal gasification Feb 1 Water continued, Quiz #4 4 Metals and mineralizing processes 239246 5 Mineral claims, leases 176-182 17 Oil shale, tar sand 18 for oil & gas, Quiz #2 21 22 energy 23 183-188 Exploration 6 Iron and iron mining MLK Day Nuclear 246-261 7 MINING EXERCISE 190-210 Solar energy 210- 8 Aluminum occurrences and processing, Quiz #5 264-271 215 24 PETROLEUM EXERCISE 25 Hydroelectric power, Quiz #3 217219, 228 11 The odd occurrences of nickel 291-293 12 Molybdenum and copper 293-295, 298-307 13 Lead and zinc 28 Tidal and wind energy 219-226 29 307-310 Geothermal energy 30 resources 31 and water resources Feb 14 silver 226-231 World water 401-437 Groundwater Gold & 312-322 15 continued, Quiz #6 437-453 164 Gold & silver 4 chemicals minerals 18 5 and near disaster Chromium & platinum group metals 285289, 322-325 3486 on asbestos 22 Mar 10 (M) FINAL EXAMINATION (11:30 - 1:18 a.) CAMPUS Building materials, Quiz #7 ************ ************ *********** 25 Building materials continued, dimension stone # Dimension stone continued 27 Mineral collecting for beauty and profit (Sandy Ludlum) 28 Gems and precious stones (Sandy Ludlum) 394-399 Mar 3 Textbook Craig, J., 2001, Resources of the Earth Origin, Use, and Environmental Impact, 3rd Edition.26 29 381-386 Resources for 486-496 362-381 Feb The skinny 7 the future, Quiz #9 Industrial rocks & minerals 21 FIELD TRIP 331-361 Sulfur, salt, 355 19 Exploration for metallic deposits 20 Fertilizers, The following site contains materials that will be used throughout the quarter: y./dp210 Kimberlite and diamonds, Quiz #8 388-392 ************ ************ *********** Kimberlite and diamonds continued 165 Course Grading Quizzes (8 of 9 @ 5%) 40 % RF 1118A-1218 ML 0229 or by appointment (e-mail: email protected ) Required Text/Reading List This is an extremely current subject.Consequently, a textbook is not required for the class; literature readings and website information will be provided or placed on reserve in Orton Library.Content This course will provide a broad introduction to the critical issues relating to the world’s freshwater resources.A wide range of freshwater resource issues and water policy topics will be presented in a combination lecture and interactive seminar, group or individual project, and exercise format.

Current and past scientific and popular literature articles and website information focusing on a particular water issue will be assigned each week for class review and discussion.Students will develop an awareness and fundamental understanding of the interrelations between freshwater resources and past, present, and projected environmental, socioeconomic, and political conditions.Following an introduction to basic principles and concepts of the hydrological cycle, subsequent lectures will address a range of problems from drought and climate change to competition for and contamination of scarce freshwater supplies.Course Objectives Exercises (4 @ 10%) 40 % Final Examination 20 % ************ ********** Water Security for the 21st Century (Earth Sci 411) call number: 17432-4 Dr.Motomu Ibaraki 229 Mendenhall Lab email protected (292-7528) Description Examines the major issues that are contributing to the decline in quantity and quality of global freshwater resources and the resultant environmental and societal impacts.

Meeting Times M T 0230P-0418 ML 0115 W 0230P-0318 ML 0115 Prerequisite GEC data analysis course; sophomore standing and above Office hours MTW 1030A-1118 166 The overall objective of this course is to introduce students to and foster discussion on the many scientific and political facets of the world’s leading freshwater issues.Additionally, upon successful completion of the course, students will have developed an understanding of fundamental climatological and hydrological principles.Course Grades The course will be graded according to results from examinations, exercises, and class participation, as follows: (1) Midterm exam 30% (2) Final exam 35% (3) Assignments and projects 35% The table below shows letter grades and associated percentages.Policies on Attendance and Absences Attendance is required at all lecture sessions.The instructor should be notified as soon as possible in emergency situations where students must miss class.

The deadline for make-up work for missed assignments, quizzes or examinations is one (1) week from the original date of administration.Each student must meet individually with the instructor regarding make-up work for missed assignments.Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue (telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901, ( /).Academic Misconduct The Ohio State University and the Committee on Academic Misconduct (COAM) expect that all students will complete all academic and scholarly assignments with fairness and honesty.

Failure to follow the rules and guidelines established in the University’s Code of Student Conduct and this syllabus may constitute “Academic Misconduct”.The Ohio State University’s Code of Student Conduct (Section 333523-04) defines academic misconduct as: “Any activity that tends to compromise the academic integrity of the University, or subvert the educational process”.Examples of academic misconduct include (but are not limited to) plagiarism, collusion (unauthorized collaboration), copying the work of another student, and possession of unauthorized materials during an examination.All suspected cases of academic misconduct will be reported to the University Committee on Academic Misconduct.

If academic misconduct has been committed, possible sanctions could include a failing grade in this course and suspension or dismissal from the University.

Topical Outline The following is a tentative, chronological outline of course lecture and associated group or individual project and exercise topics: 167 1.Course overview (Weeks 1-3) ● Introduction to principles and concepts of the hydrological cycle ● Concepts and case studies in water balance ● Principles of ground water and surface water hydrology ● Hydrological basins and watersheds ● Global distribution of freshwater resources and demographics ● River diversions – China’s water problems ● Draining wetlands ● Groundwater mining – Case study of the High Plains Aquifer ● Urbanization 5.Water uses and abuses (Week 7) ● Irrigation & agricultural pollution – Mississippi River and Gulf of Mexico hypoxia; Chesapeake Bay ● Industry & industrial pollution – Hudson River and PCBs 6.Water and Health (Week 8) ● Drinking water supply and sanitation: historical and global perspective ● Water-borne pathogens – Bacterial: Recent cholera outbreaks in South & Central America; typhoid fever, E.coli – Protozoan: Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium – Viral: Hepatitis A, poliomyelitis ● Water and vector-borne diseases – Mosquito: malaria, yellow and dengue fevers, and West Nile virus – Snail: Schistosomiasis or snail fever ● Chemical contaminants in drinking water – Synthetic organic pollutants: THMs, chloroform, benzene – Arsenic (Bangladesh water well issues) – Lead, nitrates 7.

Water Conflicts – Hydroterrorism (Week 9) ● Destruction of marsh wetlands of southern Iraq 8.Solutions for sustainable freshwater resources (Week 10) ● Conservation and reuse ● Rational water pricing ● Integrated water resources management Grade Percent A 93 - 100 A- 90 - 92 B+ 87 - 89 B 83 - 86 B- 80 - 82 C+ 77 - 79 C 73 - 76 C- 70 - 72 D+ 67 - 69 D 60 - 66 E 59 and below ● Virtual water budget 2.Introduction to climatic influences on the hydrologic cycle (Week 4) ● Greenhouse gases, melting of polar ice caps and glaciers, rising sea levels ● ENSO, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, SST ● Droughts and floods in the Colorado River Basin; climatic connections 3.Competition over water resources (Week 5) ● Jordan River (Israel, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan) ● Nile River (Ethiopia, Sudan, Egypt) ● Colorado River (western states, USA, Mexico) ● GAP project (Turkey, Syria, and Iraq competition for TigrisEuphrates) 4.Reshaping the hydrosphere (Week 6) 168 occurrence, exploration, production and use of fossil fuels, the significant role that petroleum plays in transportation, the organization of cities, and many other aspects of society from food production to home heating.

The course also explores the evolving connection between global warming and energy options and the relationship between number of humans and consumption of energy and other geologic resources.In addition to covering the basics of the geological sciences as they relate to energy systems, quality of life, and sustainability, we briefly explore the social, economic, and moral issues that must be addressed if sustainability is to be achieved, given our present dependency on fossil fuels as the primary energy resource in most societies.The development of the petroleum industry, evolving estimates of the recoverable conventional petroleum resource, options for other fossil fuels, and geologic resources needed for expanding alternate energy and renewable energy are part of the base used to identify and develop energy options for sustainable societies.● Water as a commodity - trading water rights ● Population control ● Desalination Earth Sciences 425 WQ (others possible) PEAK OIL and SUSTAINABILITY (5 Credit Hours) (Call #s ) Description: An examination of the problem of decreasing supplies of fossil fuels, alternative energy sources, and possible accommodations.Meeting Days, Times and locations: Lecture: MT 9:3011:18 Mendenhall Lab 252 Recitation: R 9:3010:18 Mendenhall Lab 252 R 10:3011:18 Mendenhall Lab 252 (one recitation time will be used, unless enrollment requires two or more) Instructor: Dr.

, School of Earth Sciences, ML 305, The Ohio State University (292-0655; email protected ).Office Hours: TBD Rationale: From a geological perspective the pending shortage of fossil fuels, and most notably the decreased production of crude oil, are of particular urgency.The general range of predictions for the peak in world oil production is 2005 to 2030.

How sharp will the peak be? What will it mean for humans and all of our human systems? Many books and digital publications, community groups, and several videos have explored the issue of when Peak Oil production will occur and more importantly what impact it will have and what we should do to prepare for this period and beyond.We will review, evaluate and discuss materials from this rapidly evolving body of Prerequisites: GEC Data Analysis Course; Sophomore standing and above Course Content and Objective: The focus is on examination of the problem of decreasing supplies of fossil fuel, alternative energy options and possible accommodations.A key objective of this course is to foster a broader, more comprehensive understanding of the global impacts of our present and projected fossil fuel consumption.Students will develop an understanding of the origin, 169 information related to the significance of this phenomenon and the options for societies in North America and globally.T 9 Origin, occurrence, exploration, and types of petroleum; Seven Sisters and The Prize by Daniel Yergin R 11 The Geology of Petroleum (Hands-on exploration of geologic materials, geology and topo maps; cross sections of oil fields; drilling techniques and oil production) Lecture periods will be used for faculty and student presentations, guest lecturers, discussions of the assigned materials, review of latest news items, and activities to further understanding of geology and geologic aspects of energy resources.

Week 3 M Jan 15 NO CLASS MLK day T Jan 16 Conflicting assessments of ultimate recovery of petroleum and the peak in petroleum: ASPO and CERA, and others.The energy mix for the world and USA; oil uses and importance in transportation.R Jan 18 Exploring the data on global energy use and What is a Watt? Recitation sessions will include deeper exploration of problematic items, review of the basic geologic, energy and sustainability concepts and techniques, group assignments, and preparation of individual reports concerning energy resources and sustainability.Week 4 M Jan 22 Coal – A large quantity of carbon with only two problems T Jan 23 The role of oil sand and oil shale R Jan 25 Evidence for global warming (review of data and on-line assignment); possible Field Trip Week 5 M Jan 29 Global climate change and plans to keep carbon in check (sequestration, etc) T Jan 30 How bad can it be? The End of Suburbia ; Crude Awakening, etc.R Feb 1 Midterm Field Trip(s) Depending on the size of the class and weekly schedules, we will have several options for field trips including the OSU power plant, energy and global change research centers, a coal mining region (where environmental problems have been significant), major university lectures, and community meetings of energy/environmental groups.

Schedule: Date Topic Week 6 Begin Student presentations and papers M Feb 5 Alternative energy options: solar and solar-derived T Feb 6 Alternative energy options: solar and solar-derived R Feb 8 Status of hydrogen for transportation, etc.Element One and beyond Week 1 R Jan 4 Introductions; overview, rationale and objectives of course; geological perspectives on natural resources and fossil fuels.Week 2 M Jan 8 Hubbert’s Peak and the US peak in oil production; mineral resources and Cornucopian Premises; history of oil use and exploration; Week 7 Student presentations and papers 170 M Feb 12 Alternative energy options: geothermal T Feb 13 Alternative energy options: nuclear R Feb 15 Investigating nuclear waste options Ohio Climate Road Map, Ohio Environmental Council, June 2006, 70 p.;( these can be placed on-line in Carmen) and 3) Brown, Lester, 2008, Plan B 3.0: Mobilizing to Save Civilization, Norton, New York, 398 p.

(parts available as updates on the web).Selected papers and sections from books will be placed on reserve, made available as part of course package, or be on-line in Carmen.Students will be expected to keep up with the daily news on the topics of energy and sustainability.Week 8 Student presentations and papers M Feb 19 Energy efficiency and conservation options.Who is Amory Lovins? T Feb 20 Ethanol and biodiesel options R Feb 22 Exploring exponential growth: Al Bartlett’s lecture and other approaches Grading: Based on group presentation and accompanying paper (10%), individual presentations (30), classroom/recitation/field trip participation/ discussion (10%), midterm exam (20 %), individual paper and presentation on pathways for future of society (20%), final exam --a onepage essay on assigned topic (10%).

Week 9 M Feb 26 Sustainability and sustainable development & Diamond’s options for societal collapse T Feb 27 Risk, resilience and sustainability R Mar 1 Growth, death from overpopulation, and the Tragedy of the Commons.Some examples from Living within Limits by Hardin Policies on Attendance and Absences: Attendance is expected at all sessions, but we recognize that shortages and high cost of energy, unusual weather events that disrupt transportation and impact attendance are possible.The instructor should be notified as soon as possible in emergency situations where students must miss class.The deadline for make-up work for missed assignments, quizzes or examinations is one (1) week from the original date of administration.Each student must meet individually with the instructor regarding makeup work for missed assignments.

In the event of major disruption of the system, we will consider opening an on-line component for the course.Week 10 M Mar 5 Pathways for the future of society; and 4-minute presentations T Mar 6 Pathways for the future of society; and 4-minute presentations R Mar 8 Develop Group Summary of Alternate Energy Futures (by class participants) Final Exam: Take Home -One page essay on related assigned topic.Book List: The textbook selected will depend on availability of the latest print and online publications in the energy and sustainability field.Three basic sources currently comprise the “Textbook”: 1) Energy Solutions for a Sustainable World (Energy’s Future Beyond Carbon), Scientific American, 2006, September, v.

; 2) Disability Services: 171 Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue (telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901, /).(larger font will be used with updated statement) Academic Misconduct: The Ohio State University and the Committee on Academic Misconduct (COAM) expect that all students will complete all academic and scholarly assignments with fairness and honesty.Failure to follow the rules and guidelines established in the University’s Code of Student Conduct and this syllabus may constitute “Academic Misconduct”.

The Ohio State University’s Code of Student Conduct (Section 333523-04) defines academic misconduct as: “Any activity that tends to compromise the academic integrity of the University, or subvert the educational process”.Examples of academic misconduct include (but are not limited to) plagiarism, collusion (unauthorized collaboration), copying the work of another student, and possession of unauthorized materials during an examination.All suspected cases of academic misconduct will be reported to the University Committee on Academic Misconduct.If academic misconduct has been committed, possible sanctions could include a failing grade in this course and suspension or dismissal from the University.(To be updated) Selected Reference Materials (to be updated) Reference Texts: Earth Sci 425 Brown, Lester, 2006, Plan B 2.

0: Rescuing a Planet Under Stress and a Civilization in Trouble, Norton, New York, 365 p.See on line: Read an excerpt of "Plan B: A Plan of Hope" at olicy.htm Now, for the first time, we have in PLAN B 2.It includes a restructuring of the global economy, the eradication of poverty and stabilization of population, and the protection and restoration of the earth's forests, soils, and fisheries., 1993, Living Within Limits –Ecology, Economics, and Population Taboos: Oxford University Press, New York 339 p.Kennedy, Donald (ed) and the editors of Science magazine, 2006, Science magazine’s State of the Planet, 2006 -2007: Island Press, Washington, see (Chow, Kopp and Portney – Energy Resources and Global Development – p.2006 (paperback), The Long Emergency: Surviving the End of Oil, Climate Change, and Other Converging Catastrophes of the Twenty-First Century : Atlantic Monthly Press, New York.172 The Prize:The Epic Quest for Oil, Money & Power video 8-part documentary based on Dan Yergin’s Book, 1992.The End of Suburbia video (on line also) Element One video Energy video (parts) Coal video (AEP) (parts) Bartlett’s Exponential lecture (2002) Syriana movie (opened Dec 2005) An Inconvenient Truth movie (2006) Simmons, Mathew, 2005, Twilight in the Desert: The Coming Saudi Oil Shock and the World Economy,: John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ.*Scientific American, 2006, Energy’s Future Beyond Carbon – Energy Solution for Sustainable World, v.to be published in Mar 2007 as Editors of Scientific American Magazine (eds), 2007, Scientific American Oil and the Future of Energy: Solutions Beyond Carbon from Today’s Top Scientists (paperback), The Lyons Press, ISBN 1599211173 .The following demonstrates the need for and relevance of Earth Sci 425.With some work we could ramp up this course for many more students here at OSU.The skills and knowledge gained and developed in it are directly applicable to local and national governments and organizations now.

Energy is one of the key components of sustainability.Sustainability must be considered in the context of climate change, other geologic resources (including water), population growth, and the complexity of the Earth System.Earth Policy Institute News Release For Immediate Release October 1, 2008 (release has been modified (G McK)., 2006, Oil’s History of Booms and Busts: Towards the Ultimate Downturn.21, Byrd Polar Research Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 46 pages.Waltzer, Kurt, (with editing by others), 2006, Ohio Climate Road Map: Part Two, Ohio Environmental Council, Wright, Ronald, 2005, A Short History of Progress: Avalon Publishers, New York, 211 p.PEOPLE IN ACTION: SPREADING THE PLAN B VISION /Books / Journals and Papers: Worldwatch Institute Publications such as State of the World, and Worldwatch Magazine see: /front p age & /taxono my/term/37 Each year, Earth Policy Institute receives hundreds of letters and e-mails from people who are inspired by our work and are eager to help in building a sustainable future.

They have reached out to their communities, co-workers and peers, religious groups, and elected officials to outline the urgency of addressing the mounting pressures on our global environment.Other References and Materials: To help spread our vision, people have joined our Plan B, 173 Plan B 2.0 teams and have handed out thousands of copies of Earth Policy Institute’s books to friends, family members, and local leaders to inform them of the problems we face as a global community and what we must do to save our failing civilization.The teams (who can be viewed at /Books/PB3/Pl anB3 ) are captained by Ted Turner who distributed 5,500 copies of Plan B 3.

0: Mobilizing to Save Civilization to the U.Congress, heads of state, Fortune 500 CEOs, the world’s billionaires, the European Parliament, and others.the Aravalli Hills in northern India, which were denuded by deforestation and mining.

The foundation has planted thousands of trees and native plants to reforest the desertified region.

Additionally, the foundation has built water storage dams to prevent water runoff from the hills.The project’s success has served as a model to further increase awareness of water management in India.• The Energy + Environment Foundation, dedicated to providing free course materials for high schools and universities on global environmental and energy challenges, is using materials derived from Plan B 3.The initiative is a collaborative effort involving individuals from academic institutions, governmental and nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector.Like Earth Policy Institute President Lester Brown says, “Saving civilization is not a spectator sport.” The level of dedication we have seen from people proves this.Earth Policy Institute would like to highlight some of the people from around the world who have mobilized to encourage political, environmental, and social change.

For more examples, go to /Books/Reachi .• After hearing Lester Brown address the European Parliament in March 2008, Ilke PedersenBeyst immediately organized an information session on green issues for expatriates in Brussels.The meeting became a call to action and resulted in a volunteer organization called Sunbeams.Sunbeams circulates news and information on the environment throughout the expatriate community.In October, Sunbeams will distribute copies of Earth Policy Institute’s “Time for Plan B: Cutting Carbon Emissions 80 Percent by 2020” at a welcome fair for expatriates.

Freeman Allen submitted a copy of “Time for Plan B: Cutting Carbon Emissions 80 Percent by 2020” to the California Air Resources Board following solicitation for public comment on its plan for reducing the state’s greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020.This is the first step toward achieving Governor Schwarzenegger’s goal for reducing greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent from 1990 levels by is also working with the League of Women Voters to encourage support of Plan B and is active in developing a Sustainable Claremont Plan.• After hearing a lecture by Lester Brown, Jay Sehgal, Executive Director of the The Sehgal Foundation, was inspired to start an initiative to green • Roger Ebbage, Director of the Lane Community College Energy Management Program in Eugene, Oregon, made Plan B 3.

0 required reading for all new program 174 students and purchased copies of the book for every student.McKenzie: 305 ML Lecture MW 3:30-5:18 pm; 252 ML COURSE SYLLABUS Office: After Class, B T 8:30-10:18am; (#17437-1) 252 ML AND SCHEDULE or by appointment B M 5:30- 7:18pm; (#17438-7) 252 ML Spring 2008 292-0655; email protected • Lars and Doris Almstr m of Sweden translated Plan B 2.0 into Swedish and posted it on their website designed to make this “labor of love” publicly available.After completing this translation, they immediately began translating Plan B 3.

0-and found an enthusiastic publisher, Addera F rlag AB.The book had a spectacular release in September 2008 and is available for free downloading at .They and the publisher are developing a Swedish Plan B 3.The Almstr ms are now turning their attention to translating Earth Policy Institute’s Updates and Indicators.

Date Lecture Topic Readings for class (Pg)* Lab Topics (bold); Class Assignments/ Hmwk Mar 24 M Organization of Course 9-12 1.Earth Materials; Building Field • The “What You and I Can Do” section in Plan B 2.0 struck home with Pierre-Yves Longaretti, head of the French astrophysics research lab in Grenoble.In partnership with Philippe Vieille, who heads a biotech company, they translated the book into French and contracted with Calmann-L vy to publish satisfied with simply publishing a book, they established Alternative Plan taire, an NGO dedicated to disseminating Earth Policy Institute’s Updates in French, providing a Plan B tailored specifically for France, and moving businesses into becoming carbon neutral.Trips Mar 26 W Discipline; Physiography 257-274 Development of the 1-16 Geomorphology References due M – Mar 31.Exer #1 Basic Concepts; Earth Systems 19-30 (Requires a visit to Orton Library) Mar 31 M Tectonics Construct.Photos/ Maps/ Images ; Physiography Folding Construct.Forms: 67-88 Apr 2 W Flow Glaciers and Glacier 353-370 Term from the Glossary, due M - Apr 7, Exer #2 Erosion by Glaciers //home/vdimitrov/12413/0743935460ff44696d9b1f1eff 10 1 08 (Requires a visit to Orton Library) Apr 7 M Glaciers; 175 Deposition 373-390 by 3.

Coastal Landforms Landforms; Glacier Bay History Glacial 9W Weathering Processes, Landforms 117-142 Lab Exam (M and T ) Apr 14 M MegaGeomorphology, Maps 21 W Seminar Presentations 4.Maps, Images Paper due Friday, May 23 + MegaGeomorphology Apr 21 M Soils Caves and 147-165 Processes, May 26 M Memorial Day No Class --Prepare for final exam and seminar presentations May 28 W Seminar Presentations Karst; 5.Tectonic and Volcanic Landforms Apr 23 W Midterm (including Volcanism) EXAM Paper/Seminar Topic+Outline; due M April 28, Exer #4 Apr 28 M Mass Movement 169-194 Final Examination, Thur, June 5, 3:30-5:18, Room 252 ML 6.Apr 30 W Landforms * For Discussion read intro pages (definitions, overview, process), bold and italicized words, diagrams Periglacial Processes, 309 -322 ** Concept map intro at / Bownocker or other lecture report; Due M, May 12, Exer #5 May 1 R Bownocker Lectures, School of Earth Sciences, with ideas, examples and explanation./Publications/ResearchPapers/Theor yCmaps/ for intro to concepts, linking phrases, and the focus question of making a concept map.

For this assignment start with the word GLACIER --the question might be what are the landforms, materials and processes in this system that contains a glacier and how are they connected.

? James Hansen, NASA, 4 and 8 pm, ML 100 May 3 SAT Field TRIP to Wisconsinan Ice Sheet Margin 7:35 AM – 5 PM (Brief Field Notes due M, May 5) May 5 M Review /ACES100/Mind/ ; /vlearning/ ? fuseaction=concept maps /st/enUS/Products/SMART+Ideas/ (free trial) other tools at /lanzing/cm ; (or Rivers + Field Trip 198-226 7.Landslides/Subsidence 7W Fluvial Landforms Drainage Patterns Coasts: hand sketches as an option) & 231-274 May 12 M Landforms and May 19 M Eolian Proc.Final Concept** map for Glacier Systems, due M Apr 14.Exer #3 Volcanic 92-112 Systems 14 W Coasts; Dunes; Basin Morphometry; Misc.

History 16 W Landforms River Proc, 417-458 176 Reading Assignments You will be expected to read the material (see pages) in the textbook that corresponds to the lecture topic for the day.Additional readings may be assigned from library materials and WEB.EarthSci 550 Course Syllabus and Schedule Spring '08 (cont’d) Examinations There will be a midterm exam and a final exam.Paper Final Course Grade Grade will be determined as follows: One summary, review and critique of an approved scientific paper is required.

I will suggest some options from recent and classical literature; others will be considered.Submit proposed topic and brief outline by M, April 28.Paper is to be two pages (no cover), including text, references and diagrams, in the accepted format of a scientific journal.The paper will be graded according to: 1) coverage of the subject matter in the paper, 2) your interpretations and ideas, 3) the quality and accuracy of your prose, and 4) format headings, references, figures with captions (you can modify), etc.Points reduced for paper after the due date unless agreement has been reached with me before the due date.Papers are to be typed, single or double-spaced (11 pt font), without spelling errors (whiteout or last-minute corrections in ink are okay).When you use the ideas of others you must indicate with a reference to the source in the body of the paper.) of key points using overhead transparencies or Power Point (+a copy of abstract of your paper for distribution to the class in last two weeks (May 21 and 28).Class and Hmwk Assignments: Final Exam 25 #1 Geomorphology Refs Labs 25 #2 Review of Glossary Term Midterm Exam 25 #3 Concept Map of Glacier System Field Trip + Report 5 #4 Outline of Paper Seminar Presentation +Paper 5 #5 Lecture Report (Bownocker or other) Assignments, participation, attendance 15 #6 Favorite Image or Diagram Report Academic Objectives In this course we want you to: • understand the important concepts, terms and ideas of geomorphology, • appreciate and know its historical development, • develop skills and competencies to handle the basic techniques of geomorphological investigations, 177 • • After lab period, any access to materials will be provided by your lab instructor, probably in 252 ML.be able to “read the landscape” to make reasonable interpretations of the landforms, the materials and structure of the landforms, the processes that form have produced the landscapes, and history of the landscape, understand the potential for application of geomorphology to geological, geophysical and environmental problems.Teaching Associate Office Hours Ben Kirby Hall TBA Office e-mail Office Phone 245 Orton email protected TBA EarthSci 550 Course Syllabus and Schedule Spring '08 (cont’d) Textbook Bloom, A.

, 1998, Geomorphology, 3rd: Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ .This classic has been reprinted by another publisher (Waveland Press); either version is fine.There may be assigned readings from texts and journals on reserve in Orton Library or on-line in Carmen.Field Trip There will be one required field trip.

You will make field notes on a field guide; questions about the trip will be on the final exam.Departure is from in front of Orton Hall at 7:45 a.Bring a lunch; however, we will have an opportunity to obtain food, possibly at an ice cream factory.Know what was covered/assigned if you miss a class.This syllabus is only a guide to the topics covered.

We reserve the right to change what topics are covered and on which days they will be covered.Any changes, should they be necessary, will be announced in class and on line, if time.Make friends with someone in the class from whom you can obtain notes and other information on what was covered in class and in the laboratory should you miss a class.Basic outlines from class will be LAB Exercises Lab exercises may require more time than a lab period.

The labs are on Tuesday 8:30-10:18 am and Monday 5:18-7:18 pm, with open lab at other times when room is available (shared with EarthSci 530) (times ML 252 open? –posted on door).

Labs will be due on Friday at 4:30 pm each week, unless other instructions are given by your lab instructor.There are 9 lab periods, including the Lab EXAM.These lab exercises are an important part of the course -- don't skip any.178 available during or following class.

These will not cover everything that was discussed and covered in class.It is your responsibility to know what was assigned, etc.If you need help, seek it early in the Quarter.Regular attendance and participation in class and in lab will be factors in your grade / successful completion of the course.You should make use of Physical Geology textbooks used in EarthSci 121 for additional background and review information on topics covered in this course.

Also, maintain your own glossary of new words encountered in this course A list of basic terms that you should know will be available in class.students will complete all academic and scholarly assignments with fairness and honesty.Students must recognize that failure to follow the rules and guidelines established in the University's Code of Student Conduct and this syllabus may constitute "Academic Misconduct." The Ohio State University's Code of Student Conduct (Section 3335-2304) defines academic misconduct as: "Any activity that tends to compromise the academic integrity of the university, or subvert the educational process." Examples of academic misconduct include (but are not limited to) plagiarism, collusion (unauthorized collaboration), copying the work of another student, and possession of unauthorized materials during an examination.

Ignorance of the University's Code of Student Conduct is never considered an "excuse" for academic misconduct, so I recommend that you review the Code of Student Conduct and, specifically, the sections dealing with academic misconduct.If I suspect that a student has committed academic misconduct in this course, I am obligated by University Rules to report my suspicions to the Committee on Academic Misconduct.If COAM determines that you have violated the University's Code of Student Conduct (i., committed academic misconduct), the sanctions for the misconduct could include suspension or dismissal from the University and a failing grade in this course.

If you have any questions about the above policy, please contact me.Other sources of information on academic misconduct (integrity) include If you have a disability, contact us privately at the first of the quarter so that we may discuss and accommodate your needs to the extent this is possible.Also contact the ODS at-- ph 292-3307 or at 150 Pomerene Hall to coordinate reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities.Academic Misconduct, any activity that tends to compromise academic integrity or subvert the educational process, will not be tolerated.See the Student Resource Guide for policy information.

Academic integrity is essential to maintaining an environment that fosters excellence in teaching, research, and other educational and scholarly activities.Thus, The Ohio State University and the Committee on Academic Misconduct (COAM) expect that all students have read and understand the University's Code of Student Conduct, and that all 179 Costa, J., 1981, Surficial Geology: Building with the Earth: Wiley, New York, 498p Cotton, C., 1958, Geomorphology: Whitcombe & Tombs, Christchurch, NZ, 505p Davis, W., ( n, ed) 1954, Geographical Essays: Dover Publications,777p Dixon, J.

, (eds) 1992, Periglacial Geomorphology: Wiley, NY, 354p Easterbrook, D., 1993, Surface Processes and Landforms: MacMillan, NY, 520p Gardiner, V., 1983, Geomorphological Field Manual: George Allen & Unwin, London, UK, 254p Goldthwait, R., (ed) 1975, Glacial Deposits: Dowden Hutchinson & Ross, Stroudsburg, PA, 464p Jennings, J.

, 1985, Karst Geomorphology: Basil Blackwell, Oxford, UK293p Rice, R., 1977, Fundamentals of Geomorphology: Longman, London,UK, 387p Ritter, D.

, 2002, Process Geomorphology: McGraw-Hill, Boston, 560p Short, N.

, (eds) 1986, Geomorphology from Space: NASA (see also on line) /DAAC DO CS/geomorphology/GEO COMPLETE Sugden, D.

, 1976, Glaciers and Landscape: Arnold, London, UK 376p Thornbury, W., 1956, Principles of Geomorphology: Wiley, NY, 618p COAM's web page (< /coam/ l>) and "Eight Cardinal Rules of Academic Integrity" (< /uacc / > Course Evaluation SEI available at Final Exam; suggestions (“continue, start, stop”) welcome during the quarter to enable midcourse corrections.Additional References (check on-line for latest editions; also use the geomorph list you compiled for newer books & pubs) Textbooks and proceedings of meetings — Benn, D.A, Glaciers & Glaciation: Arnold (London), John Wiley, (New York), 734p.

, 1990, World Geomorphology: Cambridge Univ., 1984, Methuen, London, 605p EarthSci 550 Course Syllabus and Schedule Spring '08 (cont’d) Coates, D.

(ed) 1971, Environmental Geomorphology: Pubs.In Geomorphology, SUNY, Binghamton, NY, 262p Coates, D.(ed) 1972, Environmental Geomorphology and Landscape Conservation V1: Prior to 1900: Dowden Hutchinson & Ross, Stroudsburg, PA, 464p Coates, D.

, (ed) 1973, Coastal Geomorphology: Pubs.In Geomorphology, SUNY, Binghamton, NY, 403p Lab Manuals – Easterbrook, D., 1999, Interpretation of Landforms from Topographic Maps and Air Photographs Laboratory Manual: Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 192p Mayer, L., 1990, Introduction to Quantitative Geomorphology: Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 380p 180 Morisawa, M, 1983, Geomorphology Laboratory Manual: Wiley, 253p TEXTS: COSTS: Ohio Geomorphology— Lafferty, M.(ed) 1972, Ohio’s Natural Heritage: Ohio Academy of Science, Columbus, OH : 324p Stuckey, R.

2003, Linking Ohio Geology and Botany: Papers by Jane L.Forsyth: RLS Creations, Columbus, OH, 338p Websites on topics of geomorphologic interest will be provided in related lectures.03: Field Geology for Educators: Geologic Setting of Lake Erie SUMMER QUARTER, 2008 OFFERINGS: 12 – 18 June 2008, through the F.

Stone Laboratory Program INSTRUCTOR: Krissek Dr.Larry 215 Orton Hall, 155 South Oval, Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210 Tel: (614) 2921924, or -2721 E-mail: email protected None required.In addition to your normal tuition, you have already been notified of the additional cost for this course.

Best websites to buy a ecology coursework doctoral single spaced 45 pages / 12375 words editing

This charge includes all lodging, three meals while we are at Stone Lab (dinner on Saturday, breakfast and lunch on Sunday), transportation, lab fee, and course handouts.This amount should be paid to the Stone Lab office as soon as possible, if you have not already done so.You will also be responsible for the costs of your own meals for the remainder of the trip (Sunday email protected 181 dinner through Friday lunch) table of contents University of North Florida.You will also be responsible for the costs of your own meals for the remainder of the trip (Sunday email protected 181 dinner through Friday lunch).

We anticipate using low-cost meal opportunities as much as possible.SUPPLIES: made by Ritein-the-Rain (which have a cover of heavy stock paper and contain ~45 pages), then you should buy at least two of those smaller notebooks.

You will need a ruler, pencils and pens, and a water bottle, and a collection of 56 colored pencils will be useful.You may want to bring a camera, hand lens, and rock hammer, if you have them jreference.com/dissertation/who-can-help-me-with-my-custom-dietetics-and-human-nutrition-dissertation-24-hours-business-chicago.You may want to bring a camera, hand lens, and rock hammer, if you have them.In past years, students have also found it helpful to bring a clipboard.You will receive a fieldguide and worksheets, but you also should purchase and bring a field notebook -preferably one of the hardbound, 7.75” field notebooks with waterproof paper (made by companies such as Leitz, K&E, or Ritein-the-Rain).These may be available at a university bookstore or an engineering supply store – examples are the Engineer’s Field Book or Engineer’s Level Book sold by Ben Meadows Co.If you purchase the smaller field notebooks LODGING: 182 We will be staying in the dormitories at Stone Lab on Saturday.On Sunday, we will be staying at a bunkhouse at Old Woman Creek National Estuarine Research Center; on the other nights, we will be staying at motels.

situation changes on short notice and we have more participants, though, some of you may choose to sleep in sleeping bags in the motel rooms, as well.For the nights at Stone Lab and Old Woman Creek you will need the following: 1) either a sleeping bag or your own sheets, 2) a pillowcase, and 3) a towel.Pillows are provided at Stone Lab, but not at the Old Woman Creek bunkhouse.Our schedule of lodging contacts is as follows: Saturday: Stone Lab dormitories; (419) 2852341 You will be staying in four-person rooms at Stone Lab.There are two 8-person bunkrooms at Old Woman Creek, one for the women and one for the men.

Sunday: Bunkhouse, Old Woman Creek National Estuary Research Center, Huron, OH; no telephone On the other nights, each motel room will have two double beds; at this point, it appears that each room will have two occupants.In case that Monday and Tuesday: Comfort Inn at Cleveland Airport, Middleburg Heights;(440) 234-3131 183 the following scale: Wednesday and Thursday: Days Inn, Conneaut; (440) 5936000 CLOTHES: > 90% of the total points = A or A80 – 89% of the total points = B-, B, or B+ 70 – 79% of the total points = C-, C, or C+ 60 – 69% of the total points = D or D+ <60% of the total points In addition to the sleeping bag or sheets and towel mentioned above, you should bring along "normal" field equipment for this trip -raingear, sturdy footwear, hat, sunscreen, etc.Our work along the lakeshore will involve some wading, so you should also bring footwear and clothes that can get wet.GRADES: TENTATIVE SCHEDULE Saturday: Drive to Stone Lab; introduction to the geology of Ohio and Lake Erie.Sunday: Grades will be assigned on the basis of field exercises and field notebooks (80%) and participation (20%).

GRADING SCALE: = E Glacial grooves and Devonian limestone at Kelley's Island; coastal features near Sandusky.Grades will be assigned according to Monday: Coastal 184 features between Sandusky and Vermilion; bedrock geology in the Rocky River valley investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( studenta /i nfo for studen ts/ ).

Tuesday: Bedrock geology of the Rocky River valley; bedrock geology, glacial geology, and habitats of the Cuyahoga Valley National Recreationa l Area Wednesday: Coastal features and glacial geology of Lake and Ashtabula counties Thursday: Bedrock geology of the Niagara Falls area Friday: Return to Columbus.ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT: It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the 1 DISABILITY STATEMENT: Students with disabilities that 185 have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated , and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 2923307, TDD 292-0901; /.215 Orton Hall, 155 South Oval, Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210 Tel: (614) 2921924, or -2721 E-mail: email protected email protected OBJECTIVES: The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of the global ocean, its characteristics, its important fundamental processes, and the interrelationshi ps of its physical, chemical, biological, and geological systems.We will also develop an appreciation of the important effects of the ocean on global climate and global change.

TEXTS: Leckie and Yuretich, Investigating the Ocean: An Interactive Guide to the Science of Oceanography.EARTH SCIENCES 584: Principles of Oceanography for Educators SUMMER QUARTER, 2008 OFFERINGS: INSTRUCTOR: Krissek 15 – 21 June 2008 F.Larry 186 Primis Online (Custom Printing by McGraw-Hill).

Grades will be assigned on the basis of laboratory exercises (80%) and participation (20%).GRADES: GRADING SCALE: Sunday evening Introduction, history of oceanography Monday afternoon lab session Monday morning Physiography of the oceans (with labs) Biolab cruise; Monday evening Formation/evolution of ocean basins (with labs) Tuesday morning Physics/chemistry of seawater (with labs) Grades will be assigned according to the following scale: Tuesday afternoon Ocean circulation (with labs) Tuesday evening > 90% of the total points = A or A80 – 89% of the total points = B-, B, or B+ 70 – 79% of the total points = C-, C, or C+ 60 – 69% of the total points = D or D+ <60% of the total points Open Wednesday morning Ocean circulation (with labs); Kelley's Island fieldtrip Wednesday afternoon fieldtrip Kelley’s Island Wednesday evening Open Thursday morning Ocean circulation (with labs); ROV demonstration Thursday afternoon systems in the ocean Biological (with labs) Thursday evening Biological systems (if necessary); Research Brief and Guest Lecture Friday morning Lake Erie shore Friday afternoon Lake Erie shore TENTATIVE SCHEDULE 187 Field trip: Friday evening sediments (with labs) = E Field trip: Marine Saturday morning Finish marine sediments +/- tides; finish exercises 3335-5-487).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( studenta /i nfo for studen ts/ ).ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT: It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.

The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.

Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 2 DISABILITY STATEMENT: Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated , and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 2923307, TDD 292-0901; /.188 Earth Sciences 663 189 GLOBAL CHANGE AND SUSTAINABILITY IN THE EARTH SYSTEM Winter Quarter, ---------- 5 Credit Hours Call Number: --------------- Geological Sciences 663 INSTRUCTORS OFFICE HRS Lecture/Discussion: 3:30 – 5:18 M W Dr.Garry McKenzie Mendenhall Lab 252 305 Mendenhall (292-0655) appointment email protected Recitation: 12:30 – 1:18 F Mendenhall Lab 252 Dr.Lonnie Thompson 102 Orton Hall (292-2616) appointment email protected M 2-3 or by T 2-3 or by Course Schedule: Class meets M W 0330-0518, F 1230-0118 in ML 252 Wk 1 ESS - The Biogeochemical and Social Process diagrams; Global Change Challenge; PreQuaternary Earth History; Overview of Pleistocene and Holocene Environmental Change Wk 2 Atmospheric/Ocean System: Evidence/ Mechanisms for Global Warming; ENSO cycles; Pollutosphere; Ozone; Ocean Circulation and Climate Change Wk 3 Green History of the World: Impacts of Earth System changes; Understanding Sustainability – Natural Sciences & Social Sciences; Key factors? -- environment, energy, water and mineral/biological resources.

An Operating Manual? Wk 4 Demography 101; Industrial and other revolutions and growth; Carrying Capacity Concept; Human Population – Options(?) Control, reduce, do nothing; Island Model; Scenario Assignment Wk 5 Wk 6 Wk 7 Wk8 Wk9 Terrestrial System: Natural Processes and Hazards; Humans as geologic agents Other Earth System hazards, risks and responses; Natural Protection of GAIA? Global Climate Change Research: Objectives, Players, History, Ice Core Records; Other records of climate: Tree Ring, Coral, Lake and Marine Sediment Core Records Natural Resources – Life support system – Geological: Energy, water, minerals; Biological: Forests, grasslands, farmlands, oceans; Exhaustible vs inexhaustible and early warnings (per capita use) Term Exam Approaches to Sustainability: World Summits, NGOs, Sustainable Development; Julian Simon & Cornucopian Views; Resources/Quality of Life; Forecasting & Dire Predictions, Possibilities of Collapse (C.Brown, and others and older references) Sustainability Summit Team Presentations (based partly on individual’s working papers) Wk10 Drafting Sustainability Agreement (in-class and homework activity) Final Exam: Your Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth (based on Sustainability Summit notes, presentations, class notes) 190 The basic questions are: What impacts do humans have on global environmental change and their own sustainability and how can we understand the changing Earth system, guide public policy to reduce human environmental impact and achieve sustainability? Prerequisites: Senior standing in Earth Sciences, Graduate Standing, or permission of instructor*.--------------------• We plan on opening the course for other undergraduates but currently they will be accommodated in the “Permission of Instructor” category.Course Content: Analysis of Earth systems, global environmental change and options for sustainability.The objective is to understand global change and sustainability from a geoscience perspective.

Key Course Materials On Reserve or available through Carmen Updates have not been made……-TBA.Brown, L and others, 2003, State of the World, 2001—A Worldwatch Institute Report on Progress toward A Sustainable Society: W., 2003, PLAN B: Rescuing a Planet under Stress and a Civilization in Trouble: Norton, New York, 285 p., 1995, How many People Can the Earth Support? Norton, New York, 532 p., 1993, Living within Limits: Oxford University Press Kennedy, D.

Policy and the Global Environment – Memos to the President: Aspen Institute, Washington, DC ( ), 220 p., 1999, The Earth System: Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 351 p.

, 1998, Our Changing Planet: An Introduction to Earth System Science and Global Environmental Change: Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ., 1989 (1990), Envisioning A Sustainable Society: State University of New York Press, Albany, 403 p.

Tyler, 2001, Environmental Science: (8th): Brooks/Cole, Pacific Grove, CA, 549 +index p., 2001, Population and Climate Change: Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 266p Ponting, Clive,1991(1993), A Green History of the World: The Environment and the Collapse of Great Civilizations: Penguin Books, New York.

Subcommittee on Global Change Research, U.National Science and Technology Council, 2000, Our Changing Planet – The FY 2001 U.Global Change Research Program: Office of Science and Technology Policy, Washington, DC, 74 p.

(Ed), 2001, Climate Change 2001: Synthesis Report : Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK 191 Course Notes : Thompson, L.-- Selected Readings and Exercises for a Sustainable Earth System: Recitation The recitation and group work exercises and individual assignments are important parts of this course.Read the intros to the topics for the recitations before coming to class and complete any assigned homework before the due date.

Maximum points reduced for late assignments; see your group partners for information on exercises.Know the material covered by doing the work and understanding the concepts/processes.Recitations in the last half of the quarter will be for work on he Sustainability Summit and the Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth Field Trip will be made to Byrd Polar Research Center A 1-hr field trip will visit the research facilities of the Byrd Polar Research Center.Students will observe the ice core research facilities (clean room, freezer, equipment center, drilling design and fabrication center, and review research results obtained by this group) and meet with research scientists.Other research groups at BPRC will be visited as time permits (Glaciology, Oceanography, Climate Dynamics, Remote Sensing).

Other Field Trips to research centers or groups, business that are addressing sustainability will also be available as an option.Methods of Evaluation Recitation and in-class Activities and Exercises 20% Scenario Assignment ( Two Pages) 20% Sustainability Summit Team Presentations and Discussions (+your working paper) 20% Term Exam – On key concepts and components of Earth System & Sustainability 20% Final Exam –Your two-page Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth 20% Course Objectives Participation in this course will enable: 1) improved awareness of the biogeosphere (Earth system) and its relation to the humans, 2) improved understanding of the processes, materials, and history of global change, 3) critical thinking, using the techniques and reasoning of the Earth Sciences, 4) evaluation of the growing number of articles in the popular press and scientific journals concerning global change, its implications for society, and the new agenda for science, 5) understanding the potential impact globally and in Ohio of potential large-scale global environmental change 192 6) informed decisions about your role on and choices for Spaceship Earth, and 7) preparation of the following materials for participants and others: • Scenarios for the Next 50 years • Working Papers for Sustainability Summit Teams • Sustainability Summit Agreement • Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth Special Accommodations Students needing accommodation based on disability impact should contact the instructor privately at the first of the quarter or before to discuss specifics and also the Office of Disability Services (292-3307 or at room 150 Pomerene Hall to coordinate reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities.Academic Misconduct Any activity that tends to compromise academic integrity or subvert the educational process, will not be tolerated.See the Student Resource Guide for policy information.Academic integrity is essential to maintaining an environment that fosters excellence in teaching, research, and other educational and scholarly activities.

Thus, The Ohio State University and the Committee on Academic Misconduct (COAM) expect that all students have read and understand the University's Code of Student Conduct, and that all students will complete all academic and scholarly assignments with fairness and honesty.Students must recognize that failure to follow the rules and guidelines established in the University's Code of Student Conduct and this syllabus may constitute "Academic Misconduct." The Ohio State University's Code of Student Conduct (Section 3335-23-04) defines academic misconduct as: "Any activity that tends to compromise the academic integrity of the university, or subvert the educational process." Examples of academic misconduct include (but are not limited to) plagiarism, collusion (unauthorized collaboration), copying the work of another student, and possession of unauthorized materials during an examination.Ignorance of the University's Code of Student Conduct is never considered an "excuse" for academic misconduct, so I recommend that you review the Code of Student Conduct and, specifically, the sections dealing with academic misconduct.

If I suspect that a student has committed academic misconduct in this course, I am obligated by University Rules to report my suspicions to the Committee on Academic Misconduct.If COAM determines that you have violated the University's Code of Student Conduct (i., committed academic misconduct), the sanctions for the misconduct could include suspension or dismissal from the University and a failing grade in this course.If you have any questions about the above policy, please contact me.

Other sources of information on academic misconduct (integrity) include COAM's web page (< /coam/ >) and "Eight Cardinal Rules of Academic Integrity" (< /uacc/ >) Academic dishonesty, including cheating and plagiarism, will not be tolerated.See University Rule 3335-31-02 for prosecution of violations.Class Format 193 Lecture/Discussion Each class will begin with a 5-min recapitulation and discussion of current events, using transparencies of newspapers and Web news, and network feeds.This will be followed by a 60+ minute, multimedia presentation /discussion by the instructor and/or guest lecturer on the topic of the day.For the last 45 minutes of the class you will respond to specific questions and solve problems about the topic in written and oral format, in order to assess what you and your fellow students have learned and think about the topic.

Any additional homework or special tasks will then be assigned.This format provides a mix of lecture/discussion/group problem solving, and individual study and research that accommodates the range of learning styles and prepares you for real-world problem solving.Recitation and Group Problem-Solving Activity The recitation will explore topics covered in lecture through exercises for which you must provide your own answers, although peer teaching and small group discussion is encouraged.These sessions will also give you a chance to raise questions that have arisen from the lecture, the assigned readings, and outside readings.Each lecture/discussion will have a brief classroom activity also; the recitation will help in reviewing those activities.

You will complete a short “working paper” on an approved topic of your choice related to sustainability and global change.The range of topic options could include: Arguments for and against global warming, Human component of climate change, Human component of environmental change, Carrying Capacity of Earth, Options for end of growth in human population, Scenario development and future games, Proposal for global change education in pre-college classrooms, Models and games for how the world works, Wiring diagram for biogeochemical and social models of the Earth system, Sustainability options, etc.At the end of the course, you will participate in teams in a Sustainability Summit where some of the working papers will provide background information for team presentations on how the Earth or regions could achieve sustainability.Students will determine the organization and negotiation methods and the procedures for resolving and implementing the recommendations proposed by the “ambassadors” (including NGO representatives) at this summit.Similar forums have worked well in increasing student interest, participation, and performance in cooperative learning settings that explore global matters (Gautier and Schweizer, 1994; Berkman, 1997).

Presentations will aid in a summit sustainability agreement.The final assignment is your Operating Manual For Spaceship Earth.Guest Speakers When scientists with research interests appropriate to topics of the course visit BPRC or other centers at OSU, they will be invited to meet with the class or the class will convene at the site of the guest lecture to the extent that this is possible.This approach will bring the latest thinking and/or different perspectives to our students and will make available research expertise and results from institutions world-wide.************************************************************************ *************** ADDITIONAL READINGS (some ON RESERVE IN ORTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY) e.

Anonymous, 1990, Managing Planet Earth, Readings from Scientific American, W., 1997, Antarctic Science and Policy: Interdisciplinary Research Education (ASPIRE):BPRC Report No.13, Byrd Polar Research Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH Berner, E., 1996, Global Environment: Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ Brown, L and others, multiple years , State of the World, (Annual Reviews) , New York, NY Brown, L and Kane, H.

, 1994, Full House: Reassessing the Earth’s Population Carrying Capacity: Norton, NY Earth Systems Sciences Advisory Committee, NASA Advisory Council, 1988, Earth system science - A closer view: U.National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC, 208 p., 1994, Mini-Rio Summit: An innovative method for teaching the policy relevance of Earth system science: Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, v.Gore, Al, 1992, Earth in the Balance, N., 1983, Geologic Hazards, Resources, and Environmental Planning, 2nd ed., 1996, Global Environmental Change: Its Nature and Impact, Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ Keller, E.

Kumar, R and Murck, B, 1992, On Common Ground: Managing Human-Planet Relationships, John Wiley, NY McKenzie, G., 1975, Man and His Physical Environment, Readings in Environmental Geology, 2nd ed., 1996, Global Environmental Change: Blackwell Publishers.), Committee on the Status and Research Opportunities in the Solid Earth Sciences, 1993, Solid Earth Sciences and Society (Summary and Global Overview): National Research Council, National Academy Press, Washington, DC, 46 p., Global Issues: An Introduction :Blackwell Publishers Simon, J.Phelps (eds), 1995, The State of Humanity, Cambridge, Blackwell Turekian, K.

K, 1996, Global Environmental Change: Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ Utgard, McKenzie, and Foley, 1978, Geology in the Urban Environment, Minneapolis, Burgess, 355 p References and syllabus will be updated in the month before course is given.

Spring Quarter 2007 Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering 652 (call # 00829-4) Mon/Wed 2:00-3:18, Rm.104 FABE (Lab 2-4:48 Friday) 195 Ecosystems for Waste Treatment Instructor: Dr.Jay Martin 230 C Agricultural Engineering Bldg.247-6133 e-mail: email protected Office hours by appointment or directly after class.

Credits: 4 Level: U G Prereq: EEOB 413, or NAT RES 725, or FABE 625 or CIVIL ENG 520, or permission of instructor.Interdisciplinary Learning: Students with engineering and/or ecology backgrounds are encouraged to take this class.A goal of the course is to integrate students with engineering, ecology, and other backgrounds to foster a beneficial, interdisciplinary learning environment.Course Description: By designing and building ecological mesocosms for waste treatment and reviewing case studies, students will learn to design ecosystem-based systems to purify water and air.

Course Objectives (with American Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET) criteria—fulfillment of ABET criteria are required to maintain accreditation for departments of engineering) At the conclusion of the course students will be able to: ♦ Integrate engineering and ecological principles to design ecosystem-based systems to purify water and air (Criteria 3a,c,d,e,g,j,k).♦ Identify and describe the main components and processes of ecosystems fundamental to waste treatment design (Criteria 3c,j).♦ Evaluate and identify ecosystem technologies for waste treatment (Criteria 3b,c).♦ Demonstrate advantages of relying on ecosystems to restore water and air quality when compared to other approaches (Criteria 3b,h,j).Grading: Quiz 5% Exam I 15% Exam II 15% Research Project (describe project) 10% Research Project (written report) 40% Research Project (final presentation) 15% Quiz: A quiz covering introductory material will be taken during week three.

This is intended to test teaching and learning approaches early in the course, and will familiarize students with the instructor’s testing methods.Exam I: The first exam will be given during the 5th week of the course.Exam II: The second comprehensive exam will be given during the ninth week of the quarter.This may include questions regarding the design and research projects.Research Project: Throughout the quarter the students will re-design and monitor an ecological system used to treat wash-water from the campus dairy farm.

In 2007 this system will treat washwater from the OSU dairy facility.The grade will be based on weekly progress reports, participation, oral presentations, and a final report.Late Assignments will not be accepted unless arrangements are made before the due date.Course Logistics: The class will meet two times per week (78 minutes) and have a 196 weekly 3-hour lab to work on the design project.It is anticipated that class time may substitute for lab time during intensive phases of the design project.

Field Trips: The class will take one trip to visit the Oberlin College Living Machine (not mandatory).Texts: Assigned readings are listed on the schedule on the Carmen site.Many of the journal articles are also on this site, but you may have to download some from the OSU library.Some readings will be distributed in class.A list of additional references can be found on Carmen.

Academic Misconduct: All students are expected to adhere to the Rules and Regulations of Ohio State University and, in particular, to the rules regarding academic misconduct.Submitting plagiarized work to meet academic requirements, including the representation of another’s work or ideas as one’s own; the unacknowledged use and/or paraphrasing of another person’s work; the inappropriatey unacknowledged use of another person’s idea; and/or falsification, fabrication, or dishonesty in reporting research results shall be grounds for charges of academic misconduct.Such activities will be reported to the OSU Committee on Academic Misconduct.Disability Statement: All students with disabilities should contact Dr.Martin privately to arrange proper accommodations.

CE 618 / FABE 618 / ENR 618 Ecological Engineering and Science Winter 2007, 4 Credit hours, UG level This course is cross-listed between three academic units: Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering & Geodetic Sciences (CE 618, call number: 05040-1), Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering (FABE, call number: 00828-0), and School of Environment and Natural Resources (SENR, call number: 14874-1).Course Description: Definition, classification, and practice of ecological engineering.Course describes ecological ecosystems, ecosystem restoration, and the utilization of natural processes to provide societal services and benefits to nature.Class Times & Location: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:00-9:48 AM, Kottman 104 Course Prerequisites: Junior standing with at one course in one of the following subject areas; biology, ecology, engineering, or geology.Instructors: 197 Virginie Bouchard, School of Natural Resources, 412B Kottman Hall, Tel.

688-0268, email: email protected Robert Sykes, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering & Geodetic Sciences, 417A Hitchcock Hall, Tel.292-2748, email: email protected Jay Martin, Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, 230C Ag Eng Building, Tel.247-6133, email: email protected Text: Readings will be identified and can be downloaded from the OSU libraries website.Those not available will be distributed in class.The following books are recommended as reference material (placed on reserve in Agricultural Library).Ecological Engineering: An Introduction to Ecotechnology.Course Objective: To enable the students to: identify the key physical, biogeochemical and ecological processes occurring in ecosystems and utilize these processes to provide societal services; identify benefits of ecological engineering technologies (i., holistic solutions, energy savings, costs savings); apply natural processes to guide restoration and creation of ecosystems; and learn the fundamental design considerations of ecological engineered systems.

These objectives will be achieved with a combination of lectures, assigned exercises, readings, and a design project.Methods of instruction: The course is composed of two 2-hour weekly classes.The course will expose the students to fundamental understanding of ecological engineering in order to achieve the course objectives listed above.The lectures will also be built around the design project that the class will work on during the quarter.Indeed, the design project might be considered as the centerpiece of the course.

Time will be given during the lectures period for discussion of the design project.Design Project: This problem-based learning course will focus on applying concepts of Ecological Engineering to design a wetland to treat stormwater runoff from the OSU medical 198 center .The class will be divided into groups, and each group will work on the project.Each group will deliver a short oral presentation on January 25 (during class) to present the preliminary ideas.A final oral presentation will be held in class on March 8 (the last day of class).

Course Evaluation: The grade will be based on 100 possible points, as detailed below.The two midterms will determine each student’s degree of mastery of specific material covered in the course, and also to see how well each student can synthesize this material.There will be no final during final week.The absence of final should allow the class to spend extra time on the design project at the end of the quarter.1st Exam 25 pts 2nd Exam 25 pts Class Assignments (3) 15 pts Class Participation 5 pts Design Project 30 pts (Preliminary design 5 pts) (Individual report* 15 pts) (Oral group presentation 10 pts) Total 100pts *The text for this report must be written independently by each group member.

The same images, pictures and tables can be shared between group members.Office Hour Policy Our office doors are generally open, and if possible, we will address your questions and needs as soon as possible.However, you are encourage to call, e-mail, or see us after class to schedule an appointment.If you have just a few quick questions, we may want to discuss them right after class.Course Policies: Incompletes will only be considered if warranted by official OSU policy.

Academic misconduct: Submitting plagiarized work to meet academic requirements, including the representation of another’s work or ideas as one’s own; the unacknowledged use and/or paraphrasing of another person’s work; and/or the inappropriate unacknowledged use of another person’s idea; and/or the falsification, fabrication, or dishonesty in reporting research results, 199 shall be grounds for charges of academic misconduct.Please see the following web site for more details on academic misconduct and the code of student conduct./coam/ Disability Statement: All students with disabilities should contact the instructors privately to arrange proper accommodations.GEOG 520, CLIMATOLOGY Spring Quarter 2008, 5 credits, call number: 10196 M-W-F 10:30 AM - 11:48 AM, Derby Hall, Rm.

Jialin Lin Email: email protected This is the best way to reach me.Telephone: 614-292-6634 Office: 1105 Derby Hall Office Hours: Wednesday and Friday 4:00-5:00 PM, or by appointment Teaching Assistant: Mike Davis Email: email protected Telephone: 292-1333 Office: Derby Hall 0135 Office Hours: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:30 PM Textbook: "Understanding Weather and Climate" (4th ed.(has been ordered in the Central Classroom Building bookstore) Course Objectives: This course is designed to provide a broad introduction to climatology, the study of the average state of weather on planet Earth.Emphasis is made of planetary energy budgets, regional climates, climate change, and past and future climates.Energy budgets include the solar energy receipt, infrared radiation loss, turbulent heat fluxes, and the redistribution in the earth-atmosphere system as well as the role of atmospheric moisture, its global spatial distribution, and its importance in energy exchange, and cloud and precipitation formation.Course lectures will describe the causes, and the spatial distribution, of climates of the world as well as the physical mechanisms of some observed weather phenomena.

The physical causes of and spatial variations in small- and large-scale motions of the atmosphere will be described.The distribution and causes of 21st century climate will be explained and the distributions of past climates, methods for reconstructing them, and the potential explanations for them will be discussed.The course will also consider how humankind has both intentionally and unintentionally become a factor in the physical processes of weather and climate.Many students will find the basic concepts and ideas discussed in the course will have applications in their fields of interest as well as applications to their daily lives.200 Upon successful completion of this course, students should (1) be able to describe the structure and composition of the atmosphere and how it has changed with time; (2) know the factors causing solar radiant energy variations on earth and be able to describe global radiation balance; (3) be able to explain the physical processes leading to the formation of atmospheric features including clouds, precipitation, winds and storms; (4) have a good understanding of the physical behavior of gases, and of the different forms of energy and 201 their role in atmospheric motion and weather systems; (5) have a good understanding of environmental issues pertaining to the atmosphere including the "greenhouse effect", ozone depletion, air pollution and urban climate modification; and (6) be able to describe the general distribution on the world of temperature, precipitation and climates - and the factors and physical mechanisms which cause these distributions to occur as they do.

Methods for accomplishing these objectives: The objectives of the course will be accomplished through the lectures, homeworks/assignments, in-class presentations, and examinations.The lectures will include some material not covered in the textbook and may incorporate math to the level of algebra.Determination of your grade will be as follows: Homeworks or in-class assignments/quizzes (one per week – 7 total – will drop your worst score) 35% One in-class presentation (10 minutes) 10% Attendance, professionalism, and active participation 10% Two midterms and one final exam (3 total – will drop your worst exam score) 45% • This means each midterm is worth 22.If you do well on both, you can skip the final exam! The midterms will cover only the recent material, while the final will be comprehensive.

All exams will be multiple-choice (50 questions for each exam).The grading scale is as follows: 100-93% A, 92-90% A-, 89-87% B+, 86-83% B, 82-80% B-, 79-77% C+, 76-73% C, 72-70% C-, 69-67% D+, 66-63% D, 62-60% D-, 59% and below E.Please take note that a large portion of the materials that appear on the midterm and final exams will be covered in lecture only.Therefore, you are strongly encouraged to attend all classes or your final grade will suffer .The grading policy is very forgiving: the lowest scores on both the homeworks/assignments and exams will be dropped when calculating your final grade.

Therefore, no make-up exam will be given.Proof of a medical problem is necessary to excuse an absence on an examination date.The in-class presentation can be on any topics that you are interested in and are related to weather, climate or climate change, which is designed to encourage you to surf the climate-related websites and do your own research.Attendance is required for all in-class presentations and will count for 10% of your final grade (can improve your grade from C to B or from B to A!).

If you attend all classes and finish all the homeworks/assignments, you will likely do well on the exams.Lecture notes will be posted on the course website.Academic Misconduct It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not 202 limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).

For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( /info for students/ ).Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; /.Cell Phones Like on airplanes, interfere with navigation of the course, therefore, cell phones and pagers must be turned OFF during class as they interfere with the navigation of the course.Attend classes – 55% of your grade is based on in-class assignments and attendance/professionalism/participation.Actively participate in the in-class presentations and discussions.Check the course website frequently for updates.

Final Exam: June 4, 9:30-11:18am The schedule may change, probably only slightly, as the class evolves.Instructor will alert students if/when schedule changes.Course website /geo520/ COURSE LECTURE OUTLINE Date LECTURE (click the title of each lecture to download the powerpoint file) 03/24 Atmospheric Sciences at a Glance I 03/26 Atmospheric Sciences at a Glance II 03/28 In-class assignment I: Ice Man – The story of Lonnie Thompson 03/31 Composition and Structure of the Atmosphere 04/02 Global Energy Balance I: Solar Radiation and the Seasons 04/04 In-class assignment II: Mitigation of global warming 04/07 Global Energy Balance II: Greenhouse Effect 04/09 Atmosphere Pressure and Winds 04/11 In-class assignment III: The magic of water vapor 203 04/14 Midterm I Review 04/16 MIDTERM I 04/18 Preparation of in-class presentation 04/21 General Circulation of the Atmosphere and Oceans 04/23 Global Water Cycle I: Clouds and Fogs HW#1: Find and plot climate datasets on the web 04/25 In-class presentation 04/28 Global Water Cycle II: Precipitation Processes 04/30 Global Water Cycle III: Organized Precipitation Systems (from hurricanes to tornadoes) HW#2: Data collocation-Rainfall associated with major floods in U.

05/02 In-class presentation 05/05 Midterm II Review 05/07 MIDTERM II 05/09 In-class presentation 05/12 Tropical and Extratropical Climate 05/14 Modeling and Predicting the Global Climate System HW#3: Forecasting the global impacts of El Nino/Southern Oscillation in 2008 05/16 In-class presentation 05/19 Global Climate Change I: Observed Climate Change 05/21 Global Climate Change II: Projections and Impacts HW#4: Exploring the simulations of a global climate system model used for IPCC climate change projections 05/23 In-class presentation (current grades) 05/26 NO CLASS – Memorial Day 05/28 Final Exam Review 05/30 In-class presentation 06/02 NO CLASS (Final exam week) 06/04 FINAL EXAM, 9:30-11:18am Some climate-related websites: NASA’s earth missions: /missions/ NOAA Watch – NOAA’s All Hazard Monitor: / 204 El Nino Theme Page: /tao/elnino/ Hurricane Katrina / Intergovermental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC- 2007 Nobel Peace Prize Winner): / Climate TimeLine (Exploring weather & climate change through the powers of 10): /paleo/ctl/ GEOGRAPHY 210 Physical Geography and Environmental Issues SYLLABUS / SP08 Instructor Dr.Kendra McSweeney Office: 1164 Derby Hall; Office tel.: 247-6400 E-mail: email protected Office hours: Thursday 1:00-3:00, or by appointment Lectures Mon.

, 9:00-10:18 DB 1080 Labs Fridays, DB 1080 (#10187-6) DB 1080 (#10188-1) TA 8:30-9:48 2:30-3:48 Fletcher Chmara-Huff Office: Derby Hall 1155; Office tel.: 292-2704 E-mail: email protected Office hours: Fridays 10:00-2:00, or by appointment Overview This course provides an understanding of contemporary environmental issues, as viewed from the integrative field of geography.Geographers have long studied the relationship between people and the natural environment, from the fundamental biophysical processes upon which human existence depends, to humanity’s role in transforming nature.In this course, students are introduced to basic aspects of physical geography, which are applied to examine critical global environmental concerns.Topics range from global-scale processes such as climate change, to the local-scale impacts of 205 water pollution.

In each case, the nature and scope of the problem is reviewed, its underlying mechanisms outlined, and ongoing efforts to resolve the problem are explored.Particular attention is paid to how specific environmental issues are manifest in Ohio.After taking this course, students should: better understand the basic processes underlying important types of environmental change at local, regional, and global scales; grasp how geographers approach environmental science, assessment, and problem-solving; be able to critically assess multi-media coverage of these issues; and better identify the links between everyday consumption choices and environmental outcomes.This course serves as the first required core course in the Environment and Society track for the B.in Geography, and/or as a Natural Science elective 1 for the University’s General Education Curriculum (for non-Science majors only).Course Organization The course is structured around two weekly lectures and one weekly lab.Chapters from the textbook are assigned weekly (be aware that we will not be reading the chapters in order) and should be completed in preparation for the Friday lab .Please bring your texts to lab with you.Weekly labs allow students to review, apply, and explore in detail material presented in lectures.

Students are responsible for any new material presented in labs.Teamwork is encouraged during lab time, but grading is based on the quality of individual work and individual participation.Class and lab attendance is critical to success in this course .Students may only attend the lab section in which they are registered.Students are expected to prepare for, and attend, all weekly lab sessions.

Students will be advised in advance when labs involve trips outside of the classroom.Most labs will require calculator, ruler, and textbook.The lowest lab score will not be used in calculating the final grade.Required Text Chapters will be assigned weekly from: Physical Geography: Environmental Issues.The text is available at OSU Bookstores (Barnes & Noble and Central Classroom) for : $66.Note: This is a black-and-white custom textbook composed of selections from two larger textbooks: -Botkin & Keller.

ISBN: 0-471-48816-X -Strahler & Strahler.Both of these texts are on 3-hour reserve in the Science and Engineering Library.Mid-quarter in-lab exam Final exam (cumulative) Lab assignments (7 at 5% each)* 25% 35% 35% Overall attendance/participation Friday, April 25 Monday, June 2 due in lab 5% * Note: your lowest lab score is not considered in the final calculation of your grade.206 Letter Grade Conversion A: 95% and above; A-: 90-94.Policies Students who anticipate missing an exam must see the Instructor at least one week prior to make alternative arrangements.In-class evaluation cannot be made up without special advance notice and is done at the discretion of the instructor.

Exam absences due to illness must be substantiated by a written note from a health care provider.Students who miss lectures or labs due to illness are encouraged to borrow class notes from others, to attend all review sessions, and to meet with the TA or instructor to review missed topics.All labs must be completed, and submitted, during the lab period.Labs may not be completed prior to, or subsequent to, the assigned lab time.

Under exceptional circumstances, and at the discretion of the instructor, extra credit opportunities are available.Academic Misconduct It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( /info for students/ ).

Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; /.207 SCHEDULE Class Topics, Required Readings, and Labs (Subject to Change) Note: “S&S” refers to the first section of the text, authored by Strahler and Strahler “B&K” refers to the second section of the text, authored by Botkin and Keller Week Dates 1 March 24-28 2 March 31April 4 3 Topics Environmental challenges; geographical concepts Is population the environmental problem? April 7-11 4 5 6 Readings S & S: Ch.1 Food, land use, agriculture; energy flow; biogeochemical cycles April 14-18 Energy I: basics, consumption patterns April 21-25 Energy II: Global warming; carbon cycle; review for exam April 28-May 2 Energy III: Alternative energies 7 May 5-9 8 May 12-16 9 10 May 19-23 May 26-30 Forests and biodiversity Lab #1: Environmental issues and You B & K: Chs.1, 4 #2: Population Dynamics and Ecological footprinting B & K: Chs 9, 11, 12 #3: An Ohio agroecosystem B & K: Chs 5, 16, 17 B & K: Chs 5, 22 S & S: Chs 2, 3 B& K: Chs 18, 19 B& K: Chs 7, 8, 13 S & S: Ch.

15 Water I: supply, use, management; hydrologic cycle Water II: quality S & S: Ch.15 M: Memorial Day: no class No readings W: Summary M June 2 Mid-quarter EXAM in Friday lab time #8: FIELD TRIP: Olentangy Wetlands #9: Fifth Ave dam #10: Review for final exam FINAL EXAM 7:30-9:18 DB 1080 Graduating seniors’ grades posted All other grades posted Th June 5 M June 9 1 #4: Your carbon footprint #5: MID-QUARTER EXAM #6: Alternative transportation in Ohio: Guest speaker #7: A Forest Returns Evaluation NATURAL SCIENCE GEC Goals/Rationale: Courses in natural sciences foster an understanding of the principles, theories and methods of modern science, the relationship between science and technology, and the effects of science and technology on the environment.Students understand the basic facts, principles, theories and methods of modern science.

Students learn key events in the history of science.Students provide examples of the inter-dependence of scientific and technological developments.Students discuss social and philosophical implications of scientific discoveries and understand the potential of science and technology to address problems of the contemporary world.208 GEOGRAPHY 420 Global Climate Change: Causes and Consequences 5 credits, no prerequisites Instructor: Dr.Bryan Mark Office: 1136 Derby Hall Email: email protected Phone: 247-6180 Office hours: W, R 10:30-11:30 am, or by appointment Textbook: Our Changing Planet: An Introduction to Earth System Science, 3 rd Edition, by Fred T.Mackenzie Course Objectives The substantive material covered in this course requires that students attain knowledge from the physical sciences.Understanding the drivers of global climate and environmental change requires knowledge of the Earth system, its climate, the mechanisms that force climate, the human activities that affect the magnitude and direction of some of these forcing mechanisms, the economic drivers of human activities and consideration of the social, political, economic and physical forces that govern present and future human actions and choices regarding resource use.

This course meets GEC requirements in one area - Natural Science, Physical Science In the Natural Sciences: It is impossible to understand global climate and environmental changes without knowledge of the physical, chemical and biological processes that shape the Earth System.The course includes lectures on the Earth’s energy balance, the movement of energy and mass by the atmosphere and ocean, the hydrologic cycle, air pollution and the nature of both renewable and non-renewable energy sources.This course will require your full participation if you expect to do well.In order for you to take full advantage of the opportunities in this course and demonstrate that you have done so, I expect the following: • Attentive and active participation in class discussions and activities; • Thoughtful and timely reading of assigned materials; • Completion of each short paper on time; • Demonstration of critical thinking and an ability to integrate and synthesize diverse facts and ideas of the scientific and human-influenced processes underlying environmental change at different scales (local, regional and global); geographic perspectives on environmental issues; 209 • Open-minded, critical consideration of diverse viewpoints about human uses of natural resources and their consequences.Evaluation Student evaluation will be based on a combination of the following: • • Short papers: Presentation/Debates: 20% = 100 points 20% = 100 points • • Mid Term: Final 25% = 125 points 35% = 175 points • Total Points: 100%=500 points Course Policies Student Code of Conduct webpage: /resource .

You are expected to adhere to all policies listed.Disability Statement Students with physical or learning disabilities requiring alternative accommodations for completing course requirements must make these arrangements in consultation with the University Office of Disability Services (150 Pomerene Hall, 2-3307) and the instructor at the beginning of the quarter.Students who anticipate missing an exam must make arrangements with the instructor at least one week prior.Furthermore, no in-class activity or exam can be made up without special advanced notice, given at the instructor’s discretion.Documentation will be required for an excused absence.

210 Topics Part I: The Earth System Week 1 • Introduction: What is Global Environmental Change? • Basic Physiology of the Earth o discussion of Physical Geography and Earth System Science (ESS) and application of these conceptual frameworks to conduct local to global-scale analyses of past, present and future climate and environmental change o system equilibrium, thresholds and feedbacks (e.climatebiosphere) o discussion of how the interaction of human systems with these spheres is increasingly important o Reading: The Lithosphere, Chapter 1 (Mackenzie) Week 2 • Putting Environmental Change in Context: What can geologic, paleoecologic and historic records tell us? o discussion of phenomena (biological, physical, chemical) that are dependent on climate, i.use of proxy records to reconstruct climate and environmental change o discussion of global and regional climate models o identify mechanisms responsible for and causes of past climate change and feedbacks present in Earth-Atmosphere System (EAS) o Reading: Chapter 11 (Mackenzie) • Scales of variability (annual – orbital) o annual, decadal, centennial, millennial; acknowledge that societal focus on annual and decadal variation o discussion of multiple stable states/solutions (non-unique climate state) given a set of boundary conditions – Lorenz and Chaos Theory Evaluation: Students will research, synthesize and write a paper describing a method (history of scientific techniques, technologic interdependence, etc.

This exercise will provide insight to the operation of earth’s atmospheric system and its complexity.A short presentation utilizing power point will be made.50 points Part II: Human Dimension(s) of Global Change Week 3 • Human Population Growth and Environmental Change • Understanding demographic transition models • Evaluating the earth’s carrying capacity and sustainability 211 • Reading: Chapter 7 (Mackenzie) Week 4 • Land Degradation and Land Use: land conversion issues (forestry, agriculture, ranching, fisheries and aquaculture), effects of land conversion activities (soil erosion, biomass burning, use of pesticides), biodiversity o Discussion of habitat destruction, fragmentation and conversion o Biodiversity hotspots – endemic species role of human activity and extinction o International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) – Red Books o Biodiversity conservation: species richness, habitat and/or ecosystem foci o Impact to energy balance o Ecosystem dynamics in relation to carrying capacity and biochemical cycling o Technological methods used to detect change in the natural environment o Reading: Chapter 8 (Mackenzie) Week 5 • Global Warming (natural climatic variability, greenhouse gases, oceans and ice cores, consequences).o Global warming causes and consequences o two issues: rate of warming and fragmentation o response of biomes to projected warming o shifts ecotonal environments such tree line/timberline o changes in natural fire frequencies o nature reserve design o Reading: Chapter 11 (Mackenzie) Evaluation: Mid-term exam covering the EAS, land-use change, population growth and global warming.

These topics relate to knowledge and understanding of the earth and natural universe.125 points Week 6 • Atmospheric Chemistry: ozone depletion and acid deposition o Acid Deposition Review causes and effects o Ozone Focus Study Vienna Convention (1985) Montreal Protocol (1987) London Agreement (1990) 212 Copenhagen Amendment (1992) Reading: Chapter 10 (Mackenzie) Case Study: Discovery of the ozone hole Evaluation: Students will research, synthesize and write a paper describing a specific human dimension of environmental change; e.nature reserve design, fisheries collapse, timber extraction, drought mitigation.A short presentation utilizing power point will also be made.

50 points Week 7 • Hydrologic Cycle: o discussion of various components: ocean evaporation and precipitation; terrestrial precipitation and evapotranspiration, reservoirs (ice, ground water), runoff and residence time o case studies: groundwater marine pollution, terrestrial/marine linkages, ENSO, sea level rise, freshwater eutrophication, desalinization o Reading: Chapter 3 (Mackenzie) o Field trip: Olentangy River 5th Avenue dam Part III: Global Change Science, Society and Policy Week 8 • IPCC (Intergovernmental Report on Climate Change) which demonstrates the scientific process and process of scientific consensus, The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment Report, Arctic Climate Impact Assessment: outcomes and effectiveness • Reading: IPCC Week 9 • Alternative energy sources – nuclear, wind power generation, solar thermal and photovoltaic (supplemental readings: Appenzeller, Deffeyes, and Weaver) • Approaches to limiting C-emission (Cap-and-Trade, C sequestration, reforestation, carbon tax, international, regional and local agreements) etc).• Utilization of the principles of the first and second laws of thermodynamics, including the first and second laws of efficiency.We will also employ climate circulation modeling; specifically limits of computing resolution and uncertainty.Evaluation: Students will form groups of 3-4 and debate propositions outlined in “Debate Topics” appendix.This exercise stresses students’ 213 ability to present scientific evidence and interdependence of experiment and theory 100 points Week 10 • Projections: what does the future hold o sea-level rise (thermal expansion, change in terrestrially-held water) o soil-moisture (Palmer’s drought severity index), agricultural productivity o changes in phenology (National Phenology Network) o frequency and magnitude of severe weather o epidemiology of vector-borne disease o Readings: Chapter 12 (Mackenzie) and IPCC o Evaluation: Final exam covering Human dimensions of environmental change and global change science and its relationship to society and policy.

175 points Supplemental Readings Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis One Planet Many People, Atlas of Our Changing Environment /OnePlanetManyPeople/ The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment /en/ AAAS Atlas of Population & Environment / Appenzeller, T.Blue Gold: The Fight to Stop the Corporate Theft of the World’s Water.Princeton University Press: Princeton, NJ.The Human Impact on the Natural Environment.Water Contract Renewals Stir Debate Between Environmentalists and Farmers in California.Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water.Special report on energy: our energy predicament.The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money and Power.Debate Topics Vehicles powered by corn-based ethanol are good for the environment and should be promoted.Pro: They are good for the environment due to lower emission Con: They are bad for the environment due to environmental footprint of corn production Nuclear power plants are on balance harmful to the environment and should not be built.Pro: They are harmful because they produce nuclear waste Con: They are helpful since the only emit steam from their smoke stacks The best way to mitigate carbon emissions is with a Cap and Trade system.Pro: Cap and trade is the best Con: Strict cap is the best Con: Incentives is the best 215 A price should be put on the goods and services provided by the world’s ecosystem.

Pro: Everyone should pay the “true” value of a commodity, including its environmental costs.Con: All commodities will be too expensive to afford, causing an economic disaster The US should reprocess spent nuclear fuel.Pro: nuclear waste should be used as many times as possible before it is placed in Yucca Mountain Con: the hazards involved in the reprocessing have the potential to cause a major environmental disaster.California’s proposed conventional light bulb ban should become law.Pro: more efficient light bulb use can prevent millions of tons of CO2 from entering our atmosphere.

Con: Compact Fluorescent Light bulbs are very environmentally harmful during construction.Geography 430 Autumn 2007 M-W 10:30-12:18 1116 Derby Hall Geographical Perspectives on Environment and Society Professor: Becky Mansfield Email: email protected Phone: 247-7264 (on campus: 7-7264) Office: 1160 Derby Hall Office hours: Directly after class, or by appointment for other times Are humans separate from nature, or are they a part of it? Can humans ultimately control the natural world, or does the natural world determine the course of human history? Are some groups of people “closer to nature” than others? Is the earth made for humans to use? Is nature socially constructed? Does solving environmental problems require that we change how we think about nature? How do ideas about nature reflect and influence our ideas about other people, including ideas about race and gender? These are longstanding questions not only in Geography and Environmental Studies but in a variety of other fields, from Philosophy to Ecology.This course will focus on how geographers 216 have understood human-nature relations, and we will also examine how others—policy makers, historians, environmentalists—have thought about this relationship.We will look at how people have thought about nature in different times and circumstances (mainly in the US and Europe over the past 150 years), and how that influences people’s actions toward the environment and other people.The goal of the course is to introduce students to key concepts and recurring themes in these enduring debates, while helping them identify and understand the importance of human-nature relations in contemporary life.

This course meets the requirements of the GEC for Social Sciences: Human, Natural, and Economic Resources.The goal and rationale of the Social Science GEC is to help students understand human behavior and cognition, and the structures of human societies, cultures, and institutions.There are three central learning objectives of this GEC: 1.to understand the theories and methods of scientific inquiry as they are applied to the studies of individuals, groups, organizations, and societies 2.to comprehend human differences and similarities in various psychological, social, cultural, economic, geographic, and political contexts 3.

to develop abilities to comprehend and assess individual and social values, and recognize their importance in social problem solving and policy making This course meets these goals and objectives by examining the relationship between human behavior, cognition, and society, on the one hand, and the natural world, on the other.In so doing, we will explicitly examine human differences and similarities, as well as individual and social values.We will stress the importance of different contexts for altering the environment-society relationship and how we perceive it, and we will be examining how perceptions of environment and society impact social and environmental problem solving.We will also be learning about different methodological approaches for understanding human-nature relations.Course format: Because the course is small, it will be run more like a seminar than a lecture course.

This means that class will be based primarily on discussion and other activities that require active involvement of all students.As a result, students are also expected to do all assigned readings before class.Readings: • There is no single text for this course.The readings include a variety of articles and book chapters, drawn from multiple sources.Readings are all available through Carmen.

• You will need to buy or borrow from a library a book to review (for Project 2).A list of choices will be given later in the term.Course requirements: Attendance and participation Midterm Project 1 20% 20% 20% 217 Project 2 Final 20% 20% Attendance and participation are required and will be graded.Talking with me outside of class about course material counts as participation.

The midterm exam will be inclass, closed book, and will cover all material presented up to the day before the exam.

Each of the projects requires you to write a short essay in which you identify and explain ideas about environment and society.These assignments help you learn to interpret and evaluate ideas about environment and society that are present in everyday life.For project one, you will identify ideas about nature and society in everyday objects such as advertisements or song lyrics.Project two is a book review (I will provide a list of books from which to choose).I will provide more detailed assignments later in the term.

Although the final exam is cumulative, it will emphasize material presented since the midterm.Course policies: Grading policies: • • • • • • Participation is based on attendance.If you are regularly absent, your participation grade will reflect your absences, even if you participate well on the days you do attend.Exams can only be made up if you have an emergency such as a medical problem or death in the family.You will need to document the emergency.

Late projects will lose one point (out of 20) for every day they are late.To avoid losing points, you must make arrangements AHEAD OF TIME.I will try to accommodate religious obligations, so please talk to me if these interfere with completing assignments or exams as scheduled.To pass the course: o You must receive a total grade of at least 55%.

o You must complete all the assignments.Regardless of how well you do on other parts of the course, you will not pass the course if you miss an exam or fail to turn in a project.PLEASE SEE ME if you are having problems that prevent you from meeting this requirement; we may be able to make alternative arrangements.Grading scale: 93-100 A; 90-92 A-; 87-89 B+; 83-86 B; 80-82 B-; 77-79 C+; 73-76 C; 70-72 C-; 67-69 D+; 55-66 D (I will use the rules of rounding: < .) Academic Misconduct: Cheating and plagiarism will not be tolerated.Plagiarism is defined as using another person's ideas without acknowledging from where the idea came.Plagiarism ranges from direct copying of someone else's work to presenting someone else's ideas as though they are yours.Please use citations to differentiate between your ideas and those you got from other sources (such as books and articles).

218 Students agree that by taking this course all required papers may be subject to submission for textual similarity review to for the detection of plagiarism.All submitted papers will be included as source documents in the reference database solely for the purpose of detecting plagiarism of such papers.Use of the service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the site.Any student suspected of cheating or plagiarism will be reported to the Committee on Academic Misconduct.It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.

The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( /info for students/ ).Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; /.

219 Schedule of topics, readings, and assignments Note: SN refers to the course text, Social Nature Sept 19: Introduction: Worldviews, Placing Humans and Nature Sept 24: History of Human-Nature Relations, Domination of Nature Read: Glacken (1967); Marsh (1864) Sept 26: Dualism between Humans and Nature Read: Merchant (1992) Oct 1: Dualism: Primitive and Civilized People Read: Soper (1995); Gregory (2001); Benton and Short (“Invented Indian”) (1999) Oct 3: Environmental Determinism DUE: PROJECT 1 Read: Semple (1911) Oct 8: Human Agency: The Cultural Landscape Read: Sauer (1925); Rose (1992) Oct 10: Cultural Ecology Read: Robbins (“Cultural ecology”) (2004); Rappaport (1967) Oct 15: Preservation Read: Benton and Short (“No Holier Temple”) (1999); Runte (1979); Muir (1901); Oct 17: Conservation Read: Roosevelt (1901); Pinchot (1910); Leopold (1949) Oct 22: MIDTERM EXAM Oct 24: Modern Environmentalism Read: Dowie (“Earth Days”) (1996); Sauer (1956); Carson (1962); Boulding (1966) Oct 29: Population and Consumption Debates Read: Ehrlich (1969); Castree (“Ideologies of nature”) (2001); Gardner, Assadourian, and Sarin (2004) Oct 31: Reformist approaches Read: Dowie (“Culture of Reform”) (1996); Earth Works Group (1989); WCED (1987); The Ecologist (1993); Anderson and Leal (2001) 220 Nov 5: Radical Approaches Read: Devall and Sessions (1985); Seager (1993) Nov 7: Social Construction of Nature Read: Demeritt (2001) Nov 12: No class, Veteran’s Day observed Nov 14: Wilderness Debates Read: Cronon (1995) Nov 19: Marxism and “Second Nature” Read: Castree (“Remaking nature”) (2001) DUE: PROJECT 2 Nov 21: Political Ecology Read: Robbins (“The hatchet and the seed,” “A field crystallizes”) (2004) Nov 26: Natural Hazards, Vulnerability, and Environmental Justice Read: Wisner (2005); Gibbs (1993); Bullard (2002) Nov 28: Hazards/Vulnerability/Justice case study: Video Dec 5: (Wednesday) 7:30-9:18 FINAL EXAM GEOGRAPHY 490 Introduction to Biogeography Autumn 2007 This course will present an integrated study of past, present and likely future distribution of Earth’s biological diversity.The distribution of flora and fauna through space and time at multiple spatial and temporal scales will be discussed.We will be concerned with identifying how abiotic factors such as soils, climate and topography affect the geographic and spatial distribution of individuals, species, ecosystems and biomes.Additionally, we will discuss how biotic and historical factors have influenced the past and present distribution of organisms.We will also focus on how human modification of the Earth Atmosphere System (EAS) has impacted Earth’s biota and what approaches are being taken to aid in understanding and conserving endangered and threatened species and biodiversity.

12:30 2:18 pm Location: Derby Hall (DB) 0155D Instructor: Dr.David Porinchu Office: 1128 Derby Hall 221 Phone: 247-2614 Email: email protected Office Hours: Monday and Wednesday, 3:30 – 5:00 p.Course Format/Structure: This will primarily be a lecture-based course.

However, a significant component of the class will involve group discussions.These discussions will require active student involvement.Additionally, in-class assignments and labs will provide students with hands-on experience.Paleoenvironmental Lab, will cover topics and methods that supplement the lecture material.Students will be expected to complete a term paper focusing on a biogeographic topic to be determined in consultation with the instructor.Guidelines for writing term papers will be made available early in the quarter.Students will also make a short presentation on a biome of their choice.Students are strongly encouraged to attend all lectures and obtain notes for those lectures that they may have missed.

A make-up exam is possible in the event of a documented emergency or through prior consent of the instructor.Academic Misconduct It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( /info for students/ ) .

Disability Statement Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; ate.Reading Materials: The primary source of material for this course will be the following textbook: MacDonald, G.Additional readings will be assigned on a weekly basis.An abbreviated list of these readings can be found following the lecture-reading outline.

Evaluation: Biome presentation and write-up 10 % Mid-term exam 25 % Term paper 30 % Term paper presentation 5 % Lab exercise 10 % Participation 10 % Reading responses 10 % Course Lecture-Reading Outline (subject to change) Week 1 Introduction: review of hierarchies (taxonomic, ecologic and trophic), and physical geography basics (global climate, microclimate and soils).Additional topics include introduction to 222 gradients of diversity and how many species exist.Chapters 1,2; Diamond, 1987; May, 1988 Week 2 Discussion of how abiotic factors such as light, temperature and moisture control the distribution of biota.Environmental gradients and the concept of species’ niches will also be introduced.Additional topics include discussion of other physical factors and the interaction of abiotic factors on geographical distributions.

Chapter 3; Jansen, 1967; Stevens, 1992; Gaston et al., 1998 Week 3 Discussion of how biotic factors such as predation, competition and symbiosis affect species interactions and community composition.The combined effects of biotic and abiotic factors on biodiversity will be discussed.Additional topics include discussion of ecosystems and biodiversity and biotic assemblages on a global scale., 2005 Week 4 Presentation and student-led discussion of community formations and biomes Chapter 6; plus additional readings .Week 5 Discussion of major forms of disturbance, including fire, flooding and wind.Additional physical disturbances such as avalanches, volcanic eruptions and pathogens will also be reviewed.Chapter 5; Swetnam, 1993; Wootton, 1998 .

Week 6 Discussion of life and the geologic timescale, plate tectonics and Quaternary climate change.Additional topics will include climatic relicts, early spread of mammals, the Cretaceous extinction event and the rise of flowering plants.Chapter 7; Erwin, 2001; Steadman and Martin, 2003 Week 7 Discussion of dispersal, colonization and invasion and the role of geography in evolutionary processes.Additional topics include Darwin’s theory of evolution through natural selection, Darwin’s finches, controversies associated with evolutionary theory, evolution and human race(s) and Social Darwinism.Chapters 8, 9; Gould and Eldredge, 1993; Grant and Grant, 2003 Week 8 The role of humans as a factor in evolution and extinction.

Specific reference will be made to: animal and plant domestication, the spread of agriculture and pre-historic and historic extinctions.Additional topics will include the role of humans in mega-faunal extinctions and the environmental impact of early human cultures.Chapters 11, 12; Martin, 1973; Barnosky et al., 2004; Pennisi, 2004 Week 9 Discussion of the relationship between geography, biodiversity and conservation.Further discussion will focus on understanding how a geographical perspective can inform strategies for species conservation and biodiversity conservation.

Additional topics include Island Biogeography, the biogeographical consequences of global climate change, design of nature reserves, habitat restoration and conservation and biodiversity hotspots.Chapters 14, 15; Diamond, 1975; Soule, 1985; Meadows, 2001; Myers, 2003 Week 10 Students will present their term paper topics and lead discussion.Assessing the causes of Late Pleistocene extinctions on the continents.Better safe than sorry? The precautionary principle and biodiversity Conservation.Biogeography: An ecological and evolutionary approach.

The island dilemma: Lessons of modern biogeographic studies for the design of natural reserves.Extant unless proven extinct? Or, Extinct unless proven extant? Conservation Biology 1: 77-79.Lessons from the past: Biotic recoveries from mass extinctions.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 98: 5399-5403.Rapoport's rule: time for an epitaph? Trends in Ecology and Evolution 13: 70-74.What Darwin's finches can teach us about the evolutionary origin and regulation of biodiversity.A biogeographical approach to plant invasions: the importance of studying exotics in their introduced and native range.

Why mountain passes are higher in the tropics.

Creating a science of nature reserve design: Perspectives from history.Environmental Modeling and Assessment 7: 61–69.

Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, MA.Geographical Ecology: Patterns in the Distribution of Species.How many species are there on Earth? Science 358: 278-279.

Biogeography: does theory meet practice? Progress in Physical Geography 25: 134–142.Conservation where people live and work.Wilderness and biodiversity conservation.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 100: 1030910313.

The biodiversity challenge: expanded hot-spot analysis.Ice ages may explain ancient bison’s boom-bust history.Golden eagles, feral pigs, and insular carnivores: How exotic species turn native predators into prey.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 99: 791-796.

Extinction of an island forest avifauna by an introduced snake.

Refuge design and island biogeographic theory: effects of fragmentation.30, National Academy of Sciences: Washington, D.What is conservation biology? Bioscience 35: 727-734.

The late Quaternary extinction and future resurrection of birds on Pacific islands.Fire history and climate-change in giant sequoia groves.Society for the Bibliography of Natural History, Sherborn Fund Facsimilies No.“Summary of the distribution, and lines of migration, of the several classes of animals” in, The Geographical Distribution of Animals.

Island Life: Or, the Phenomena and Causes of Insular Faunas and Floras.

Effects of disturbance on species diversity: a multi-trophic perspective.02: Integrated Earth Systems: Confronting Global Change WINTER, 2007 Lecture: Derby Hall 1080: 9:00 - 10:18 a.: Tuesday and Thursday Recitation: Derby Hall 140 (in basement): Thursday (10:30 - 11:48 am) Professor: Dr.Ellen Mosley-Thompson ( email protected ) Office: Derby Hall 1140; Telephone: 292-6662 or 292-2580 Office Hours: Tuesday and Thursday: 10:15 to noon or by appointment Graduate Teaching Assistant: Karin Bumbaco Office: 1145 Derby Hall (ph: 292-6127); email: email protected Office hours: Tuesday: 9:30 to 11:30 am and Friday 9:30 to 11:30 am; or by appointment Course Objectives: This course is taught in a lecture / recitation format and is designed to provide a basic understanding of both natural and anthropogenic (human produced) climate change.You will explore the key issues surrounding 20 th century climate change (including global warming and sea level rise) and the role of human activities in shaping the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the environment that sustains life on Earth.Lectures will provide an introduction to the mechanisms that control the Earth’s climate regimes, basics of ecosystems interactions, and actions to help ensure sustainable supplies of water, energy, clean air, soils and food for the Earth’s growing population.A key objective is to provide you with the knowledge base and skills to critically evaluate information you read or hear concerning climate change, global warming and related environmental issues.

Textbook and Recitation Materials (required): Note this text was used in 2005 so you may be able to find it used.Wadsworth Publishers, 2007 (8 th Edition) 225 (2) The lecture syllabus, the recitation syllabus, your recitation exercises, computer tutorials and additional required reference materials will be available at the appropriate time on the class web page.

You merely visit the class web page and print them at your convenience.I suggest that you bookmark the class web page in your internet browser.02/ If you have trouble getting to the web page by typing this in - log into the Geography Dept.web page and from here click onto the classes and then on 597.

Throughout the quarter additional reading and reference materials may be required.ALL reference materials (unless otherwise noted) will be placed on closed reserve in the Geology Library in Orton Hall the building with the bell tower on the south side the Oval .The materials will be filed under Geography 597.Please Note: To be allowed to make up work or tests you must have a written note from your physician.Quizzes WILL NOT be available for makeup as they are given impromptu and answers are posted on the class web page virtually immediately.The lowest quiz score will be dropped so you can miss one quiz without affecting your grade.226 Important additional resources for this class: 1) /biology/miller From this page select your text book and select “Companion Site” under Students.This web site offers tutorials, quizzes, etc.

Also you may have access to Info Track (see below) if you bought your book new and with Info Track bundled.2) Info Trac - this is a free online library available to you for 4 months after you activate it with the information provided with your textbook.Info Trac links you to many scientific articles related to the topics that you will cover in the textbook.To activate your follow the instructions that came with your textbook.Please see page “x” of your book for more details about the online study aids that are available.

With regard to Info-Track resources, some of the publications are dated (meaning more than 2 years old).In climate change studies, our knowledge advances so rapidly that the results in a 2 year-old publication could possibly be obsolete.I will include links on the class web page to a few key papers in the peer-reviewed literature on the topics we will be covering throughout the quarter.You will be alerted as these materials are posted.Weekly topics and reading assignments: Week 1: January 3 (Wed) Topic 1: Key environmental issues facing us in the 21 st Century: An overview.

Key questions to be addressed include: What are Global Climate and Environmental Change (GCEC)? What is up with all the talk about global warming, climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, and rising sea levels? In this course you will explore the many processes that are changing your environment.You will learn about other disruptions in the Earth system and consider why human resource usage is a critical driver of climate, social, political and economic changes.A ssigned Reading: Pages 1-4, Chapter 1 (all), Chapter 2 (pp.20-28) Week 2: January 8 (Monday) and January 10 (Wed) and Week 3: Jan 17 (Wed) Topic 2: The Earth as a System; Key questions to be addressed include: What has been the Earth's climate history? How does the Earth system work? How does the Earth stay warm? What is the natural Greenhouse Effect (GHE)? What is the enhanced Greenhouse Effect? What is the role of human activity in the enhancement of the GHE? Assigned Reading: Chapter 12 (pp.252254; 266-282); Also assigned is the Chapter entitled “Solar and Terrestrial Radiation” in the book “The Atmosphere” by Lutgens and Tarbuck.

This paper is on electronic reserve through Carmen.Several copies of earlier editions of this book are on reserve in the Geology Library (Orton Hall).I also strongly recommend that you review the chapter entitled “Global circulation” in Edition 5 and “Circulation of the Atmosphere” in Edition 6 of the same book.This chapter is also available on the Electronic Reserves through Carmen.

This augments the chapter on climate in your text that is deficient in some important concepts.

For information about the Earth’s climate history you should rely heavily on the information presented in the lectures.Note that Monday Jan 15 is MLK day (no class).Week 4: January 22 (Mon) and 24 (Wed); Topic 3: Earth’s Ecosystems: The Basics.Key questions to be addressed include: What are ecosystems? How do they function? What practical lessons can we learn from studying ecosystems? What is their role in the carbon cycle? Assigned Reading: Chapter 2 (pp.28-51); Chapter 3 (all); Chapter 4 (all) 227 Week 5: January 29 (Mon) and 31 (Wed); Topic 4: Ecology, deforestation, sustainability (approaches to sustaining biodiversity).

Assigned Reading: Chapter 6 (all); Chapter 7 (all) Week 6: Feb 5 (Monday) Mid-Term examination: bring pencil, eraser Week 6: Feb 7 (Wed) Topic 5: Human population and dynamics.Critical questions to be addressed include: Why is it important to understand population dynamics and human population growth? What are the basic characteristics of all populations? What dynamics drive human population growth and decline? Assigned Reading: Chapter 5 (all) Week 7: February 12 (Mon) and 14 (Wed) Topic 6: Energy for Planet Earth.Questions to be addressed include: What are the primary renewable and non-renewable Earth resources? Why is their allocation and use so important? Can we use resources more efficiently? How? Assigned Reading: Chapter 10 (all) Week 8: February 19 (Mon) and 21 (Wed); Topic 7: Water for Planet Earth.Questions to be addressed include: Have you considered the quality of the water you drink? What is the hydrologic cycle? How is water distributed and used? Assigned Reading: Chapter 9 (all) Week 9: Feb 26 (Mon) Topic 8: The Air You Breathe.Questions to be addressed include: What is the quality of the air you breathe? What are the health effects from air pollution? Assigned Reading: Chapter 12 (pp.

255-266); Feb 28 (Wed) Topic 9: Food and Soil.Questions to be addressed include: How are we going to feed the growing world population? How severe is the degradation of the Earth's soils? Is the use of pesticides creating a problem? What will be the long-term impact upon the ability of the Earth to feed its growing population? Assigned Reading: Chapter 8 (all) and review Chapter 2 (pp.41-43) Week 10: March 5 (Mon) and Mar 7 (Wed) Topic 10: Sustaining your environment.Questions to be addressed include: How can economies grow without depleting critical resources? What is the Kyoto Protocol and is it important? What are the different world views and are they sustainable? What is sustainability? Does it mean the same thing to everyone? Can it be achieved? How can you as an individual make a difference? Assigned Reading: Chapter 14 (all) Final examination: Monday Mar 12 from 7:30 to 9:18 a.in Derby 1080 Grading: Mid-term exam: 25% Recitation exercises: 25% Final exam: 25% Final Project: 15% Quizzes: 5% There will be 6 to 8 impromptu quizzes; some will be at the beginning of lecture, some at the beginning of recitation (so be on time).Participation: 5% Attendance will be taken by Ms.You are allowed 2 unexcused absences from either lecture or recitation; after that you will lose participation points for each unexcused absence from class.

228 NOTE: Throughout the quarter there may be a few special lectures to attend for "extra quiz credit.This will be due before the end of the quarter and more details will be forthcoming during the recitation session in the third week of the quarter.Additional Class Materials: Additional materials will be placed on reserve throughout the quarter.The list of these will be maintained on the class web page under Reserve Materials.

All materials (unless otherwise indicated) are on closed reserve in the Geology Library in Orton Hall the building with the bell tower on the south side the Oval .All materials will be filed under Geography G597.Other class related materials will be made available at the appropriate time, either from the class web page or in a binder that will be placed on reserve in Orton Library.Some material will be made available by electronic reserves that are now accessed through Carmen.

You will be informed in class and by email regarding the location of any ancillary class materials.An Important Note about Plagiarism and Academic Misconduct: Plagiarism and other forms of cheating will not be tolerated.Please see the Code of Student Conduct ( /resource ) .University rules provide severe penalties for academic misconduct, ranging from course failure to dismissal from the university.University rules are found in the handbook used in all survey courses: “University Survey - A Guidebook and Readings for New Students.

” Any questions about this policy, or your grade, should be brought directly to the attention of Dr.Students with Disabilities and Special Needs: Any student needing special accommodation on the basis of any disability must advise the instructor at the beginning of class.All necessary accommodations will be made upon presentation of relevant certification, presented in a timely manner.Students are also responsible for making contact with the Office for Disability Services at 292-3307, 150 Pomerene Hall, prior to or at the beginning of the quarter.

I look forward to working with you as a group and individually as you learn more about your environment and the Earth’s climate system - past, present and future.Geography 605 Changing Geographies of Latin America (Special Problems in the Geography of Latin America) Instructor: Dr.Kendra McSweeney Office: 1164 Derby Hall E-mail: email protected Phone: 247-6400 Office hours: Th 1:00-3:00, or by appointment 229 Class: MW, 3:00-4:48, Derby Hall 1116 Call No.: 10112-0 L, 5 credits Overview Why does Latin America have the world’s greatest disparity between rich and poor? Why are Latin America’s tropical forests—among the world’s most biodiverse—disappearing in some places and regrowing in others? Why has urbanization occurred at such a dramatic pace? Why does violence so often flare up in the Latin American countryside? What motivates the millions of Latin Americans who head for the U.every year? How are our lives connected to theirs, and how do our actions influence their well-being? The purpose of this course is to address these questions, and to use geographers’ integrative perspective to understand why these processes are deeply interrelated, and how they shape the social, environmental and political character of landscapes across Latin America.With an emphasis on case studies and personal narratives from the tropical regions of Central and South America, we will explore ongoing debates about the best paths to socially equitable and environmentally sustainable development in Latin America.Emphasis will be placed on the contributions that geographers have made to these issues.There are no prerequisites for this course, and no prior knowledge of Latin America is expected.

Course Format This course meets twice a week, and will be run as a seminar, combining brief lectures with student-led group discussion.

Critical and interesting class discussion requires that you come to class with the readings completed.Readings are diverse, and combine theory, case studies, and personal narratives in order to provide both a general understanding of the issues and a sense of how they play out in particular places in particular ways.To help you stay on top of the readings and to structure discussion, all students will send *brief* but substantive questions/comments on the readings by noon on the day of each class (each Monday and Wednesday).There are two ways you can do this: either upload a file of your comments to the appropriate folder in the Carmen course dropbox (preferred), or send me your comments in the body of an email.Required Readings There are three required texts.

One is a course pack, produced by Zip Publishing, in which the bulk of readings are compiled: 1) Geography 605 Reader.(Questions or other purchase options? Contact Zip Publishing at: email protected , ).One backup copy of the reader is available on 3-hour reserve in Sullivant Library for emergency use only.

Please bring the coursepack to ALL class meetings, as we will refer to readings and figures frequently.The other two required texts, available at OSU Barnes & Nobles/Long’s Bookstore on High St.Don’t Be Afraid, Gringo: A Honduran Woman Speaks from the Heart (The Story of Elvia Alvarado).

Also available from (any edition is fine), used and new from $1.

Evaluation Success in the course rests more than anything on keeping up with readings and contributing to class discussion, which means that evaluation is spread fairly evenly over the quarter.

Every student will help to lead one class discussion (see attached guidelines).There will be one in-class exam (Monday, March 3) that will encourage you to review and synthesize materials read and discussed in class.A project is due at the end of the quarter (proposal, worth 5%, is due Feb.The project requires conducting primary research; specific topics will depend on the level of the student and be developed in consultation with the instructor to clearly reflect course themes.

Students will present their projects in Week 10.Class attendance, participation, and written responses to readings account for 40% of the final grade.Class attendance, participation, and written contributions Map Quiz Class leadership (graded as a group) In-class exam (March 3) Project proposal Project report (max 10 pages) + presentation 40% 5% 10% 20% 5% 20% Policies All assigned work is due by 5 pm on the due date in the Geography Main Office.Late work will lose two (2) percentage points per day.In-class evaluation cannot be made up without special advance notice and at the discretion of the instructor.

Any academic misconduct, such as plagiarizing, will be reported to OSU’s Committee on Academic Misconduct.Accommodation will be made for any student with special needs based on the impact of a disability.Please contact the instructor and also the Office for Disability Services at 292-3307, 150 Pomerene Hall.GRADING options for course: A,A-,B+,B,B-,C+,C,C-,D+,D, OR E.Students will be evaluated based on their academic level.

231 Course Schedule (Subject to Change) EVALUATION Schedule W1 Jan.I Picturing the Latin American Tropics Looking at Latin American landscapes Picturing the tropics: Peoples The Columbian Exchange Picturing the Tropics I: “Nature” Conservation No class; MLK holiday Picturing the Tropics II: The Pristine Myth Native Peoples W5 W6 W7 W8 W9 W10 Jan.18 II Hunger & Plenty: Commodifying Latin America’s Tropics Oligarchs & Multinationals: Latin America’s Globalized Agriculture Tackling land inequality: Agrarian reforms Tackling land inequality: Revolution ‘Adapting’ to poverty Women, Non-traditional agricultural exports, and Maquiladoras Cocaine: another NTAE Is Fair Trade the answer? Feb.27 III On the Move: Latin American Migrations Rural-urban migration & Making a living in the city International migration I: Getting There International migration II: Being Here Mar.5 IV Exam, Presentations and Wrap-Up In-class exam Project presentations and class summary Mar.13 Project due for graduating seniors (Tuesday) Grades posted for graduating seniors Mar.17 Project due for all others (Friday) Grades posted for all others 232 Begin to meet for project Project proposal due Project updates in-class Exam Presentations 3/11: PROJECT DUE (Graduating Seniors) 3/14: PROJECT DUE (all others) SCHEDULE OF READINGS PLEASE READ IN THE ORDER LISTED Note: “Elvia” Denotes readings from story of Elvia Alvarado, “Don’t Be Afraid Gringo” “Enrique” Denotes readings from “Enrique’s Journey” These books are not in the course pack.

WEEK 1 FRIDAY Jan 4 Course Introduction In-class reference: • UN News Service.Latin America can feed three times its population, yet millions go hungry.Latin America Rising: Democracy rising/8 hotspots of progress.NACLA Report on the Americas 38(6):37-40.WEEK 2 I Jan 7 • • • • Looking at Latin American Landscapes Blaikie, Piers.Changing environments or changing views? A political ecology for developing countries.Learning to see the impacts of individuals.The Geographical Review 91(1-2):423-429.Jan 9 • PICTURING THE LATIN AMERICAN TROPICS Picturing the Tropics: Peoples Columbus, C.Camden, Maine: International Marine Publishing Company.Map: “Columbus’ voyages to the New World,” Clawson (2004):96.Table: “International tourism to Latin America and the Caribbean,” Clawson (2006):322.

127-134) in Middle America: a Culture History of Heartland and Frontiers.233 234 WEEK 3 Jan 14 The Columbian Exchange • Blaut, J.179-213), in The Colonizer’s Model of the World: Geographical Diffusionism and Eurocentric History.Seeds of Change: A Quincentennial Commemoration.Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press.

Maps and Tables: All from: Dunmire, William W.1492; Some Utilitarian plants cultivated in Spain, 1492” “World Centers for Plant and Animal domestication”; “Pathways to Spain”; “Plants previously absent in Spain introduced by Moors”; “Prehispanic diffusion of food plant cultivation in the Americas” Jan 16 • • • Picturing the Tropics I: “Nature” Conservation Vandermeer, John, and Ivette Perfecto.

“The rain forest is neither fragile nor stable” (pp.In Breakfast of Biodiversity: the Truth about Rainforest Destruction .In the Amazon: conservation or colonialism? New York Times On-line.WEEK 4 Jan 21 No class; MLK Holiday Jan 23 Picturing the Tropics II: The Pristine Myth Native Peoples • Mann, Charles.And read one of the following: • Sawyer, Suzana.Subterranean techniques: corporate environmentalism, oil operations, and social injustice in the Ecuadorian rain forest.133-164 in In Search of the Rain Forest.II HUNGER & PLENTY: COMMODIFYING LATIN AMERICA’S TROPICS WEEK 5 235 Jan 28 Oligarchs & Multinationals: Latin America’s Globalized Agriculture • Clawson, David L.10, “Agriculture and agrarian development.” In Latin America and the Caribbean: Lands and Peoples (4th ed.“America’s sweet tooth: the Sugar Trust and the Caribbean lowlands” (Ch.

15-62) in Insatiable Appetite: the United States and the Ecological Degradation of the Tropical World.Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.and Brazil seek to promote ethanol in West.

Jan 30 • • • Tackling Land Inequality: Agrarian Reforms Elvia: Chapters 3-8 Kay, C.In Latin America Transformed: Globalization and Modernity, 2nd ed.

Clash of hope and fear as Venezuela seizes land.The history of ecological marginalization in Chiapas., Tropical Rainforests: Latin American Nature and Society in Transition, 2nd ed.Time of the snails: autonomy and resistance in Chiapas.NACLA Report on the Americas 38(5):34-38.Feb 6 • • Tackling Land Inequality: Revolution “Adapting” to Poverty Pace, Richard.7 in The Struggle for Amazon Town: Gurup Revisited, pp.Elvia: Chapters 9-12 And read one of the following: • Rosset, P.

In Green Guerillas: Environmental Conflicts and Initiatives in Latin America and the Caribbean, ed.WEEK 7 Feb 11 Women, Non-traditional Agricultural Exports, and Maquiladoras 236 • • • Tiano, S.In Understanding Contemporary Latin America, ed.

237 Feb 13 • • Cocaine: another NTAE Gray, Mike.111-131) in Drug Crazy: How We Got into this Mess and We Can Get Out.AntiDrug Efforts in Peru’s Upper Huallaga Valley.Perversely harmful effects of counter narcotics policy in the Andes., The Political Economy of the Drug Industry: Latin America and the International System.Gainesville: University Press of Florida.WEEK 8 Feb 18 Is Fair Trade the Answer? • • • Waridel, Laure.“The conventional coffee route” and “A different path for coffee growers.

4-5) in Coffee with Pleasure: Just Java and World Trade.247-258) in Brewing Justice: Fair Trade Coffee, Sustainability, and Survival.

Berkeley: University of California Press.27 III ON THE MOVE: LATIN AMERICAN MIGRATIONS Feb 20 • • Rural-Urban Migration & Making a Living in the City Roberts, J.4) in Trouble in Paradise: Globalization and Environmental Crises in Latin America.

Incremental gains: Lima’s tenacious squatters’ movement.NACLA Report on the Americas 40(4):30-33.

And read one of the following: • De Soto, Hernando.Industrial tortillas and folkloric Pepsi: the nutritional consequences of hybrid cuisines in Mexico.

235-250) in The Cultural Politics of Food and Eating: A Reader.In-class reference: Table: Population Reference Bureau.Excerpt from World Population Data Sheet.

Available on-line at /pdf07 WEEK 9 Feb 25 • International Migration I: Getting There Enrique: Prologue - Chapter 5 (pp.239 Feb 27 International Migration II: Being Here: Remittances, Transnationalism, and the Immigration Debate • • • Enrique: Chapter 6-Epilogue (pp.Binational impact of Latino remittances.Sending Money Home: Hispanic Remittances and Community Development.Western Union empire moves migrant cash home.WEEK 10 IV EXAM, PRESENTATIONS, AND WRAP-UP March 3 In-class exam March 5 Presentations and course summary Geography 630 Mon & Wed 10:30-12:18 PM Spring 2008 Classroom: 1116 Derby Hall Conservation of Natural Resources Professor: Joel Wainwright Email: email protected Office: 1169 Derby Hall Phone: 247-8746 Office hours: Monday 2:30-3:30 and by appointment This course concerns the conservation of nature.

More narrowly, we will study nature-society theory, environmental degradation and capitalist development, and conflicts around environmental change and degradation.This means we will study different philosophical approaches to nature, biophysical questions surrounding conservation, and actual conservation programs.This is a broad and complex set of issues.To bring it into focus and organize our studies, we will consider conservation mainly by way of two approaches: postcolonialism and political economy.With each approach, our aim is to understand the implications of conservation approaches for different social groups and classes.

To this end we will draw from a series of diverse real-world case studies – from the USA, Belize, Mexico, Cuba, and elsewhere – to understand how conservation ideas translate into concrete practices.Because the debates around environmental change have come to focus on climate, our last five class periods will focus entirely on climate change – its political and economic dimensions, principally – to consider how climate change is in turn changing environmental politics generally.I hope to run the course as a lecture-led seminar.This means that I will combine lectures with discussions.For our class discussions to be effective, you must come to class prepared.

240 Course requirements Attendance and participation 15 % Exams (2), 22.5% each 45 % Research project—mid-term assignment 15 % Research project—final paper 25 % Attendance and participation are required and will be graded.Participation is principally measured by the quality of your contributions to classroom discussions.To participate effectively, and to do well on exams, you will need to carefully read all of the assigned readings and attend all classes.

(If you cannot attend class because of illness, you must bring a signed note from a doctor excusing you from class.

) You will take two in-class exams (April 23 and May 28) comprised mainly of short answers to essay questions.Finally, 40% of your grade results from your work on a research paper that is due on June 2 (details below).241 Accommodation will be made for any student with special needs based on the impact of a disability.Please contact the instructor and also the Office for Disability Services at 292-3307, or go to 150 Pomerene Hall.The Course Plan at a Glance 1: Our Thematic Calendar 630 WTR 2008 at a glance Monday 24-Mar START Topic Wednesday 26-Mar class 1 Monday 31-Mar class 2 Wednesday 2-Apr class 3 Monday 7-Apr class 4 Wednesday 9-Apr class 5 Monday Wednesday 14-Apr 16-Apr class 6 class 7 Monday Wednesday 21-Apr Monday 28-Apr class 1 Wednesday 30-Apr class 2 Monday 5-May class 3 Wednesday 7-May class 4 Monday 12-May class 5 Wednesday 14-May class 6 Monday 19-May class 7 Wednesday Monday Wednesday 21-May Course introduction Nature and society: what is nature? How do we save it? Conservation priorities & the concept of ‘wilderness’ Conservation of genetic resources—the case of maize in Mexico Colonial legacies in conservation Conservation and indigenous lands Two films concerning indigenous environmental struggles An inconvenient truth Population and resource conservation class 8 23-Apr exam 1 class 8 26-May 28-May exam 2 242 The value of nature: what is the environment worth? Trading resources—case study of WTO environmental policies Environmental transition —the case of Cuban agriculture Climate change (1): political economy of carbon emissions Climate change (2): political economy of climate disasters Climate change (3): political economy of energy conservation Climate change (4): political economy of China's emissions Climate change (5): what is to be done? No classes: Memorial day exam 2 Monday 2-Jun END Geography 635 Winter 2008 research papers due at 3PM M-W 10:30-12:18 1080 Derby Hall Geography 635 Globalization and Environment This course is about international dimensions of environmental issues, including the effect of economic globalization on the environment and the globalization of environmental conservation.

We will cover different aspects of globalization, including free trade and global production chains, and how these contribute to environmental transformations.We will use globalization of food as an example of globalization that affects the environment.Focus on globalization of food also provides information about how globalization developed.Following this, we will cover responses to environmental problems, with an emphasis on international conservation efforts.We will examine the development of global environmentalism through international environmental conferences and protocols.

Global environmentalism has culminated in the notion of “sustainable development,” which attempts to bring together economic globalization and global conservation.The final part of the course will examine this new era of “green neoliberalism.” Throughout the course we will examine ways that relationships between more and less developed regions of the world influence variation in environmental impacts and responses.Professor: Becky Mansfield Office: 1160 Derby Hall Phone: (24)7-7264 Email: email protected Office hours: Mondays 2:00-4:00 pm, or by appointment Teaching Assistant: Emily Rupp Office: 1131 Derby Hall Phone: (29)2-1357 Email: email protected 243 Office hours: Thursdays 1:00-3:00pm, or by appointment Course format: This course is organized primarily as a seminar, with small and large group discussions.There will be short lectures, but the emphasis is on student involvement in discussions and other activities.

Students should feel free to ask questions and offer comments at all times.244 Reading materials: There are two texts and a set of articles for this course.The texts are available at campus area bookstores; the articles are available on Carmen.Imperial Nature: The World Bank and Struggles for Social Justice in the Age of Globalization.ISBN: 1904456448 Course requirements: Participation Pop quizzes Midterm Final Research essay 15% 15% 20% 25% 25% Participation (15%): All students are expected to come to class daily having done the day’s readings, ready to participate in discussions and related activities.This portion of your grade will be based on your daily presence in class and the quantity and quality of your contributions to the class.

Quality contributions are comments or questions which clearly reflect that you have read the material and have given careful thought to the topic being discussed.Meeting with me to discuss class material also counts toward participation.Regular attendance is the minimum required to receive a passing grade for participation.Pop quizzes (15%): There will be an unspecified number of pop quizzes.The first kind is a closed-book quiz exclusively on the readings for that day.These will be designed to be fairly easy for anyone having completed the readings.The second kind is an in-class, open-book, group activity using course materials to answer specified questions.Midterm and Final (Midterm 20%, Final 25%): The exams will be in-class, closed book.

They will consist of definitions, short answers, and essay questions.The final will focus on material covered after the midterm, but will be require you to address and integrate themes from the entire course.Research Essay (25%): This assignment asks you to apply course concepts, vocabulary, and readings to analyze your role in globalization and environment by researching a food item (of your choice) that you have recently eaten.The assignment requires that you do outside research and write an essay.You will be graded on the quality of the research 245 and analysis, the extent to which you use course concepts and how well you use them, and your writing.

An assignment with detailed instructions will be distributed in class.246 Course policies: Grading policies: • • • • • • Attendance: participation is based on attendance.If you are regularly absent, your participation grade will reflect your absences, even if you participate well on the days you do attend.Quizzes: missed quizzes cannot be made up.

If you show up late for class on a quiz day, you will not be given extra time to take the quiz.

(Remember, your lowest grade will be dropped.) Exams: exams can only be made up if you have an emergency such as a medical problem or death in the family.You will need to document the emergency.Research Essay: late essays will lose one point (out of 25) for every day they are late.

To avoid losing points, you must make arrangements AHEAD OF TIME.To pass the course: o You must receive a total grade of at least 55%.o You must complete all major assignments.

Who can do a coursework ecology plagiarism free business single spaced us letter size one day

Regardless of how well you do on other parts of the course, you will not pass the course if you miss an exam, fail to turn in a project, or miss more than six (1/3) of the class sessions.PLEASE SEE ME if you are having problems that prevent you from meeting this requirement; we may be able to make alternative arrangements.

Grading scale: 93-100 A; 90-92 A-; 87-89 B+; 83-86 B; 80-82 B-; 77-79 C+; 73-76 C; 70-72 C-; 67-69 D+; 55-66 D (I will use the rules of rounding: <100 Item - University documentation should be provided to me no later than 5 days before the first examination so that proper accommodations can be arranged. Academic Misconduct (and   Ask questions in class before you fall behind and come to my or the TA's office hours if you need further help. • It is difficult to learn  .Grading scale: 93-100 A; 90-92 A-; 87-89 B+; 83-86 B; 80-82 B-; 77-79 C+; 73-76 C; 70-72 C-; 67-69 D+; 55-66 D (I will use the rules of rounding: < .

) Misconduct: Cheating and plagiarism will not be tolerated.Plagiarism is defined as using another person's ideas without acknowledging from where the idea came.

Plagiarism ranges from direct copying of someone else's work to presenting someone else's ideas as though they are yours If you need custom essays in the UK, take advantage of our custom essay writing services. Trusted essay help is here! Get custom essays written by essay writers today..Plagiarism ranges from direct copying of someone else's work to presenting someone else's ideas as though they are yours.Please use citations to differentiate between your ideas and those you got from other sources (such as books and articles).Students agree that by taking this course all required papers may be subject to submission for textual similarity review to for the detection of plagiarism intellectual property.Students agree that by taking this course all required papers may be subject to submission for textual similarity review to for the detection of plagiarism.All submitted papers will be included as source documents in the reference database solely for the purpose of detecting plagiarism of such papers.Use of the service is subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use posted on the site.

Any student suspected of cheating or plagiarism will be reported to the Committee on Academic Misconduct.247 Disability: Accommodation will be made for any student with special needs based on the impact of a disability.Please contact the instructor and also the Office for Disability Services at 292-3307, 150 Pomerene Hall.248 Schedule, with topic, readings, and assignments (a list of readings with full references is at the end) Jan 4 Introduction: globalization and the global environment For reference, see: Adger et al.– Selections from Advancing a political ecology of global environmental discourses Jan 7 The “global environment” Read: Speth – Two perspectives on globalization and environment Mitchell – Selections from Rule of Experts: pp.

209-221 Jan 9 Defining globalization; geographical patterns of economic globalization Read: Ellwood – Ch 1, Ch 6 Jan 14 Implementing globalization: The Bretton Woods Organizations Read: Ellwood – Ch 2 Goldman – Preface, pp.46-78 for large themes, not details) Jan 16 Implementing globalization: Structural adjustment Read: Ellwood – Ch 3 Goldman – pp.78-99 Jan 21 NO CLASS: Martin Luther King Jr.

Day Jan 23 Globalization of food Read: Atkins and Bowler – Chapters 4 and 13 of Food in Society Jan 28 Colonialism and globalization of food Read: Juma – Selections from The Gene Hunters: pp.12-25 and 37-51 Colchester – Selections from Guatemala: pp.99-115 and 127-131 Jan 30 From the Green Revolution to Biotechnology Read: Atkins and Bowler – Chapter 17 of Food in Society The Ecologist – CGIAR: agricultural research for whom? The Ecologist – Letter Forum, between Norman Borlaug and Vandana Shiva 249 Feb 4 Issues in biotechnology Read: Schapiro – Sowing disaster? Avery – Genetically modified organisms can help save the planet Caplan – GMOs in agriculture: an environmentalist perspective Feb 6 MIDTERM EXAM Feb 11 Global environmental politics 1970s-80s: Stockholm to the Brundtland Report Read: Re-read pp.2-10 of Speth, Two perspectives on globalization and environment (from Jan 8) Adams – Chapter 3 of Green Development Feb 13 Sustainable development 1980s-90s: the Brundtland Report to the Earth Summit Read: Adams – Chapter 4 of Green Development Feb 18 Sustainable development and globalization early 2000s: the Johannesburg Summit Read: Wapner – World Summit on Sustainable Development La Vi a, Hoff and DeRose – The outcomes of Johannesburg Feb 20 Corporations in global environmental politics Read: World Business Council on Sustainable Development – Business Card World Business Council on Sustainable Development – “About” and “Member companies” BE SURE TO CLICK ON THE MAP (EACH REGION) TO SEE THE MEMBER COMPANIES Bruno and Karliner – Excerpts from : pp.10-21 and 80-109 Ellwood – Ch 4 Research Essay due, in class Feb 25 Green neoliberalism: the World Bank and large dams Read: Goldman – Ch 4 and 5 (through p.

200) Feb 27 Green neoliberalism: the World Bank and water privatization Read: Goldman – Ch 6 except pp.225-232 250 Mar 3 Green neoliberalism: resource management Read: Prudham – Poisoning the well: neoliberalism and the contamination… Robertson – The neoliberalization of ecosystem services: Wetland mitigation banking… Mar 5 Conclusion: contradictions and alternative futures Read: Goldman – Ch 7 Ellwood – Ch 7 Mar 13 (Thursday) FINAL EXAM 9:30-11:18 251 References for articles on Carmen Adams, W.Green Development: Environment and Sustainability in the Third World.

Adger, W Neil, Tor A Benjaminsen, Katrina Brown, and Hanne Svarstan.Advancing a political ecology of global environmental discourses.

Food in Society: Economy, Culture, Geography.

Genetically modified organisms can help save the planet.In Genetically Modified Organisms in Agriculture: Economics and Politics, edited by G.: The Corporate Takeover of Sustainable Development.

GMOs in agriculture: an environmentalist perspective.In Genetically Modified Organisms in Agriculture: Economics and Politics, edited by G.

Guatemala: the clamour for land and the fate of the forests.

In Struggle for Land and the Fate of the Forests, edited by M.CGIAR: Agricultural research for whom? The Ecologist 26 (6):259-270.The Gene Hunters: Biotechnology and the Scramble for Seeds .La Vi a, Antonio GM, Gretchen Hoff, and Anne Marie DeRose.The outcomes of Johannesburg: assessing the World Summit on Sustainable Development.Rule of Experts: Egypt, Techno-Politics, Modernity.Berkeley: University of California Press.Poisoning the well: neoliberalization and the contamination of municipal water in Walkerton, Ontario.In Neoliberal Environments: False Promises and Unnatural Consequences, edited by N.The neoliberalization of ecosystem services: wetland mitigation banking and the problem of measurment.

In Neoliberal Environments: False Promises and Unnatural Consequences edited by N.Sowing disaster? How genetically engineered American corn has altered the global landscape.Two perspectives on globalization and the environment.In Worlds Apart: Globalization and the Environment, edited by J.World Summit on Sustainable Development: toward a post-Jo'burg environmentalism.

Global Environmental Politics 3 (1):1-10.Business Card and List of Member companies and Council Members.ConchesGeneva: World Business Council on Sustainable Development.

Prerequisites Geog 240 or permission of instructor.Credit Hours This class is for 5 credits.Course Description What are the causes and consequences of recent land-use changes? Within North America, phenomena like urban decentralization, forest regeneration, agricultural intensification and movement from Ohio to the Sunbelt all have implications for the physical layout of the land, which in turn has both environmental and social implications.Land use, or the human modification of the physical environment, is a primary topic of interest to geographers.

In this course, we will review recent major land- 253 use changes in North America and connect these changes to recent trends in the economy.Thus, we will analyze how larger-scale processes lead to local landuse changes.Finally, we will examine two instances of shifting relationships between natural areas (i., the Great Lakes and forests) and land use.

Required Readings • A coursepack of recent articles from the geography literature concerning land use will be the primary readings for this course.Grading Policy Final course grades will be based on the following weighting of assessment components: Class participation and comments on weekly readings 30% 4 Homework assignments 20% Final project 50% Final course grades will be assigned based on the following grading scale: Grading Scale Percenta Letter Qualitative Description ge Grade 93-100 A Achievement that is outstanding relative to the level necessary to meet course requirements.9 B+ Achievement that is significantly above the level necessary to meet course requirements.

9 C+ Achievement that is in keeping with the course requirements in every respect.

9 D+ Achievement that is worthy of credit even though it fails to meet fully the course requirements.9 E Work that was either completed but not worthy of credit, or incomplete.Academic Misconduct It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the 254 Committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-847).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( /info for students/ ).

Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD292-0901; /.255 Course Schedule Week 1 Topic Lab Introduction to the course Changing urban regions 2 Trends in metropolitan population 3 Transportation 4 Micropolitan areas and exurbanization Economic shifts 5 The information economy 6 Deindustrialization 7 Extractive industries From resource regions to amenity-led growth 8 Case study: land-use change along Lake Erie 9 Case study: forest regeneration in Southeast Ohio 10 Project presentation Project Note: this schedule is subject to change.Please check the class website on Carmen frequently for updates.Prerequisites Geog 240 or permission of instructor.Credit Hours This class is for 5 credits.Course Description What are the causes and consequences of recent land-use changes? Within North America, phenomena like urban decentralization, forest regeneration, agricultural intensification and movement from Ohio to the Sunbelt all have implications for the physical layout of the land, which in turn has both environmental and social implications.Land use, or the human modification of the physical environment, is a primary topic of interest to geographers.In this course, we will review recent major landuse changes in North America and connect these changes to recent trends in the economy.

Thus, we will analyze how larger-scale processes lead to local landuse changes.Finally, we will examine two instances of shifting relationships between natural areas (i., the Great Lakes and forests) and land use.Required Readings • A coursepack of recent articles from the geography literature concerning land use will be the primary readings for this course.

Grading Policy Final course grades will be based on the following weighting of assessment components: Class participation and comments on weekly readings 30% 4 Homework assignments 20% Final project 50% Final course grades will be assigned based on the following grading scale: Grading Scale Percenta Letter Qualitative Description ge Grade 93-100 A Achievement that is outstanding relative to the level 257 90-92.9 AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D E necessary to meet course requirements.Achievement that is significantly above the level necessary to meet course requirements.Achievement that is in keeping with the course requirements in every respect.Achievement that is worthy of credit even though it fails to meet fully the course requirements.Work that was either completed but not worthy of credit, or incomplete.

Academic Misconduct It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the Committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-847).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( /info for students/ ).Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.

The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD292-0901; /.258 Course Schedule Week 1 Topic Lab Introduction to the course Changing urban regions 2 Trends in metropolitan population 3 Transportation 4 Micropolitan areas and exurbanization Economic shifts 5 The information economy 6 Deindustrialization 7 Extractive industries From resource regions to amenity-led growth 8 Case study: land-use change along Lake Erie 9 Case study: forest regeneration in Southeast Ohio 10 Project presentation Project Note: this schedule is subject to change.Please check the class website on Carmen frequently for updates.Disabilities: The Office for Disability Services, located in 150 Pomerene Hall offers services for students with documented disabilities.

Population Geography Population Geography 670 Derby Hall 1080 Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:30-7:18pm 259 Professor Thomas 1124 Derby Hall 614-247-8222 email protected Winter office hours: Tuesdays 2pm-3:30pm and by appointment Objectives 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) To learn and be able to utilize the basic tools used by population geographers; To gain an understanding of some of the major factors affecting population trends globally and in select locations; To complicate assumptions about population explosion, fertility rates, and reproduction; To gain a greater sensitivity to the various influences impacting fertility and women’s reproduction and health in the US and globally; To analyze mortality and morbidity, particularly AIDS, in different political, geographical, and economic contexts; To appreciate and comprehend the political, economic, and social systems and interconnections affecting migration trends and the lives of migrants and refugees; To address the issues affecting environmental degradation, food shortages, and poverty relating to population growth across scale and in third world mega-cities.Plagiarism is the representation of another’s works or ideas as one’s own.You must acknowledge others’ work when you quote them or paraphrase their ideas and words.All cases of suspected plagiarism, in accordance with university rules, will be reported to the Committee on Academic Misconduct.

If you have questions about this or other rules of conduct for students, see the student affairs webpage concerning code of conduct at /resource .260 Readings: The readings listed on the syllabus are available as PDFs or as web files on our course web site via Carmen ( /carmen/).You should also download the 2007 World Population Data Sheet (also on Carmen) and print it – please bring it to every class.Course requirements and Grades Requirement % of final grade 1.I will assign 10-15 minute writing exercises frequently in class (there will be between 4-6 exercises total).

The purpose is to give you a chance to develop your ability to write a short essay effectively.The grade for the exercises will be based on the quality of your writing and arguments and your improvement over time.An average of all exercises will constitute 15% of your final grade, so try not to miss any classes or fall behind on your reading, or your average will fall.You may not make-up in class writing exercises if you are absent from class.(Your lowest score will be dropped before averaging.

This exam will consist of 2-3 essay questions based on course materials and readings, discussions, and lectures; it will constitute 25% of your final grade for the course.In addition to being tested on the context of these materials, you should be ready to reflect on how they have informed, challenged, transformed, or enhanced your awareness about themes covered in class.You are free to choose a topic for the research paper from the following: fertility, family planning, reproductive politics, HIV/AIDS, mortality, internal or international migration, or refugees.Your research topic must be applied to a country of your choosing, but not the United States.You must submit a research proposal and have your paper idea approved by the beginning of week six (February 5, 200 words, worth 5% of your paper’s grade).

The paper is due March 6, the last day of class.Undergraduates must write 8-10 pages and Masters students should write 15 pages.All papers should have 12 point font, 1 inch margins, double spacing, and be adequately cited.You are encouraged to supplement your text with tables, charts, or graphs.(I will discuss the papers in class in more detail.

The second exam will be take home, and it is worth 30% of your grade.It must be uploaded to Carmen or emailed to me as an 261 attachment by Tuesday, March 11, 5:30pm.No late exams will be accepted, no exceptions.

You are welcome to send me your exam early.Please arrive promptly, complete readings before class meetings, and participate actively in class discussions and provide thoughtful engagement with lectures, readings, and other class materials.262 Disabilities and accommodations Every student on campus has a right to a classroom learning environment that is accessible to them.If you have a learning, visual, hearing, mobility, or other disability, please contact me immediately to arrange reasonable accommodations.

The Office for Students with Disabilities is located at Murphy Hall A255, and their telephone is (310) 825-1501.Class schedule and readings Please note: • • Readings are to be completed before the class period for which they are assigned.You are expected to read and to be ready to discuss all readings, so plan wisely so that you may stay on schedule.

If you fall behind, please see me immediately.

Introduction to the course, world population change.Print 2007 World Population Data Sheet and bring to every class.New population policies: advancing women's health and rights.Population policies and reproductive choice.

Finish Ashford and start on China readings.Malthusian models and Chinese realities: the Chinese demographic system 1700-2000.Population and Development Review 25(1): 33-65.263 Hesketh, Therese, Li Lu, and Zhu Wei Xing (2005).The effect of China’s one-child family policy after 25 years.New England Journal of Medicine 353 (11): 1171-1176.

“Controlling births and bodies in village China.The elimination of contraceptive acceptor targets and the evolution of population policy in India.Journal of Public Health Policy 22(2): 169-174 reprinted from The Nation, 2000 DeParle, Jason (2007).Jobs abroad support ‘model’ state in India.In class videos: The legacy of Malthus, and Something like a war Thursday, January 24.The legacy of eugenics in the United States.“From Norplant to the contraceptive vaccine: the new frontier of population control” in Killing the black body: race, reproduction and the meaning of liberty.

United States Census: changing American fertility.Improving the health of the world’s poorest people.Paper proposals due today Thursday, February 7.In class video: Pandemic: Facing AIDS Week 7.(2000) “Rethinking the African AIDS Epidemic.” Population and development review 26(1): 117.World Health Organization HIV/AIDS country information: choose one country and read its “profile” (also print it and bring to class for discussion).

You might also want to look at the epidemiological fact sheet and health indicators for your chosen country./hiv/countries/en/ Thursday, February 14.Martin, Philip and Jonas Widgren (2002).International migration: a global challenge.

UNFPA State of World Population 2007: Unleashing the potential of urban growth.(For a better view of the graphics, go to website listed on publication) Satterthwaite, David (2003).The links between poverty and environment in urban areas of Africa, Asia, and Latin America.Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 590: 73-92.

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) (2006).Chapter 2: Safeguarding asylum, in The state of the world’s refugees 2006.

(No office hours this week!) Tuesday, February 26.United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) (2006).Chapter 6: Rethinking durable solutions, in The state of the world’s refugees 2006.In class video: TBD Thursday, February 28.

Global food security: challenges and policies.

Malnutrition is still major contributor to child deaths.Food and Agricultural Organization of the UN (2006).The state of food insecurity in the world 2006.

Environmental degradation and human population.Chapter 5: Urbanization and sustainability in the 21st century.UNFPA State of World Population 2007: Unleashing the potential of urban growth .

Trying to connect the dinner plate to climate change.Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (2006).266 Winter 2008: Geography H410: Global Climate & Environmental Change (call #21765-3) When and Where: Monday and Wednesday: Derby Hall Room 140 (11:00 a.) Tuesday: in Derby Hall Room 140 (12:30 to 2:18 p.Ellen Mosley-Thompson ( email protected ) Office: Derby Hall 1140; Telephone: 292-2580 or -6662) Office Hours: Monday and Wednesday 1:30 to 3:00 pm (or by appointment) Teaching Assistant: Ms.Karin Bumbaco ( email protected ) Office: 1145 Derby Hall; Telephone 292-6127 Office hours: Wednesday 9:15 to 10:45 am; Friday 10:00 to 11:30 am and by appointment Course Objectives: This course is taught in a lecture / seminar format and is designed to provide a more thorough understanding of the scientific basis of both natural and anthropogenic (human produced) climate and environmental changes.You will explore the key issues surrounding 20th century climate change (popularly called global warming) and the role of human activities in shaping the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the environment that sustains life on Earth.Through readings, lectures, discussions, student presentations, class debates and films you will gain insight to how these anticipated changes are likely to affect your future and explore actions by which you may contribute to solutions.You will gain experience using peerreviewed literature to research a topic and then summarize your findings both orally and in writing.

A key objective is to provide you with the knowledge base and skills to critically evaluate information you read or hear concerning climate change and related environmental issues.Prerequisites: This course has no prerequisites except that you must be officially admitted to the University Honors Program.Degree GEC requirements for Natural Science (Physical Science) and Social Sciences (Human, Natural, and Economic Resources) Textbooks (required - will be provided compliments of the Geography Department): 1) Brown, Lester R.Parson, The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change: A Guide 267 to the Debate.Selected journal articles and book chapters will be placed on electronic reserve for the class.Additional books will be placed on reserve in the Geology Library in Orton Hall unless specified otherwise.Additional materials and exercises will be accessible for copying to your memory stick or CD.Please bookmark the class web page in your internet browser.

If you have trouble getting to the web page, you can log into the Geography Dept.web page and from here click on Winter quarter classes and then on H410.Throughout the quarter additional reading and reference materials may be required.

You will be alerted in class about updates to either Carmen or the class web page.At the beginning of the quarter the schedule of activities (lectures, guest speakers, group discussions, field trips, debates, presentations, papers, and films) will be posted on the class web page and will be updated as the class progresses.All copies of my lectures will be posted on Carmen.Lectures with many color photos tend to be very large.

In this case a “print” version in black and white will be available.Except for the first week of the class, readings are assigned in the week prior to the presentation of the material.Note that the class schedule may change slightly as the quarter progresses and you will be alerted to these changes.Remember that this is a lecture/ seminar style course and thus you need to remain flexible so that we may capitalize on climate- and/or environment-related events and special speakers on campus.Grading: Group presentations: 20% (two presentations – 10% each) Individual research paper: 15% Exercises: 20% (Exercise 1 – 5%; Exercise 2 – 10%; Exercise 3 – 5%); Exercise 4 is provides up to 10 extra points applied to your total for Exercises 1, 2, and 3.

Debates: 20% (two debates – 10% each) Final examination: 15% (an essay) Quizzes (3%), Participation (4%) and Attendance (3%): 10% This means attending each class and field trips (if any), turning in all work on time, participating in the discussions, asking questions, being attentive and engaged in the class.268 An excused absence requires written documentation (doctor’s excuse) or prior permission from Dr.I consider your requests on a case by case basis.

There will be a few quick quizzes and they will be announced in advance.Additional Class Materials: Additional materials will be placed on reserve throughout the quarter.The list of these will be maintained on the class web page under Reserve Materials.All materials (unless otherwise indicated) are on closed reserve in the Geology Library in Orton Hall the building with the bell tower on the south side the Oval .All materials will be filed under Geography H410 unless otherwise indicated.

Additional class materials may be made available throughout the quarter.An Important Note about Plagiarism and Academic Misconduct: Plagiarism and other forms of cheating will not be tolerated.Please see the Code of Student Conduct ( /resource ).University rules provide severe penalties for academic misconduct, ranging from course failure to dismissal from the university.University rules are found in the handbook used in all survey courses: “University Survey - A Guidebook and Readings for New Students.

” Any questions about this policy, or your grade, should be brought directly to the attention of Dr.Students with Disabilities and Special Needs: Any student needing special accommodation on the basis of any disability must advise the instructor at the beginning of class.All necessary accommodations will be made upon presentation of relevant certification, presented in a timely manner.

Students are also responsible for making contact with the Office for Disability Services at 292-3307, 150 Pomerene Hall, prior to or at the beginning of the quarter.

Welcome to this Honors Seminar: I look forward to working with you as a group and individually as you learn more about your environment and the Earth’s climate system - past, present and future.01 2008 Global Environmental History Tuesday, Thursday 10:30-12:18 40 11187-2 Prof.John Brooke History Dulles Hall 257 (292-8757) Office Hours: Monday, 9:30-11:00, Tuesday, 1:30-3:15 Graduate Assistant: Rob Denning Spring SO Dept.of E-Mail: email protected This course explores the long history of the earth and humanity from an environmental/earth systems perspective, focusing on the changing relationship of human societies and global ecologies and the problem of the sustainability of the human condition.

A brief introduction to climate and the biosphere in geological time establishes the background for a comparative overview of three broad "human revolutions": the origin of the human species, the agricultural revolution, and the industrial revolution.Themes of particular importance include issues in human evolution, demography, subsistence, and technology, debates over gradual and catastrophic change in climate and the biosphere, and the prospects for a sustainable future.Term projects allow students to explore problems of individual interest.Required Readings for Spring 2008 include: Alfred Crosby, The Children of the Sun may not be available until March 22 at the bookstores Brian Fagan, The Long Summer Arno Karlen, Man and Microbes William Ruddiman, Plows, Plagues, and Petroleum These four books are available at the bookstores.John Brooke, “A Rough World”, Chapter 1-8.

This is a typescript of a book in development that will be available on line and at cost of reproduction.There will also be readings posted on Carmen.Requirements: Class attendance and participation in discussions (15%), quizes IDs and short essays on Parts I, II, and III (65%), term project (20%).Recommendation: High school-level science background is assumed; university courses in history, archaeology, anthropology, biology, geology, or technology will all be useful background.Undergraduate Program Credit: History: This course may be counted as Group A or Group B, and either “pre-1750” or “post- 270 1750.

” International Studies: This course may be taken as a part of the Minor in Globalization Studies offered by the Program in International Studies, to fulfill part of the requirement in “Economic, Environmental, and Political Dimensions.” Public Health: This course may be taken as an elective in the Minor in Public Health.GEC: This course may be taken to fulfill either (but not both) of two GEC Requirements: 4C: Social Science: Human, Natural, and Economic Resources, and 6B: Diversity Experiences: International Issues (Global or Non-Western).Students taking the course for either of these categories need to plan their projects in consultation with the instructor so as to meet the requirement guidelines.Quizes: All three quizes are based on ID lists developed by the class and the instructor.

Shorter and longer essays will allow you to demonstrate your understanding of the significance and interconnection of various topics and themes developed in the readings, lectures, and discussions.Note: Occasionally students use books and articles not assigned for this course.This is acceptable only after you have demonstrated a specific and footnoted command of the assigned readings.Other readings and Website: Wherever possible, all other course readings, both required and recommended, and all visual materials used in class, will be posted on Carmen.When you have accessed the syllabus via the History 366 page, click on the highlighted code following the article or chapter name: Materials that are available in hard copy at the Reserve desk, Sullivant Library, are marked RESERVE.

Term projects: Everyone will do a short term project that will reflect both a special interest and your understanding of the course readings.These are intended to be preliminary investigation of a problem, not full-scale solutions based on primary research.You might visualize your paper for this class as an exploration of a topic in preparation for a longer research project like an honors thesis.Topics can be thematic, or may look at a specific country or region in historical time.Typically these projects are international in their focus.

Typically these projects are international in their focus.However, if you choose to do a topic involving the United States, you may not count this course toward the fulfillment of GEC 6 B: Diversity Experiences: International Issues.You have two choices in your research scope: Option 1.Read several (4-8) articles and sections of books that pertain to your topic; 271 Option 2: Select two books on a theme and compare their approaches and conclusions.Note: you may use public open-source websites, but these may not be the only sources for your paper.

A number of books are on reserve for the course that may be helpful in thinking about your topic.Project Deadlines: Project consultation by April 17: Please come to see me during my office hours, or make an appointment, to talk about a project plan -- I can provide you with start-up bibliography; Project status report and bibliography by May 15; Internet citations must be approved by the instructor.Project report due Friday, May 30, 12:00 noon, Dulles 257.Length: 5-6 pages, plus maps, charts, diagrams, and other visual aids.Please see the History 366 Carmen website for a fuller description of the projects, list of projects done in previous years, and recommended readings.

CLASSES AND READINGS Note: My chapters online each has an associated file of figures.Some of these are a bit complicated, and I will try to post simpler versions.INTRODUCTION: DEFINITIONS AND ORIGINS Mar.25: Prologue: Time, nature, humanity, history, ecology -- some concepts and definitions Mar.25, 27: Four billion years of evolution and catastrophe on the ancient earth: biosphere, atmosphere, geosphere Brooke, A Rough World, Chapter 1.

Carmen Text without notes = 1-16 Loper, David.“Scorched Earth…” The Sciences 30 (Sept.1990), 22-28 Carmen Ruddiman, Plows, Plagues and Petroleum, 3-16 Crosby, Children of the Sun, 1-6 Optional: Muller, “Avalanches at the core-mantle boundary,” Geophysical Research Letters 29 (2002) 41-1-4 Carmen PART 1: THE EMERGENCE OF HUMANITY ON AN INCREASING COLD PLANET Apr.

1: Global climate change and the origins of the Genus Homo, 55 million to one 272 million years BP Brooke, A Rough World, Chapter 2, 1-12 Carmen Text w/o notes = 1-26 Gore, “The Dawn of Humans: The First Steps,” National Geographic Feb.

1997, 72-100 (lots of pictures!!) Reserve Crosby, Children of the Sun, 7-24 Ruddiman, Plows, Plagues and Petroleum, 17-34 Optional: deMenocal, Peter B.“African climate change and faunal evolution during the Pliocene-Pleistocene,” Earth and Planetary Science Letters 220 (March 2004), 3-24.3, 8: Ice age environments and Homo sapiens: one million to twelve thousand years BP Brooke, A Rough World, Chapter 2, pp.“Biogeography and evolution of the genus Homo,” Trends in Ecology and Evolution 20 (August 2005), 457-63.Carmen Ruddiman, Plows, Plagues and Petroleum, 35-60 Stringer, Chris.“Out of Ethiopia,” Nature, June 12, 2003, Vol.Carmen Crosby, Children of the Sun, 7-24 Karlen, Man and Microbes, 13-28 Apr.

10: First in-class quiz PART 2: AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES AND GLOBAL ECOLOGIES ON A WARM PLANET: 12,000 BP TO AD 1700 Apr.15, 17: Agricultural Revolutions: 10,000 to 4,000 BC Fagan, The Long Summer, 1-127 or Brooke, A Rough World, Chapter 3, 4, 5 Carmen Text w/o notes = 1-24, 1-23, 1-14 Ruddiman, Plows, Plagues and Petroleum, 63-114 Crosby, Children of the Sun, 25-44 Karlen, Man and Microbes, 27-46 Diamond, Jared, and Peter Bellwood, “Farmers and Their Languages: The First Expansions,” Science 300 (2003), 597-603.Carmen Ancient and Medieval societies: 4000BC-1400AD Apr.22: Population and resources old: Intensification: Soils, States and Cities Brooke, A Rough World, Chapter 6 Text w/o notes = 1-15 Carmen Diamond, Collapse, 79-119 Reserve and Carmen 273 Apr.24: Climate old: Challenges: Climate, Disease, and culture Fagan, The Long Summer, 127-188 or Brooke, A Rough World, Chapter 7 (Bronze and Iron Ages) Text w/o notes = 1-13 Carmen Ruddiman, Plows, Plagues and Petroleum, 63-146 Optional: deMenocal, Peter B.

“Cultural Responses to Climate Change During the Late Holocene,” Science 292 (2001), 667-73.29: Disease Fagan, The Long Summer, 189-246 read a chapter of your choice or Brooke, A Rough World, Chapter 8 (Ancient 1-14 and Medieval 14-29 Worlds) Carmen Karlen, Man and Microbes, 47-91 Stark, “Epidemics, Networks, and The Rise of Christianity, ” Semeia 56 (1992), 159-75 Carmen May 1: Reuniting Pangaea: Europe and the World, 1492-1700 Crosby, Children of the Sun, 45-58 Karlen, Man and Microbes, 93-128 Acuna-Soto, Rodolpho, et al., “Megadroughts and Megadeath in 16th Century Mexico,” Emerging Infectious Diseases 8 (2002), 360-62 Carmen May 6: Second in-class quiz PART 3: INDUSTRIAL SOCIETIES ON A FRAGILE PLANET: 1700 TO PRESENT May 8, 13: Energy Crosby, Children of the Sun, 59-116 Smil, Energy in World History, 206-222, 242-256 Reserve and Carmen Perez, Technological Revolutions and Financial Capital, 8-21 Reserve and Carmen May 15, 20: Population 274 Karlen, Man and Microbes, 129-213 Livi-Bacci, A Concise History of World Population 3d ed , 90-107, 128-34 Reserve and Carmen Singer, Max."The Population Surprise," Atlantic Monthly Aug.

“The World in Numbers: Population 2050,” Atlantic Monthly Oct.2002, 4041 Carmen May 22, 27: Impacts Ruddiman, Plows, Plagues and Petroleum, 149-194 Crosby, Children of the Sun, 117-66 Karlen, Man and Microbes, 1-11, 215-230 Hansen, “Defusing the Global Warming Time-Bomb,” Scientific-American Mar., 2004, 68-77 Carmen May 29: The Coming Challenge McKibben, A Special Moment in History,” Atlantic Monthly May 1998 55-78 Carmen Norgaard, “Optimism, Pessimism, and Science, BioScience 52 (2002) 287-92 Carmen Velders, “The Importance of the Montreal Protocol,” PNAS 104 (2007), 4814-19 Carmen May 30: Project essay due Final quiz: Monday, June 2: 9:30-11:18 SO 40 American Environmental History Office hours: MW 11:30am-1pm 165 Dulles Hall (292-6843) E-mail: email protected Course website: Carmen For History majors: the course is Group B (North America), post-1750 American Environmental History will focus on the history of American ecosystems from last Ice Age to the present.We will study scientific and historical debates over the 275 causes of environmental change.

We will spend some time on the history of the environmental movement and environmental philosophy, but our main purpose is to consider the historic impacts of humans and nonhumans on each other.Required Readings William Cronon, Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West Alfred Crosby, Ecological Imperialism: The Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900 Hal Rothman, The Greening of a Nation? Environmentalism in the United States since 1945 Donald Worster, The Dust Bowl: The Southern Plains in the 1930s J.McNeill, Something New Under the Sun All the other readings are available electronically on Carmen.The syllabus provides a detailed outline of what we'll cover in the course.

Please refer to it often as you plan your studying.We will not read all these books in their entirety and most are available through the University library system.You needn't purchase all of them, if you can't afford them.Please feel free to share books with classmates or borrow them from the State Library or the Columbus Metropolitan Library System.Examinations Discussion and Attendance (10% of grade): Attendance and participation in class discussions is mandatory.

If your attendance is perfect and you do not participate in class discussions, you will receive a B- (82) for discussion and participation.If your attendance is poor, your grade will fall below 82; if your participation in discussions is good, your grade will rise above 82.Quizzes (15% of grade): There will be quizzes on the readings in the course nearly every week.The quizzes will ask you to report fully and accurately on the content of readings in the course.Midterm and Final Examinations (20% and 30% of grade): There will be a midterm examination and a final examination.

The midterm will ask you to write one comprehensive one-hour essay, the final two.The exam schedule is: Midterm: Final: Paper: Monday, April 28 Tuesday, June 3, 1:30pm – 3:18pm Wednesday, May 14 Essay (25% of grade): You will be asked to turn in an interpretive essay (no more than 5-6 pages in length), in which you reflect on a major problem in environmental history.You should devote these essays to an analysis of a particular historical and/or scientific debate.The essays should not be mere book reports, but should reflect your effort to engage, critique, and move beyond the ideas of particular authors as you strive to integrate their work into the larger framework of the course.276 Please think seriously and creatively about the content of these essays, and write them as well as you know how.

They will be evaluated for the quality and concision of their prose as well as for the breadth and depth of their thought.That said, try to have fun with the essays: they're your chance to play with the ideas in the course and to test out different ways of looking at this complicated material.(If you would like to replace the essay with a short research paper, you are welcome to do so provided you make prior arrangements with me by no later than the fifth week of the quarter.) Be forewarned that late essays will be marked down by at least one-third of a grade unless other arrangements are made well prior to the due date.

No essay will be accepted after the final exam.

Your grade will be determined as follows: Discussion and attendance Quizzes Midterm Final Essay 10% 15% 20% 30% 25% Schedule of Readings and Discussions Week 1.Introduction; Native American Ecology (3/24 & 26) What is environmental history? What were the relationships between various Native American peoples and the environment? David Appell, “The New Uncertainty Principle,” Scientific American (January 2001) 18-19 W.Wayt Gibbs, “The Arctic Oil and Wildlife Refuge,” Scientific American (May 2001) 62-9 Sarah Simpson, “Debit or Credit? Whether CO2-consuming Trees Can Offset Global Warming Is Far from Certain,” Scientific American (February 2001) 25 Glen Martin, "Keepers of the Oaks," Discover (Aug.Asian and European Invasions (3/31 & 4/2) Migration, disease, death, and extinction in the early Holocene and the postColumbian period Co-invasion of plants and animals Selling plants and animals Crosby, Ecological Imperialism, 1-103, 132-216, 269-308 277 Jeffrey Sachs, et al.

“The Geography of Poverty and Wealth,” Scientific American (March 2001) 70-5 Recommended: Crosby, 104-131, 217-268.Jared Diamond, Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies.Jared Diamond, Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed.Asian and European Invasions; Native American Ecology (con't) (4/7 & 9) Resource exploitation, environmental equilibrium, and environmental damage “Mammoths of the Ice Age” (video in class) Richard Stone, “The Cold Zone,” Discover (Feb.

2000), 58-65 “Tusk Tales,” Discover (Jan.1997), 22 “Stranded on Santa Rosa,” Discover (Apr.1995), 20 Recommended: Thompson Webb III, “Is Vegetation in Equilibrium with Climate? How to Interpret Late-Quaternary Pollen Data,” Vegatatio 67 (1986), 75-91 Bj rb Kurt n and Elaine Anderson, Pleistocene Mammals of North America (New York: Columbia University Press, 1980, 235-8 Robert S., “Shasta Ground Sloth at Shelter Cave, New Mexico: Environment, Diet, and Extinction,” Quaternary Research 14 (1980), 360-76 Week 4.

Developing a New Nation in the Nineteenth Century (4/14 & 16) Nature and civilization Cultivation and exploitation Cronon, Nature's Metropolis, xiii-206 Recommended: Lisa J.Davis, “Holocene Variation in Spatial Scales of Vegetation Pattern in the Upper Great Lakes,” Ecology 74 (1993), 826-39 Week 5.An Urban, Industrial Destiny (4/21 & 23) Improving nature Developing the Midwest and the South The ecology of tallgrass prairies, white pine forests, and bison Cronon, Nature's Metropolis, 207-390 Dan Flores, "Bison Ecology and Bison Diplomacy: The Southern Plains from 1800 to 1850," Journal of American History 77 (1991), 465-85 278 Recommended: Steinburg, Ted (1991) Nature Incorporated: Industrialization and the Waters of New England.Environmental Disaster on the Great Plains (4/28 & 30) MIDTERM EXAMINATION The ecology of shortgrass prairies Settling the Great Plains The Dust Bowl Irrigation and the Ogallala aquifer Worster, Dust Bowl, 3-180 “The Once and Future Dust Bowl,” Discover (Apr.1997), 16 Carl Zimmer, “How to Make a Desert,” Discover (Feb.1995), 50-56 Recommended: Geoff Cunfer (2005) On the Great Plains: Agriculture and Environment V.Holliday, "Middle Holocene Drought on the Southern High Plains," Quaternary Research (1989), 74-82 J.Weaver, “Replacement of True Prairie by Mixed Prairie in Eastern Nebraska and Kansas,” Ecology 24 (1943), 421-34 Week 7.Ecology and Resource Management (5/5 & 7) Managing the environment Conserving resources: Water, Fish, Farmland Worster, Dust Bowl, 182-243 William Cronon, "A Place for Stories: Nature, History, and Narrative," Journal of American History, 78 (1992), 1347-76 Readings on Resource Conservation and Wilderness Preservation: John Wesley Powell, The Reclamation Act of 1902, and John Muir Daniel Pauly and Reg Watson, “Counting the Last Fish,” Scientific American (July 2003) 42-7 Recommended: Arthur F.McEvoy, The Fisherman's Problem: Ecology and Law in the California Fisheries Week 8.

The Contradictions of Progressive Conservation (5/12 & 14) PAPER DUE: Week 8 The Conservation Vision Planning Against Disaster Readings on the Emergence of Ecology: Ellen Swallow, Frederic Clements, Henry Gleason, and Aldo Leopold 279 “Rachel Carson and Silent Spring” (video in class) Rothman, The Greening of a Nation, 1-31 Week 9.Environmental Decades: The Perils of Success (5/19 & 21) Urban Pollution Redefining Risk: NEPA and the Rise of Environmental Law Energy Crisis Twentieth Century Environmental Problems Backlash: Environmental Politics in the 1980's Rothman, The Greening of a Nation, 33-210 Jocelyn Kaiser, “Sipping from a Poisoned Chalice,” Science (October 17 2003) 3769 Rebecca Renner, “Scotching Scotchguard,” Scientific American (March 2001) 18 Rebecca Renner, “An Environmental Solution: Ionic Liquids May Replace Hazardous Solvents,” Scientific American (August 2001) 19 Recommended: Andrew Hurley, Environmental Inequalities: Class, Race, and Industrial Pollution in Gary, Indiana, 1955-1980 Dunlap, Thomas (1981) Scientists, Citizens, and Public Policy.Russell, Edmund (2001) War and Nature: Fighting Humans and Insects with Chemicals from World War I to Silent Spring.(1997) Hazards of the Job: From Industrial Disease to Environmental Health Science.Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.Environmental Politics in the Reagan/Bush/Clinton/Bush Eras (5/26 & 28) Scale Shift: The Prospect of Global Change Our Common Environmental Future J.

McNeill, Something New Under the Sun Recommended: Terence Kehoe, "Merchants of Pollution? The Soap and Detergent Industry and the Fight to Restore Great Lakes Water Quality, 1965-1972," Environmental History Review (1992).FINAL EXAMINATION Additional Information 280 History Department Policy on Adding a Course to Your Schedule “All students must be officially enrolled in the course by the end of the second full week of the quarter.No requests to add the course will be approved by the Chair of the Department after that time.Enrolling officially and on time is solely the responsibility of the student.

” Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; /.Academic Misconduct It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term academic misconduct includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.

Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).

For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( /resource ).Here is a direct link for discussion of plagiarism: /writingCenter/handouts/research Here is the direct link to the OSU Writing Center: Grading Policy 1) The grade breakdowns are as follows: A: 92.4; E: below 62 2) Since the University does not record D- grades, a student earning a course average below 62 will receive an E in this course.

281 3) In order to pass the course, you must pass the Final Exam with at least a 62.4) The expectations for average, good, and excellent work will be spelled out for each particular assignment.Learning Objectives Students will evaluate histories, popular scientific articles, and original sources, including speeches, legislative acts, maps, historical photographs, and other evidence.The goal will be to develop students’ capacity for historical response and judgment; interpretation and evaluation; and critical reading, seeing, thinking, and writing.1/ IS 12189-0) Spring Quarter 2008 Tu, Th 9:30 - 11:18 a.1041 McPherson Chemical Lab (MP) Title: Problems and Policies in World Population, Food and Environment Instructor: Prof., Ph: 292-6244 e-mail: email protected , Dept.Before and after class office hours in MP and by appointment., Ph: 292-1253 e-mail: email protected /class/aede597.01H/Hitzhusen/ Goals/Rationale: This is a thematic upper division course drawing upon multiple disciplines to enrich student experiences of the contemporary world.Objectives: The course objectives are for honor students to: (1) become knowledgeable of population, food and environmental problems and policies in developing countries, (2) understand concepts from demography, ecology, economics and policy science necessary to address the interdependent population, food and environmental problems, and (3) learn and apply some basic research methods to 282 identify associated factors and develop policy options to address the foregoing problems.

Class attendance and participation are important.Grading: Grades are based on a two part policy research paper (45%), three problem sets (30%), student oral reports/defense of paper methods and findings (15%), and class attendance/participation (10%).The problem sets cover the key analytical concepts of the population, food and environmental sections of the course.Due Dates: References: Problem Sets (30%) 15 (Th) Paper Outline/Abstract (15%) Final Research Paper (30%) April 17 (Th), May 1 (Th), May May 6 (Tu) June 3 (Tu) Major reading assignments will be drawn from the following key books and other sources listed in the following sections.

The books by Malthus, Schultz and Ciriacy-Wantrup are considered classic writings on population, food and environment.

Problems and Policies in World Population, Food and Environment: An Integrated Approach.World Resources Institute, World Resources 2000-01, People and Ecosystems: The Fraying Web of Life, Oxford University Press, NY, 2000.Tweeten, Research Methods and Communication in the Social Sciences, Praeger, Westport CN, 1994 (included in Reader).Essays on the Principle of Population, Penguin Publishers, 1983 5.Transforming Traditional Agriculture, Yale University Press, New Haven, CT, 1964.

Leathers The World Food Problem, Boulder, Lynne Reiner, 1999.Southgate, Graham, Tweeten, The World Food Economy, Blackwell Publish 2007.Resource Conservation: Economics and Policies, University of California, Berkeley, 1952.Green Markets: The Economics of Sustainable Development, ICS Press, San Francisco, 1993.* recommended purchase from Zip Publishing plus CD for other core readings.283 Topics by Weeks Weeks 1-2 Introduction to Population, Food, Environment and Methods -Course objectives, grading, class participation, definitions, concepts -Current global views, issues, trends and interdependence Historical explanations -Classical and neoclassical economists -Natural scientists Means - End Scheme Developing Country Overview by Continent Introduction to Scientific Method Problem definition, objectives Hypothsis formulation and testing, data analysis Videos:"Dealing with Interdependence" and "Reversing the Spiral" Reading Assignments: +1., “Populations, Food and Knowledge”, Amer Econ Rev 90:1,p1-14.

Ciriacy Wantrup, "Emergence of the Problem," Chapter 1.Panayotou, Green Markets: Economics of Sus."The Triple Global Challenge: Hunger, Environmental Degradation and Population Growth," Global Research on the Environment and Ag Nexus, pp.Preface and Chapters 1, 8 and Appendix F, Concepts and Cases Reader and Chapters 10-15, Southgate Graham, Tweeten.“Artistic Research Tools for Scientific Minds,” AJAE, Feb 1979, pp 1-11.

Gebremedhin and Tweeten, Research Methods, Appendix E, Reader.“On Being a Scientist,” National Academy Press, Wash DC.Key Demographic Concepts and Population Issues -Malthus' hypothesis -demographic variables/equation -computing growth rate -demographic transition, momentum -increase in urban population -rural-to-urban migration -international migration -future population dynamics and projections -reducing birth rates (options) -special problems in low income countries, e.gender, AIDs, aging -interlinkages with food and environment Videos: "World Population”, "Demography," Reading Assignments: +1.Foster and Leathers, Ch 7 “It is Not Food vs Population,” pp.

“Context, Concepts and Policy on Poverty and Inequality,” ch.Quality in the Developing World, CRC Press.“Global Population Trends: The Prospects for Stabilization,” Resources, Issue 131, Spring 1998, pp.Mayone “Population, Projections and Policy: A Cautionary Perspective,” EPAT/MUCIA-Research Training, No 12 June 1994, pp.World Food Consumption, Production and Security Food Demand Considerations -population growth -income effects -price effects, substitution -purchasing power; food security and poverty -malnutrition and poverty -conflict between producer and consumer interests Food Supply Considerations -historical views on food production -overview of world food problems, producing regions -climate and soils -Schultz's hypothesis -Hayami and Ruttan's hypothesis -new seed varieties – The Green Revolution -energy, fertilizer, and other chemicals -irrigation and colonization - bio-technology -food policies in high vs.low income countries -The African Dilemma of the 1980s and 1990s - sustainability relative to ecology/environment Videos on "Green Revolution in Africa," "Privatizing Soviet Collectives," "Farming and Development in India," and "Quiet Revolution in LA" Reading Assignments: 1.

Schultz, Transforming Traditional Agriculture.Chapters 3 and 4, Concepts and Cases Reader.Foster and Leathers, World Food Problem • food demand and supply, chps.

1, 8, 10, 11 • hunger and food security, chps.

Tshibaka, "Some Key Issues on Agricultural Production in Africa: An Overview" and Braun V.Joachim, "Food Security Challenges in Africa Under Structural Change: An Overview" in STRUCTURAL CHANGE IN AFRICAN AGRICULTURE.Mancur Olson, "Agricultural Exploitation and Subsidization, There is an Explanation," in CHOICES Fourth Quarter 1990.Yujiro Hayami, "Assessment of the Green Revolution," AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE 3rd WORLD, Ch.286 Weeks 6-8 Environmental Concepts and Issues Related to Population and Food Classification, Ecology of Natural Resources/Environment - stock vs.flow resources - flow resources with threshold - carrying capacity, safe minimum standard (SMS) - environmental service flows - materials balance, energy flow accounting - stability of eco-systems, biodiversity - taxonomy of ag and environment Environmental Economic Concepts - property rights/entitlements and tenancy - private vs.

social costs - externalities - marginal social product - extra and non-market values - intergenerational allocation - economics of sustainability Philippines Contemporary Environmental Issues, Policy Options - deforestation - soil erosion - endangered species - water quantity, quality - global warming - clean, sustainable energy - property rights changes - monetary penalties and rewards - cap and trade - non-monetary policy options - country cases e.Africa, Egypt, Puerto Rico, Videos: "Our Threatened Heritage", "Principles of Ecology", “Rondonia: End of Road”, "Trees of Hope" and "Biodiversity and Development" Reading Assignments: +1.Ciriacy-Wantrup, Resource Conservation: Economics and Policies.

, Siegfried vonCiriacy – Wantrup and His Safe Minimum Standard of Conservation,” A Profile, Choices, Fourth Quarter, 1997, pp.Panayotou, Green Markets: The Economics of Sustainable Development.Chapters 5 & 6, Concepts and Cases Reader."When Prices Miss the Mark: Methods of Evaluating Environmental Change," EPAT/MUCIA Policy Brief, #3, Aug 1993.A Mutidisplinary Approach to Renewable Energy in Developing Countries, Chps 1 & 15, Publishing Horizons, 1987.

The Environmental Data Book: A Guide to Statistics on the Environment and Development, The World Bank, Washington D.Mainstreaming the Environment, The World Bank Group and The Environment Since the Rio Earth Summit, Washington, D.Environment Matters at the World Bank: Climate Change and Adaptation, Wash.288 Weeks 9-10 Integration and Summing Up - main points of interdependence and causation - general political and policy environment - policy making options -policy recommendations/implementation - case study summations - student oral reports on methods and findings Videos: "Neighborhood of the Coelhos" & "Conditions for Communities and Sustainable Forestry" and “Reversing the Spiral” (2nd half) Reading Assignments: 1.

“The Problem of Causation,” Ch 7, Scientific Analysis.Panayotou, Green Markets: The Economics of Sustainable Development.

Our Common Future, World Commission on Environment and Development, Foreword and Overview, pp, xiv-xv and 1-23.Paarlberg, Robert, Countrysides at Risk: The Political Geography of Sustainable Agriculture.Policy “forward & Executive Summary” Essay #16, Overseas Development Council, Washington, D."The Proposed GREAN Initiative," Global Research on Environment and Ag Nexus, pp.The Global Research Agenda: A South-North Perspective, IDRC, pp.Grindle and Thomas, "Generalizing about LDC Policy Environments" and "Implementing Reform," pp.“The Quest of the Political: The Political Economy of Development Policy Making,” Frontiers of Development Economics: The Future in Perspective, Gerald M.Stiglitz (Editors), World Bank and Oxford University Press, pp.Academic Misconduct: It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).

For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( /info for students/ ).Disability Statement: Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, YDD 292-0901; /.289 + = Core readings for problem sets and paper.

Other readings (on reserve in Main Library) are supplementary and honors students are expected to read selectively from them depending on background and interests.

Core readings available in Concepts and Cases Reader and CD from Zip LARCH 597: Environmental Stewardship Course Syllabus Spring Quarter, 2008 Professor John Simpson GENERAL DESCRIPTION AND COURSE GOALS LARCH 597 is a 5­credit undergraduate lecture course satisfying the university General Education Curriculum (GEC) requirement for a Capstone Course.The course is open to all OSU students with senior standing.LARCH 597 explores stewardship issues associated with environmental management in the U.In so doing, it considers the cultural, ecological, economic, ethical, and political implications of alternate stewardship values, particularly in light of their historical development.However, the course is neither an environmental history course nor a course specifically about environmental ethics or philosophy.Rather, it focuses on practical issues in the real world.

The course sensitizes participants to the range of implications associated with decisions that govern the way our environmental resources are utilized and challenges each individual to confront and consider his/her personal stewardship values.The general goals of LARCH 597 are: 1) to enable the participant to understand and critically evaluate contemporary environmental management issues in light of the economic, ecological, political, socio­cultural and ethical values that shape them; 2) to develop the participant's awareness of and appreciation for the range of stewardship values used by different socio­cultural groups in selecting courses of action in response to these issues; 290 3) to foster the development of the participant's personal stewardship values regarding environmental and social issues of critical concern; 4) to foster the participant's ability to articulate his/her values in a coherent and informed manner both orally and in writing; 5) to encourage the participant to participate in the public debate and democratic process regarding these critical issues; and, 6) to suggest appropriate, tangible ways the participant throughout his/her life, as an individual or a member of a group, can respond meaningfully to these issues.LARCH 597 meets daily for lecture and discussion.Class is designed to stimulate active participation and discussion via a series of role­playing exercises that simulate contemporary stewardship issues.These exercises, and the issues they explore, form the heart of the course and reflect its pedagogical philosophy: the formation of personal stewardship values is best facilitated through the close examination and active debate of alternate values.

Consequently, regular attendance is critical.The class greatly benefits from the range of its participants’ backgrounds and academic majors; however, due to this diversity, familiarity with the general course content varies among participants.Yet each participant is responsible for all course content.EVALUATION METHODS AND COURSE POLICIES Course grades will be based on: two reading responses; the completion of class exercises; and on regular attendance and active participation.The reading responses are four pages, single spaced, typed papers that document your understanding of the material, provide an application of the book’s principle ideas, and express your interpretation of and reaction to them.

Further instructions will be given in class.Other graded components will have a separate problem statement distributed when the assignment is made.All course materials are available in CARMEN.Any evidence of academic misconduct throughout the course will initiate standard university procedures as specified in the Code of Student Conduct.Each graded component is worth a designated number of points as indicated below.

At the conclusion of the course, the total number of points each student has received will be calculated along with an arithmetic class average.Grade ranges then will be established in accordance with Faculty Rule 3335­7­21 that sets university standards for marks; a description of the rule also can be found in the University Bulletin.No extra credit points are available in this class.Submission deadlines and treatment of late work are always an issue in this class due to the range of academic backgrounds represented in the class and the variance in how these matters are handled throughout the university.Therefore, the class follows the most fair and most practical way of handling them: all assignments are due at the designated time.

No late work will be accepted without valid, extenuating circumstances—circumstances that were unforeseen and uncontrollable.While a personal 291 injury or illness is acceptable, the circumstance must be documented by a note from a physician."I had to work," "I just didn't get it done," "I forgot," "I overslept," or "I was in Florida on a job interview" are not acceptable circumstances.Dates Course Component all quarter 100 all quarter 200 Participation 3/28 - 5/09 200 Constituent Letters 4/4 - 4/23 Landfill-NIMBY Exercise 50 4/28 - 5/7 Fishing Exercise 50 Points Attendance all quarter Reading Responses (200 pts.each) 400 Total Available Points 1000 A make up assignment or exercise will be given only under the following conditions.

First, the regularly scheduled component was missed due to extraordinary circumstances unforeseen and unavoidable by the student, such as serious personal illness or a family crisis (job related circumstances will not be accepted).Second, in the event of a crisis, either the student, a doctor, or family member must notify the instructor of the problem in a timely manner (not several days after the fact)—explicit messages left through the School office are acceptable if the instructor cannot be reached directly.Third, at the earliest appropriate time, the student must meet with the instructor to verify the crisis with a signed note from the doctor, a family membe, or clergy that details the circumstances.If the instructor accepts the circumstances as valid, a make­up will then be scheduled at the earliest appropriate time.Should a crisis preclude the student from completing the course, an Incomplete will be granted only under the same provisions outlined above.

In addition, the student must have completed one­half of the course as measured by total points available prior to 5:00 P.The remainder of the course work must be completed before 5:00 P.The required readings are available at some OSU libraries and local bookstores and from online booksellers.The required readings are: Simpson, John Warfield.

Dam! Water, Power, Politics, and Preservation in Hetch Hetchy and Yosemite National Park.

Reading lists for the Reading Responses.Read one from A and one from B: A 292 Pollan, Michael.The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A natural history of four meals.Supercapitalism: The transformation of business, democracy, and everyday life .Encounters with the Archdruid: Narratives about a Conservationist and three of his Natural Enemies.

You are encouraged to familiarize yourself with the following books as well; significant course background is drawn from them: Simpson, John Warfield.

Yearning for the Land: A Search for Homeland in Scotland and America.Vision of Paradise: Glimpses of Our Landscape's Legacy.Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.

If you want to see me outside class, just come up after class to schedule an appointment; otherwise, the best way of accessing me outside class is via email at: email protected My office is 233 Knowlton; 292­8395.CALENDAR OF CLASS TOPICS Date Day Topic 3/24 3/25 3/26 3/27 3/28 M: T: W: R: F: Course introduction Stewardship code of conduct (in­class exercise): self assessment of personal values Lifeboat ethics (in­class exercise & discussion) Generic human effects on the environment Assign Constituent Letters 3/31 4/1 4/2 4/3 4/4 M: T: W: R: F: What is environmental stewardship? definition & discussion The global imperative and population dynamics Somalithopia (in­class exercise) Pollution & the tragedy of the commons Introduce Landfill­NIMBY Exercise 293 4/7 4/8 4/09 4/10 4/11 M: T: W: R: F: Paradise defined (in class exercise) Defining wilderness vs.Euro­ American 19th century landscape/stewardship values Jefferson vs.Hamilton: competing visions for the country Yearning for the Land: the immigrant experience 4/14 4/15 4/16 4/17 4/18 M: T: W: R: F: Personal Role Statement due; Ownership and rootedness (cont.Powell’s Arid Lands Report Landfill Public Forum #1 Private property and land use controls (zoning) The multinational corporation & supercapitalism 4/21 4/22 4/23 4/24 4/25 M: T: W: R: F: Revised Pay­off Matrix Due; the bet on scarcity; dealing with uncertainty Bhopal & Exxon Valdiz, who is to blame? Landfill Public Forum #2; Final Vote and summary discussion Stewardship & politics; If I Were President (in­class exercise) Continue national budget discussion; is American the ‘greatest’ country? 4/28 4/29 4/30 5/1 5/2 M: T: W: R: F: Introduce Fishing Exercise; first decision point Role Statement due; expansion of environmental rights: Leopold's land ethic First Diary Entry Due; decision point; legislative and judicial reactions; NEPA/EISs Sierra vs.Morton Entry #2 Due; decision point; ecofeminism, deep ecology 5/5 5/6 5/7 5/8 5/09 M: T: W: R: F: Entry #3 Due; final decision point; summary discussion setting the national environmental agenda; strip mining Final Diary Due; The problem w/science; old and new paradigms Alternate ways of ‘knowing’ Constituent Letters Due; China by comparison 5/12 5/13 5/14 5/15 5/16 M: T: W: R: F: A tale of two parks Muir (‘preservation’ for pleasure­seeking) vs.

Pinchot (Progressive­era conservation) Dam! Dam! (cont.’d) Our national parks: managing the public domain today 5/19 5/20 5/21 5/22 5/23 M: T: W: R: F: Stewardship & our auto­oriented landscape and consumption­based lifestyle American vs.international urbanity: the 3 d’s: density, diversity, and detail suburbia defined; a conceptual model of sub/urban form economic issues of (sub)urban form 19th century origins of the American suburban landscape 5/26 5/27 M: T: MEMORIAL DAY, NO CLASSES Columbus’s development history 294 5/28 5/29 5/30 W: R: F: Post WW­II commercial and residential landscapes Our stewardship obligation to future generations (Re)defining your stewardship code of conduct Environment & Natural Resources 367, Landscape Architecture 367: Professor John Simpson The Making and Meaning of the American Landscape COURSE SYLLABUS If we want to understand ourselves, we would do well to take a searching look at our landscapes.Peirce Lewis, 1979 We all share a rich legacy: our landscape.It is our heritage made visible for each landscape records the forces, both physical and human, that shaped it.

Each is unique for those forces vary endlessly in a wonderful form of life­giving alchemy.The landscape is often our autobiography as we imprint it with our actions, values, policies, and programs.Some imprints last for centuries, others are erased and rewritten more rapidly, leaving behind a complex layering of messages—past and present, physical and cultural, public and private, local and national, legal and moral, rational and emotional, aesthetic and economic, Euro­American and Native American.These messages tell a story of many meanings, written by many hands, that reveals the past, explains the present, and foreshadows the future.It is a partly factual and partly anecdotal story because the landscape is both objective and subjective.

ENR/LARCH 367 is a 5 credit undergraduate lecture/recitation course satisfying the Culture and Ideas requirement in the university General Education Curriculum (GEC) and the second Writing­in­the­ Curriculum GEC requirement.The course is open to and designed for all undergraduates; its only prerequisite is completion of the first Writing­in­the­Curriculum GEC requirement (English 110, 111, or equivalent).The class meets on M/W/F at 10:30 PM in Knowlton #250 for lecture given by the course instructor and it meets in sections of not more than 25 students for recitation on T/R conducted by a graduate teaching assistant.Through lectures, assigned readings, recitation discussion, and writing assignments, we’ll explore and interpret significant forces that shaped the American landscape.

These 295 economic, environmental, political, and socio-cultural forces will be examined in their historical as well as their contemporary contexts.We’ll examine broad national policies and programs that shaped the general landscape and the idiosyncratic forces specific to a local area.In so doing we’ll trace the development of an agrarian landscape from the "wilderness" encountered by Euro-American pioneers as settlement progressed westward of the Appalachian Mountains and the later evolution of the city into the contemporary suburban landscape.The Midwest and central Ohio will be used as case studies to illustrate the interplay of national forces and themes with local forces and themes.

Through this examination the course seeks to instill a set of values and analytical skills transferable to the study of other landscapes.

The course’s dual designation has a profound effect on the course design and delivery.The lecture component primarily satisfies the Culture and Ideas designation, and, hence, is taught much like a history course in which class time is used to illuminate the meaning of the content presented in the assigned readings rather than on the repetition of key factual material contained in the readings.“Lectures” are informal and focus on a wide ranging exploration and interpretation of the readings from the instructor’s viewpoint.Slides and videos are used frequently to illustrate major themes.Recitation focuses on the writing component of the class, providing in­class writing instruction and writing activities responsive to requirements set by the Writing­in­the­Curriculum sequence, while also providing a limited opportunity to discuss issues and questions raised in lectures.

In addition, background readings assigned in support of the writing component are discussed in terms of approach, point of view, content, and style.Recitations also provide in­class instruction and opportunities to develop oral communication skills.Active participation and dialogue are emphasized and facilitated.The connection that binds together the two components— lecture and recitation—is the joint emphasis on the making and meaning of the landscape.Beyond that general thematic linkage, the lectures and the recitation activities are separate.

The general learning goals of ENR/LARCH 367 are: 1) to enable the student to better perceive, understand, and interpret the contemporary American landscape as the product of a gradual developmental process involving the interaction of many physical forces, public policies and programs, and socio­cultural values; 2) to facilitate the student's development of a personal ethic toward the landscape that is responsive to America’s cultural and biophysical diversity; 3) to refine the student's ability to think critically and creatively and to express those thoughts effectively in oral and written form: to formulate a question or opinion; to structure supporting evidence and arguments; and to effectively express resulting beliefs verbally and in writing.EVALUATION METHODS AND COURSE POLICIES Course grades will be based on the following components: • Every student will complete a midterm and a comprehensive final examination, both in essay format.The midterm will consist of one essay question you choose to answer from a set of three selected by the 296 instructor from the study set included below.The final will consist of two questions.The first will be a question you choose to answer from a set of three selected by the instructor from the study set below, covering the content since the midterm.

The second will be a question you choose to answer from a set of three comprehensive questions selected by the instructor from the study set.All tests are closed book — no notes or other reference materials may be used during the tests.Any evidence of academic misconduct will trigger standard university procedures as specified in the Code of Student Conduct.As essays, the tests provide opportunities for developing and displaying writing skills, in addition to demonstrating knowledge of the course content.The graduate teaching assistants, under the instructor's supervision, will grade the tests based on: the recall of pertinent facts (dates, people, events, actions ­ outcomes, etc.

) from the lectures, readings and other class components; this will constitute approximately 65% of the overall test grade; your ability to interconnect and interpret the material; this will constitute approximately 20% of the overall test grade; and, the quality and effectiveness of your response as a piece of expository writing; this will constitute approximately 15% of the overall test grade.Every test answer will be read and graded by two TAs, working independently, based on a set of general grading criteria that identifies major ideas, themes, and key facts that should be discussed in the response.These two grades will then be averaged to determine the actual grade received.Should the two grades differ by more than 10%, then the test will be read and graded by a third TA and the two highest of the three grades will be averaged to determine the final grade.297 • Every student will write a short (circa 1,250 words) response to a contemporary landscape issue.

This may focus on a controversy regarding a local, state, or federal land use policy or program, the management practices of a specific place, or some general philosophical debate concerning the landscape.The essay should describe the issue, outline the range of positions, and present evidence and arguments in support of your opinion.Supplemental reading and research into the issue will inform the paper.Drafts of the papers will be exchanged in recitation and the set discussed in terms of approach, point of view, content, and style, before final submission.The graduate teaching assistants, under the instructor's supervision, will grade the submissions.

NOTE: a complete, well­crafted draft must be submitted and the assigned editing on another person’s paper completed according to requirements to receive full credit for the final paper; failure to do so will result in the final grade being reduced up to 20% of the points possible for the assignment.• Every student will write a moderate length (circa 2,500 words) descriptive analysis of a specific landscape (a single site, area, or community), landscape element (the house, yard, garage, fence, town square, main street, strip, highway, farm, barn, etc.), or policy/program (farm policy, zoning, subdivision regulations, sign codes, architectural standards, highway and mass transit programs, etc.) that affects the landscape's physical character or socio-cultural meaning.The nature of the analysis may be primarily historical (explaining the physical and socio-cultural forces that shaped the landscape), or interpretative of the contemporary landscape (assessing the meaning we might assign to it).

Library and/or field research into the issue will inform the paper.The graduate teaching assistants, under the instructor's supervision, will grade the submissions.NOTE: a complete, well-crafted draft must be submitted and the assigned editing on another person’s paper completed according to requirements to receive full credit for the final paper; failure to do so will result in the final grade being reduced up to 20% of the points possible for the assignment.• Lastly, every student will be evaluated for effective participation in recitation, including the frequency of attendance, the level and effectiveness of participation in discussion and the debate, and the quality of your in-class writing exercises and other class activities.The graduate teaching assistants, under the instructor's supervision, will evaluate student participation.

Each course component is worth a designated number of points as indicated below.At the conclusion of the course, the total number of points each student has received will be calculated along with an arithmetic class average.Grade ranges then will be established in accordance with Faculty Rule 3335­7­21, which defines the University standard for marks.As per this standard and past course experience, the average grade will likely fall in the high “C” to low “B” range.This means most students will receive a “C+” or “B­” for the class, although course grades are not set to a pre­established curve and every effort is made to adjust the overall class grade range to fairly reflect the outcome of this particular course offering.

Grades are established in part on an absolute scale in which you’re evaluated in comparison to our expectations and in part on a comparative scale in which you’re evaluated against your peers.No extra credit points are available in this course.Component Possible Points 298 Midterm Exam 150 pts.Finals may be picked­up from the course instructor at the conclusion of finals week or you can give me a self­addressed stamped envelope and I will mail it to you.299 Submission of Late Work Work is due at the designated time.

If you're not satisfied with your work at the due date, submit it any way.NO LATE WORK WILL BE ACCEPTED WITHOUT EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES APPROVED BY YOUR TA OR THE COURSE INSTRUCTOR.These include unforeseen or unavoidable circumstances such as a personal illness that results in a physician's care or some other crisis.It does not include, "I overslept," "I had to work," "I had two other papers due that day," "I just wasn't done," or "I forgot.

" If some reasonable complication precludes you from completing and submitting your work on time, contact your TA or the course instructor immediately to explain the situation and make alternate arrangements.Missed Tests and Assignments From time to time, legitimate circumstances complicate our lives and necessitate adjustments in our activities.When such circumstances arise, we try to work with you to establish an appropriate and reasonable response to your specific situation.This usually results in either a make-up exam or assignment, or an Incomplete; but you have to be mature and considerate in your conduct toward the course and the university.In all cases, prompt communication is required.

As soon as a compromising situation arises, let use know.We can't respond to your situation if we don't know about it.The most common mistake students make when such a situation arises is that they wait too long to seek assistance, thus compounding the problem.Make­up tests and assignments may be given under the following conditions: (1) the regularly scheduled activity was missed due to an unforeseen and unavoidable circumstance, such as serious personal illness or crisis (job related circumstances usually will not be accepted); (2) in the event of a crisis, either the student, a doctor, or family member must notify the instructor of the problem in a timely manner (not a week after the fact); explicit messages left through the School office are acceptable if the instructor cannot be reached directly; and (3) at the earliest appropriate time, the student must meet with the instructor to verify the circumstance, and, provided the instructor accepts the circumstances as valid, to schedule the make­up.We assume if you're sick enough to miss a test or assignment, you're sick enough to go to a doctor.

Should the crisis preclude the student from completing the course, an Incomplete may be granted, but only under the same provisions for extraordinary circumstances and for notification, verification, and rescheduling outlined above.In addition, the student must have completed the majority of course work, as measured by the percent of available points, prior to 5:00 PM, the last day of classes.The remainder of the course work must be completed before 5:00 PM, of the fifth Friday of the next quarter.If the student is unable to complete the majority of the course work during the quarter, s/he should withdraw from the course rather than seek an Incomplete.Should you encounter personal problems during the quarter or simply wish to discuss the course in greater detail drop by during office hours (233 KnowltonHall; M/W immediately after class), or call for an appointment (292­8395).

The best way to contact me outside of class or office hours is by E­mail to email protected 300 Office hours and E­mail addresses for the Graduate Teaching Assistants will be announced in recitation sections.This class, like Ohio State in general, will be as personal or as impersonal as you care to make it.301 READINGS The following materials are required.Copies may be purchased at campus bookstores or from local bookstores and online booksellers.

The materials are also on closed reserve in the Knowlton and AG libraries.Visions of Paradise: glimpses of our landscape's legacy.

(Berkeley: University of California Press).Yearning for the Land: a search for homeland in Scotland and America (New York: Vintage Books).The hardcover version is identical, just more expensive: Yearning for the Land: a search for the important of place (New York: Pantheon Books, 2002) • ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­.Dam! water, power, politics, and preservation in Hetch Hetchy and Yosemite National Park (New York: Pantheon Books).The following recitation ‘text’ is encouraged as excerpts will be read and discussed.You’ll be able to read the excerpts on CARMEN.

If you care to purchase your own copy of the book, which is no longer in print, used copies may be found online and in campus bookstores.However, purchase of the book is not required for the course.Being in the World: an environmental reader for writers (New York: MacMillan).

For those who wish further detail, optional readings are also made available from the following sources on closed reserve: • Conzen, Michael, ed.The Making of the American Landscape (New York: Routledge).Major Problems in American Environmental History: documents and essays (Lexington: D.Additional Sources (some available on closed reserve) include: • The Everyday Writer by Andrea Lunsford and Robert Connors, a standard text used by the English Department in English 110 and other courses, so many of you may already be familiar with it.It's also readily available at campus bookstores.

Use it as a reference to answer specific questions regarding technical writing issues as well as for general advice and guidance on structure and style.It serves as the standard in this course.• Norton Book of Nature Writing (Elder and Finch, eds.; 1990) and Bergon's much shorter collection of historically significant writing about wilderness/nature, The Wilderness Reader (University of Nevada Press, 1994), are excellent anthologies of nature writing that might be of value as a reference on the writing assignments.They also provide good supplements to components of the course content.

• Roderick Nash's widely used American Environmentalism: Readings in Conservation History (McGraw Hill, 3rd ed., 1990), like Conzen and Merchant, is a good supplement to the course lecture content.It also includes excerpts from outstanding nature writing that might serve as useful models for the writing assignments.302 • John Hanson Mitchell’s Trespassing (Addison Wesley, 1998) provides a fascinating examination of the many issues related to property rights, both historically and currently, using a community outside Boston.• William Cronon’s Nature’s Metropolis (Norton, 1991) explores the development of Chicago from an environmental history perspective similar to that used in this course.

• John Stilgoe’s Outside Lies Magic (Walker, 1998) shares the joys to be gained from walking or riding around the local landscape in search of clues to the landscape’s legacy.• Grady Clay’s Real Places (University of Chicago, 1994) examines the vernacular urban and suburban landscapes in a witty and insightful manner.303 THE WRITING COMPONENTS Development of your writing skills is central to this class.As you know, writing proficiency is among the most fundamental skills of an educated person and among the most important abilities for daily professional and personal life.Yet writing is work for even the most talented and experienced.

Few authors produce quality writing without careful preparation, diligent editing, and repeated revision.Since writing is partly creative and partly mechanical, like most skills, it cannot be taught in the sense that you can simply listen to lectures and read books on the subject to fully develop your abilities—your skill and comfort improve with practice and guidance.Hence, we’ll serve more as your writing “coaches” or “advisors” than as your “instructors” in the classic academic sense.To refine your writing skills, you’ll read, discuss, and respond in writing to literary nonfiction and scholarly nonfiction works related to the course subject.Your written responses will include creative narrative and analysis, scholarly narrative, and critical analysis.

Preparation time will range from immediate in­class responses to exam questions and exercises, to moderate time frames of about three weeks.The length of the response will range from a very short response of less than 500 words on the exams and exercises, to 1,250 words on the short assignment, to a moderate length response of 2,500 words on the longer landscape analysis assignment.In­class exercises will be critiqued and discussed by classmates.Draft submissions for each writing assignment will be discussed as a set in recitation, and subsequently copied and distributed to other recitation classmates for detailed discussion.

The TAs also will mark drafts with suggestions for improvement before the final submission.Evaluation Criteria Each writing assignment, other than exams, will be evaluated on the following general criteria: Criteria % of Points Allocated Quality of content 50% Effectiveness of style 15% Technical writing quality 25% Submission standards 10% Total 100% Quality of content includes the clarity of your main points, the quality of the supporting arguments and evidence, and the overall level of insight.Effectiveness of style refers to the manner in which language and structure are used to create an appropriate and engaging tone that communicates your message and meaning.Technical writing quality focuses on proper paragraph and sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, use of citations, and bibliography format.Submission standards evaluate your adherence to the specifications listed below.

Submission Standards 304 To enable us to concentrate on your content, style, and overall writing effectiveness, and not be bothered by incidental differences in format, each submission must adhere to the specific format requirements set by your recitation TA.These standards will be discussed in recitation before the first writing assignment.Writing Hints and Suggestions Experience has shown the most common problems on the exams are, in descending order of frequency and seriousness: • The response did not answer the question.Instead, it gave unwanted or irrelevant material.Make sure you understand what the question asks and then provide the responsive material.

• The response did not include sufficient detail.Generalities are fine, but detail and specifics matter! They distinguish superior knowledge and recall from the average.• The response contained inaccurate material.This is a relatively rare problem, but when it occurs, it obviously undermines your response.

• Many technical writing errors plagued the response.

Again, this is relatively rare, but problems with overall organization, paragraph and sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, etc., affect the quality of your response, which should tell a factual story in an engaging and articulate manner.Take 5 minutes to organize and design your response before you begin writing.It will be time well spent! Make an outline on the inside cover of your blue book.Begin the outline by re­phrasing the exam question as a thesis statement.

Refer to the statement during the construction of the quick outline or plan.Don’t pad your answer or use flowery language to impress.Write short, crisp sentences and paragraphs.Make every statement count; say it once, and move on–don’t repeat material.Length is not important; content is! In most cases, the best answers only run 6 to 8 pages (of the 16 in the booklet).

Successful responses to the three writing assignments share certain common characteristics: • They tell a complete story in compelling narrative form, a story with a beginning, a middle, and an end: an introduction, a body of evidence, and a conclusion.They are stories with a clear point or message supported by reasonable arguments.They are authoritative, but not dictatorial; they show and explain rather than tell and preach.• They have a clear sense of organization and structure that guides the reader.This is communicated in the introduction, and reinforced at several key points in the body.

Let the reader know what to expect so s/he can anticipate what comes next.Don’t lead them by the nose and don’t make them wander aimlessly through your thoughts.Yet, don’t treat them like children by repeating things unnecessarily or in juvenile terms.305 • They have an effective ‘hook’ in the introduction that captures the reader’s attention.The hook may be a controversial statement, an anecdote or analogy that illustrates your point in a manner the reader might relate to, or a vexing question or problem that tweaks their interest.

• They present sound, well structured arguments and evidence in support of your position, point, or message.The nature of your arguments will vary from assignment to assignment (obviously what constitutes an argument in the more creative narrative will differ from those in the more analytical critique).Formal arguments are presented as assertions (what you believe to be the case) supported by evidence in the form of quotes from experts, personal description, or anecdotal stories that illustrate a point.Informal arguments typically take the form of description that makes a case for some perception, reaction, or point of view.

Regardless of the form followed, your writing should avoid trite statements, generalizations, stereotypes, clich s, jargon, and unsupported assertions.• They have a definable style or tone that is appropriate for the assignment created by the use of language (adjectives, adverbs, sentence rhythm, paragraph structure), recurring theme, analogy, and allusion.Successful papers have a ‘voice’ in which the reader can hear the author speaking.They have a narrative drive that carries the reader forward.They have a smooth sequence of thoughts that build progressively to the conclusion, and have smooth transitions from one thought and subsection to the next.

• They have a conclusion with some punch that goes beyond mere regurgitation of the paper’s prior points, arguments, and themes.A note on plagiarism: We consider the inappropriate use of another’s work as your own as a very serious offense.Any sign of such academic misconduct will initiate university procedures specified in the Code of Conduct.If you have any questions on the proper use of another’s words or ideas in your work, see your TA and/or check The Everyday Writer for standards.BE FOREWARNED: YOU MUST CITE SOURCES PROPERLY IF YOU OBTAIN INFORMATION FROM THE WEB.

While the Web can be a useful aid in your search for material, DO NOT rely on it as the only source.It is NOT a substitute for good library research, and will NOT be accepted as such.Suggestions for Success: to make the course as enjoyable and meaningful as possible, we encourage you to, • Attend all classes—the importance of this cannot be overstated as the vast majority of people who have difficulty in this class do so because of infrequent attendance.• Prepare for lecture by having read in detail and made notes on the required reading prior to the class for which it was assigned.While we can't guarantee you'll find all the reading interesting, it is, nonetheless, important.

It’s very important to keep up as best you can.Don't expect all the reading material to be covered in lecture—much of it is background that enhances and augments the lectures and may not be directly discussed in class, yet the best answers on the exams will respond to it.306 • Place you personal feelings aside.Writing is both very personal, since we often express inner feelings, and very public, since others read them.In this way, it’s much like public speaking.

We often become defensive and sensitive to criticism, whether the criticism was offered as constructive or not.Try to be open to comments and, when making comments to others, try to avoid being critical of or insensitive to them as people.• Review lecture and reading notes with others in the class prior to the exams —form a study group with friends or those who sit near you.

The class has a lot of memorization (although we don't set out to make it that way, we still expect you to know facts and dates in addition to the general trends).

The best way we've found to do this is with a study group.• Don’t read and write in isolation! Discuss the readings and your papers with others while you’re working on them.Get feedback and comments both in recitation and outside class.• Actively participate during class—ask questions, be involved mentally.

We've learned over the years that there is a loose correlation between this and one's grade.QUESTION POOL FOR THE MIDTERM AND FINAL The course instructor will select three questions for the midterm exam from the following list; you will then select one of the three to answer on the exam.• Anne Spirn has written about the concept of ‘deep structure’—that for any landscape, there are a few fundamental physical and/or socio­cultural forces that most governed its development; consequently, they offer a useful guide to understanding of the landscape.I’ve proposed that two physical forces have been particularly important in the making of central Ohio: glaciation and plant succession.Describe how these forces shaped this landscape and how they continue to influence it today.

• Compare and contrast the landscape values held by James Kilbourne and Jonathan Alder, as representatives of Euro­Americans and Native Americans, respectively.• From soil exhaustion to forest and wildlife depletion, Euro­Americans devastated each ‘paradise’ landscape they encountered as settlement raced westward across the continent in the 1700s and 1800s.What landscape values and government policies contributed to this wholesale environmental change? • We saw a striking satellite image of central Ohio that illustrated the differing landscape philosophies of Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton.Describe each leader's philosophy and outline the means each used to shape the nation before, during, and after the Washington administration.How are their philosophies and the means they used to implement them visible in our landscape today? • Discuss the sequence of steps that resulted in permanent Euro­American settlement on the Great Plains.

307 • Why was America so obsessed with western expansion despite the many environmental obstacles? Describe the principal attitudes and philosophies affecting westward expansion across the continent in the 1800s.• Describe how continental America might have differed had it been colonized and settled by Europeans from the west coast progressing eastward, rather than from the east coast progressing westward.• Describe the physical and socio­cultural factors that most differentiated John Muir’s Old World boyhood home from his New World boyhood home.What meanings can be seen in these differences today? • Discuss John Muir’s immigration experience and the motives underlying it, from Old World to New, and then westward across the continent.• Describe John Wesley Powell’s alternate vision for western settlement and development and explain why it was, for the most part, ignored.

• What was Frederick Jackson Turner's Frontier Thesis and how was it the product of 19th century American thinking about the West? How is it evident today? The course instructor will select three questions for part one of the final exam from the following list; you will then select one of the three to answer on the exam.• How did traditional American landscape values change throughout the 1800s? Begin by stating the core landscape values typified by James Kilbourne, then sketch incremental markers of change to those values, concluding with the Hetch Hetchy debate.• How did the emergence of scientific method and rational thinking change American environmental attitudes in the mid­1800s? Who were key contributors in this shift in popular thought? Does this paradigm still dominate public opinion about environmental stewardship? • Discuss how the establishment and initial management of Yellowstone National Park reflected 19th century American landscape values and perceptions.How are current public perceptions of park and NPS management practices affected by this legacy? • How have the concepts of preservation and conservation changed from the late 1800s to today and who have been the key advocates for each definition? • Discuss the arguments pro/con for the proposal to dam Hetch Hetchy, and explain how those arguments arose from the context of the times: the Conservation Movement and the Progressive Era.How do those arguments continue today in national policy debates over the public domain? 308 • The American landscape is based on the rational – scientific­based thinking of the Enlightenment perhaps more than that of any other large nation.

Yet such thinking may overlook some phenomenon that affect the human experience to which other ‘non­rational’ ways of thought are more open.Discuss how our landscape is a product of the Enlightenment and how alternate ways of ‘knowing’ may better respond to some phenomenon.• Explain how Olmsted's (and Vaux's) designs for Central Park and Riverside gave physical form to the suburban landscape aesthetic and social preferences emerging in the 19th century.How is this form visible today in residential developments, as well as apartment complexes, office and industrial parks, college campuses, and public parks? • How have local, state, and federal governments promoted suburbia, and what have been some of the key socio­cultural and urban costs of this preferential treatment? • Discuss the role of the courts in shaping our landscape since WW­II.How has this role complimented or been at odds with environmental legislation? • Compare and contrast the ‘walking city form,’ ‘streetcar form,’ and ‘auto­oriented form’ for the city of Columbus.

What physical forces, social policies and programs, and landscape values shaped those forms? The course instructor will select three questions for part two of the final exam from the following list; you will then select one of the three to answer on the exam.• Define ‘ceremonial time’ and ‘landscape literacy’ and apply the concepts to the central Ohio landscape.No concept has shaped the American landscape more.Explain its influence on our physical and socio-cultural landscapes.

• From the Treaty of Paris in 1783 until the Depression era, the government sought to rid itself of the public domain.

Best college essay writing service allcollegeessays

• Discuss how consideration of land and the environment as commodities, as (private) property, have shaped the American landscape.• Describe how perception of the New World as a vacant, virgin land, as a ‘blank slate’ free from the historical bonds that tethered the Old World to its thousand­year settlement past, shaped the development of the American landscape.

309 • Define and discuss ‘stewardship’ as presented in class and trace the development of it as both a goal and behavior over the past 200 years single semester, student interns can earn three credit hours for 150 hours of internship work; two   ecology, and science and technology studies.   You may do so by meeting with me during office hours or via email. Please refer to the “FAQ” section of UTC Learn for further information. I will do my very best to respond to  .309 • Define and discuss ‘stewardship’ as presented in class and trace the development of it as both a goal and behavior over the past 200 years.

310 DAILY LECTURE CALENDAR Date Day Readings Topic Assigned V = Visions of Paradise; Y = Yearning for the Land; D = Dam!; # = Carmen 3/24 3/26 3/28 39­42 M W F Course introduction, ceremonial time & landscape literacy Deep structure: time lines, glaciation (cont.’d): soils, hydrology, vegetation, wildlife V, 1­9; 203­206 #1 #2; V, 3/31 4/2 4/4 M W F Native American values: Scoouva & Jonathan Alder Euro­American values: James Kilbourne Grand design: Continental Congress, VMD, the grid V, 11­29 4/7 4/9 115 4/11 M W (cont.’d) Jefferson & Hamilton Imperial and imperialistic motives for western exploration & expansion F The immigrant experience: John Muir’s Old and New Worlds Y, 3­174 4/14 4/16 4/18 M W F (cont Write my ecology coursework confidentially College 8 pages / 2200 words Proofreading Business.’d) Jefferson & Hamilton Imperial and imperialistic motives for western exploration & expansion F The immigrant experience: John Muir’s Old and New Worlds Y, 3­174 4/14 4/16 4/18 M W F (cont.’d) Turner’s ‘Frontier Thesis’ and Powell’s “Arid Lands Report” The Battle for the Great Plains (58 min.

video) Y, 175­281 V, 116­136 4/21 4/23 151 4/25 176 M W Midterm 19th century changes in environmental attitudes V, 137­ F Wilderness ‘preservation’ for pleasure seeking: V, 165­ V, 30­37 V, 43­64 V, 65­ Yellowstone National Park 4/28 4/30 325 5/2 M W Muir & Pinchot: Hetch Hetchy, then Politics and environment: Hetch Hetchy, now F Wild by Law (58 min.video) 5/5 5/7 235 5/9 245 M W Carson’s ‘web of life’ Litigating Leopold's land ethic: NEPA & EIS, Sierra v.Morton V, 207­ F The dance of legislation: strip mine regulation V, 236­ 311 D, 1­181 D, 182­ 5/12 5/14 5/16 313 M W F Alternate views: science v.‘non­rational’ ways of knowing China, by comparison Defining the suburban style 5/19 339 5/21 5/23 M A conceptual model of city form V, 314­ W F Columbus (sub)urban growth (Cont.

bus ride #3 5/26 5/28 5/30 M W F Memorial Day, No Classes Post WW­II auto­oriented housing and commercial landscapes The 3­Ds of urbanity: density, diversity, detail 6/4 W V, 247­251 V, 253­ V, 341­3 Final Exam in Knowlton #250, 9:30 AM – 11:18 AM 312 GENERAL RECITATION CALENDAR (each TA may make some adjustments) Date Day Topic 3/25 3/27 T R Paradise defined: an in­class discussion; homework: read assigned stories Assign issue paper; form discussion circles and discuss characteristics of effective class participation; discuss characteristics of good descriptive and analytical writing using the assigned readings as guides to examine different approaches, points of view, types of content, styles of evidence/argument, and narrative styles; homework: walk the Olentangy bikepath between King Ave.and Olentangy Village (just north of the Olentangy Wetlands) and read assigned stories 4/1 T landscape Library research methods and Writing Center; homework: read assigned stories on issues Continue discussion of effective writing, including types with short preparation times such as the in­class assignments and exams, using the assigned readings as guides; discuss issue paper topics and characteristics, and discuss the Olentangy bikepath walk; homework: read assigned stories on landscape issues 4/3 R 4/8 T 4/10 R 4/15 4/17 T R In­class writing exercise #2: exam­like question midterm review 4/22 4/24 T R Continue work on paper and discussion of effective writing style Issue paper due 4/29 T 5/1 R Assign landscape analysis paper; discuss the characteristics of effective expository writing; homework: read assigned stories Discuss topics and characteristics of analysis papers; relate to readings 5/6 5/8 T R In­class writing exercise #3; homework: read assigned stories Analysis draft due; plan debate on contemporary urban form define and discuss stewardship, especially as related to urban and suburban life; homework: exchange drafts and write constructive comments 5/13 T 5/15 R Discuss strengths and weaknesses of draft papers in discussion circles; relate papers to the assigned readings; homework: ride High St.(this takes about 3 hours) Continue work on landscape analysis paper; homework: read assigned stories Issue Paper draft due; In­class writing exercise #1: response to bikepath walk; homework: exchange drafts and write constructive comments Discuss strengths and weaknesses of draft papers in discussion circles, relate papers to the assigned readings; homework: read assigned stories on landscape issues 313 5/20 In­class writing exercise #4: the meaning of contemporary urban form: analysis and interpretation of something seen on the transect of the city; homework: read assigned T stories 5/22 R 5/27 5/29 T R Analysis due; Continue preparations for debate: organize sides and arguments; homework: background reading on the urban form issue to be debate Debate: meaning of contemporary urban form Final exam review PHILOSOPHY 230 POLITICAL AND SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY Instructor: Don Hubin 337N University Hall email: email protected web page: /hubin1/ phone: 292-2505 Mondays 10:30 – 11:30, Tuesdays 3:30 – 4:30, and by appointment Texts: Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes (also available on Carmen) Second Treatise of Government, John Locke (also available on Carmen) The Myth of Ownership, Liam Murphy and Thomas Nagel Topic Outline and Readings: (Please note that I do not include reading assignment dates on the syllabus.

That is to allow our pace to be determined by class needs.I give reading assignments dates in class.In the unlikely event that you miss a class, please check the web site for current readings.Introduction Problem of Political Authority and Obligation Readings: Plato, Apology (all), Crito (all), Phaedo (Death Scene 115 – 118) Carmen Nature and Justification of Political Authority and Obligation Readings: Hobbes, pp.

27-35, 74-145 Available on Carmen, also Locke, all Available on Carmen, also ation: Economic Distribution and Social Justice A.Utilitarianism Readings: The Principles of Morals and Legislation (selections), Jeremy Bentham Carmen 2.Contractarianism Readings: A Theory of Justice (selections), John Rawls Carmen 3.Libertarianism Readings: Anarchy, State, and Utopia (selections), Robert Nozick Carmen B.

Taxation and the Myth of Ownership Readings: Murphy and Nagel, all Course Requirements: There will be one midterm exam and a final exam.The final exam will be in the room in which the class meets on Tue Dec 6 from 7:30 - 9:18 a.It will focus on material presented since the midterm but will depend on a general knowledge of material in the first portion of the course as well.

The final exam and the midterm will each constitute 35% of your grade.The date of the midterm exam is not yet set but it will probably be sometime in the fifth or early in the sixth week of the course and it will be announced repeatedly well in advance.The balance of your grade will be determined by a short (7-9 page) paper.This paper will be due during the last week of classes.The paper is to be a critical analysis of one or more of the arguments presented in the class, assigned readings or appropriately related readings.

Suggestions for paper topics will be handed out well in advance of due dates; however, you are invited to select topics not on that list provided you get the topic approved in advance Academic Misconduct The University understands academic misconduct to include “any activity which tends to compromise the academic integrity of the institution, or subvert the educational process” (“Procedures of the Committee on Academic Misconduct,” /procedures/ ).With respect to this course, examples include (but are not limited to) such actions as cheating on exams and submitting a term paper written by another.No one should be unclear about whether these are wrong, but students are sometimes not clear about what constitutes plagiarism.‘Plagiarism’ is defined by the University to be “the representation of another’s works or ideas as one’s own; it includes the unacknowledged word for word use and/or paraphrase of another person’s work, and/or the inappropriate unacknowledged use of another 315 person’s ideas”.There should be no misunderstanding about word for word transcriptions or simple paraphrases—these must be acknowledged through proper citations.

It is sometimes not clear, though, when simply using the ideas of another requires citation.This is especially true in the context of a course, in which one is, presumably acquiring fundamental ideas of a subject matter from the text or the instructor.Certain ideas are “in the public domain,” so to speak; they are ideas used by everyone working in the field, and do not require citation.Other ideas are such that their origin needs to be acknowledged.It is sometimes difficult for beginning students to distinguish these.

It is helpful to remember that what is at issue is whether the failure to acknowledge a source would tend to misrepresent the idea as your own.The failure to acknowledge your source for a distinction between civil disobedience and rebellion, for example, would not tend to misrepresent the distinction as your own since it is a distinction that anyone working in the field will draw in some way or other.To offer a specific account of this distinction that is offered by another without citing the source could easily tend to misrepresent the account as your own.It is clearly better to err on the side of over-acknowledgment in cases in which one is in doubt.I view academic misconduct of any sort as a very serious violation of University requirements.

University rules provide for extremely serious sanctions for academic misconduct, and I will, as I am required to do, forward any cases of suspected misconduct to the Committee on Academic Misconduct.Disability Services: Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office of Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated.They should inform me as soon as possible of their needs.The Office of Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; / PHILOSOPHY 230 POLITICAL AND SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY Instructor: Don Hubin 337N University Hall email: email protected web page: /philo/people/Faculty/hubin.1/ phone: 292-2505 Mondays 1:30 – 2:30, Thursdays 10:30 – 11:30, and by appointment 316 Texts: The Trial and Death of Socrates, Plato Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes Second Treatise of Government, John Locke Justice, Gender, and the Family, by Susan Moller Okin Topic Outline and Readings: V.

Introduction: Problems of Political Authority and Obligation Readings: Readings: Plato, iv-v, & 20-58 Recommended: Plato, 1-19 Nature and Justification of Political Authority and Obligation Readings: Hobbes, pp.Utilitarianism Readings: to be arranged 2.

Contractarianism Readings: to be arranged 3.

Libertarianism Readings: o be arranged B.Justice, Gender and the Family Readings: Okin, all Course Requirements: There will be one midterm exam and a final exam.The final exam will be in the room in which the class meets on Tuesday, Dec 9, from 9:30 - 11:18 AM (the time scheduled by the University).It will focus on material presented since the midterm but will depend on a general knowledge of material in the first portion of the course as well.The final exam and the midterm will each constitute 35% of your grade.

The date of the midterm exam is not yet set but it will probably be sometime in the fifth or early in the sixth week of the course and it will be announced repeatedly well in advance.The balance of your grade will be determined by a short (8-10 page) paper.This paper will be due during the last week of classes.The paper is to be a critical analysis of one or more of the arguments presented in the class, assigned readings or appropriately related readings.Suggestions for paper topics will be handed out well in advance of due dates; however, you are invited to select topics not on that list provided you get the topic approved in advance Academic Misconduct The University understands academic misconduct to include “any activity which tends to compromise the academic integrity of the institution, or subvert the educational process” (“Procedures of the Committee on Academic Misconduct,” /procedures/ ).

With respect to this course, examples include (but are not limited to) such actions as cheating on exams and submitting a term paper written by another.No one should be unclear about whether these are wrong, but students are sometimes not clear about what constitutes plagiarism.‘Plagiarism’ is 317 defined by the University to be “the representation of another’s works or ideas as one’s own; it includes the unacknowledged word for word use and/or paraphrase of another person’s work, and/or the inappropriate unacknowledged use of another person’s ideas”.There should be no misunderstanding about word for word transcriptions or simple paraphrases—these must be acknowledged through proper citations.It is sometimes not clear, though, when simply using the ideas of another requires citation.

This is especially true in the context of a course, in which one is, presumably acquiring fundamental ideas of a subject matter from the text or the instructor.Certain ideas are “in the public domain,” so to speak; they are ideas used by everyone working in the field, and do not require citation.Other ideas are such that their origin needs to be acknowledged.It is sometimes difficult for beginning students to distinguish these.It is helpful to remember that what is at issue is whether the failure to acknowledge a source would tend to misrepresent the idea as your own.

The failure to acknowledge your source for a distinction between civil disobedience and rebellion, for example, would not tend to misrepresent the distinction as your own since it is a distinction that anyone working in the field will draw in some way or other.To offer a specific account of this distinction that is offered by another without citing the source could easily tend to misrepresent the account as your own.It is clearly better to err on the side of over-acknowledgment in cases in which one is in doubt.I view academic misconduct of any sort as a very serious violation of University requirements.University rules provide for extremely serious sanctions for academic misconduct, and I will, as I am required to do, forward any cases of suspected misconduct to the Committee on Academic Misconduct.

Disability Services: Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office of Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated.They should inform me as soon as possible of their needs.The Office of Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; / PHILOSOPHY 338 PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS IN THE LAW Instructor: Don Hubin 337N University Hall email: email protected web page: /hubin1/ and 318 phone: 292-2505 Mondays 10:30 – 11:30, Tuesdays 3:30 – 4:30, and by appointment Texts: Philosophical Problems in the Law (Fourth Edition), edited by David M.Adams, Wadsworth Publishing Company (abbreviated ‘PPL’ below).Course Outline and Readings: (Please note that I do not include reading assignment dates on the syllabus.

That is to allow our pace to be determined by class needs.I give reading assignments dates in class.In the unlikely event that you miss a class, please check the web site for current readings.) The Nature of Law and Legal Reasoning Introduction: “The Problem of the Grudge Informers” Readings: PPL 159-163, PPL 1-14 What is Law? Readings: PPL 16-40 Classical Theories of Law Readings: PPL 40-49 Classical Natural Law Theory Readings: PPL 76-78 Classical Legal Positivism Readings: PPL 49-54 Modern Legal Positivism Readings: PPL 54-70 Modern Natural Law Theory Readings: PPL 70-76, 78-83 Modern Theories of Law Legal Realism Readings: PPL 83-99 Natural Law Revisited Readings: PPL 111-120 Legal Reasoning and the Constitution Readings: PPL 164-193 Individual Liberty and the Limits of Legal Coercion Legal Moralism: Readings: PPL 193-229 Pornography & Obscenity Readings: PPL 230-253 Equal Protection Equality, Parenthood, and Family Law Readings: PPL 346-367, 378-381 These topics are subject to change based on the interests of the class.Near the end of the first part of the class, I’ll survey the class to see what topics are of most interest.

Course Requirements: There will be one midterm exam and a final exam.The midterm will be after Part I of the course outline and will constitute 35% of your course grade.(The date of the midterm will be 319 announced in class at least one week in advance.) The final exam, which will be on the day and time set by the University (Wednesday, Dec 7, 1:30 - 3:18 p.), will be comprehensive but will emphasize material since the midterm.It will also constitute 35% of your course grade.The remaining 30% of your grade will be based on a short (4-6 page) paper.Exemplary class participation will be considered and may raise your grade in borderline cases.The paper is to be a critical analysis of one or more of the arguments presented in the class or readings.

Suggestions for paper topics will be handed out early in the course.You are not only invited, but encouraged, to select a paper topic not on the list of suggestions, but this should be done in consultation with me to ensure that the topic and approach is appropriate for the course.Papers will be due Academic Misconduct The University understands academic misconduct to include “any activity which tends to compromise the academic integrity of the institution, subvert the educational process” (“Procedures of the Committee on Academic Misconduct”, Sept.With respect to this course, examples include, but are not limited to, such actions as cheating on exams and submitting a term paper written by another.

No one should be unclear about whether these are wrong, but students are sometimes not clear about what constitutes plagiarism.‘Plagiarism’ is defined by the University to be “the representation of another’s works or ideas as one’s own; it includes the unacknowledged word for word use and/or paraphrase of another person’s work, and/or the inappropriate unacknowledged use of another person’s ideas”.There should be no misunderstanding about word for word transcriptions or simple paraphrases—these must be acknowledged through proper citations.It is sometimes not clear, though, when simply using the ideas of another requires citation.This is especially true in the context of a course, in which one is, presumably acquiring fundamental ideas of a subject matter from the text or the instructor.

Certain ideas are “in the public domain”, so to speak; they are ideas used by everyone working in the field, and do not require citation.Other ideas are such that their origin needs to be acknowledged.It is sometimes difficult for beginning students to distinguish these.It is helpful to remember that what is at issue is whether the failure to acknowledge a source would tend to misrepresent the idea as your own.The failure to acknowledge your source for a distinction between recklessness and negligence, for example, would not tend to misrepresent the distinction as your own since it is a distinction that anyone working in the field will draw in some way or other.

To offer a specific account of this distinction that is offered by another without citing the source could easily tend to misrepresent the account as your own.It is clearly better to err on the side of overacknowledgment in cases in which one is in doubt.I view academic misconduct of any sort as a very serious violation of University requirements.University rules provide for extremely serious sanctions for academic misconduct, and I will, as I am required to do, forward any cases of suspected misconduct to the Committee on Academic Misconduct.Disability Services: Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office of Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated.

They should inform me as soon as possible of their needs.The Office of Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; / 320 PHILOSOPHY 431 ETHICAL THEORY Instructor: Donald Hubin Reader: email protected /hubin1/ 350 University Hall 292-2510 Tuesday 3:00 – 4:00, Friday 10:00 – 11:00, and by appointment Conrad Robinson email protected 214 University Hall 292-3663 Wednesday 12:00 – 1:00, Thursday 2:00 – 3:00, and by appointment Course Objectives: This course is intended to be a rigorous introduction to normative ethics; it is designed to acquaint students who have a serious interest in philosophy with the major issues in ethical theory and the various approaches to these issues.We will examine the nature and basis moral value and obligation.Our discussion of issues in normative ethics will follow the presentation of Shelly Kagan in our primary text.However, the text will be augmented with additional readings, mostly from historical figures, assigned throughout the quarter.

Texts: Normative Ethics, Shelly Kagan Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals, Immanuel Kant (This is in the public domain and is available on line.See Carmen for a link to an electronic version.) The Classical Utilitarians, edited by John Troyer (The required readings in this anthology are all in the public domain and available on line.See Carmen for a link to electronic versions.) (Other readings as assigned in class or available on reserve) Proposed Topic Outline and Readings: NOTE: Selections from the works by Kant, Bentham and Mill will be interspersed with the readings in Kagan’s book (as will some other assigned reading).

By the end of the quarter, we will have read both of these books in their entirety.I recommend that you read them through completely as soon as possible and then work through the selections as they are assigned in class.Prior to the final exam, it would be good to read them straight through again.More detailed reading assignments and the due dates for the readings will be posted on Carmen throughout the 321 Introduction Readings: Kagan, pp.70-105 Other Constraints Readings: Kagan, pp.106-152 Further Factors Readings: Kagan, pp.153-188 Teleological Foundations Readings: Kagan, pp.189-239 Deontological Foundations Readings: Kagan, pp.

240-304 Course Requirements: There will be both a midterm examination and a final examination—each constituting 30% of your grade.The date of the midterm will be announced in class repeatedly at least one week before the midterm.The final exam, which (though comprehensive) will focus primarily on the material since the midterm, will be in the regular classroom on the date and time scheduled by the University: Wednesday, March 6, 11:30 am—1:18 pm.An additional 30% of your grade will be determined by a term paper (to be approximately 10-12 pages long).A rough draft of the paper is due Tuesday, February 19.

This draft will be returned with comments, criticisms and suggestions for revision.Though this draft will not be graded, a penalty of one full grade point will be assessed on the final draft if no rough draft was submitted.The final draft of your paper is due on the last day of class, Thursday, March 6.Both rough drafts and final drafts must be submitted through .Instructions for submitting papers will be available on the Carmen web site.

The balance (10%) of your grade will be determined by class participation and by your successful completion of reading summaries for the materials we read in class Assignment Midterm Term Paper (Rough Draft) Term Paper (Final Draft) Final Exam Date To Be Announced Tuesday, February 19 Thursday, March 6 Wednesday, March 12, 11:30 am—1:18 am As Assigned (most class meetings) Class Participation and Reading 322 Weight 30% (See above) 30% 30% 10% Summaries Academic Misconduct: The University understands academic misconduct to include “any activity which tends to compromise the academic integrity of the institution, subvert the educational process” (“Committee on Academic Misconduct Procedures and Rules”, 7/15/2004 < /coam/ >).With respect to this course, examples include, but are not limited to, such actions as cheating on exams and submitting a term paper written by another.No one should be unclear about whether these are wrong, but students are sometimes not clear about what constitutes plagiarism.‘Plagiarism’ is defined by the University to be “the representation of another’s works or ideas as one’s own; it includes the unacknowledged word for word use and/or paraphrase of another person’s work, and/or the inappropriate unacknowledged use of another person’s ideas”.

There should be no misunderstanding about word for word transcriptions or simple paraphrases—these must be acknowledged through proper citations.

It is sometimes not clear, though, when simply using the ideas of another requires citation.This is especially true in the context of a course, in which one is, presumably acquiring fundamental ideas of a subject matter from the text or the instructor.Certain ideas are “in the public domain”, so to speak; they are ideas used by everyone working in the field, and do not require citation.Other ideas are such that their origin needs to be acknowledged.It is sometimes difficult for students to distinguish these.

It is helpful to remember that what is at issue is whether the failure to acknowledge a source would tend to misrepresent the idea as your own.The failure to acknowledge your source for a distinction between duty and supererogation, for example, would not tend to misrepresent the distinction as your own since it is a distinction that anyone working in the field will draw in some way or other.To offer a specific account of this distinction that is offered by another without citing the source could easily tend to misrepresent the account as your own.It is clearly better to err on the side of over-acknowledgment in cases in which one is in doubt.I view academic misconduct of any sort as a very serious violation of University requirements.

University rules provide for extremely serious sanctions for academic misconduct, and I will, as I am required to do, forward any cases of suspected misconduct to the Committee on Academic Misconduct.Disability Services: Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office of Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated.They should inform me as soon as possible of their needs.The Office of Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; / PHILOSOPHY 533 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS Instructor : Address: Hours: E-mail: Don Hubin 337N University Hall M & Tu 2:30 – 3:30 and by appointment email protected 323 WWW: /people/donh/ Phone: 292-2505 (Office) and 292-7914 (Department Office) Course Description: This course is intended to be an introductory survey of environmental ethics.The course presupposes some familiarity with philosophical ethics.

(Those with no background in philosophical ethics should see me for some suggested readings.) Because of the interdisciplinary nature of environmental ethics, though, I will attempt to make the material as accessible as possible to those with even a bare minimum of philosophical background.The course will presuppose a degree of academic maturity and seriousness of purpose appropriate to a 500-level course.As background, we will examine the cultural and religious foundations of our environmental situation and engage in a brief survey of normative ethics.Our discussions of environmental ethics itself will begin by examining the environmental implications of recognizing moral duties to other humans—first, our contemporaries, and, then, future generations.

Such duties provide a seemingly strong basis for moral criticism of many of our most controversial environmental practices.If we extend moral consideration to sentient, non-human animals, there are even broader— but still generally recognized—grounds for criticizing these practices.However, many environmentalists argue that these duties do not provide us with an adequate environmental “ethic”.To address these concerns, we will examine the proposition that non-sentient animals, plants and even eco-systems, themselves, are of intrinsic moral significance.Finally, we will examine economic mechanisms for evaluating the moral desirability of environmental policies and projects.

Texts: Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application, 2nd edition, ed.Pojman More readings may be added as the quarter progresses.Introduction: What is Ethics? Readings: pp.

Cultural and Religious Backgrounds Readings: pp.Ethics and Global Obligations Readings: pp.

Ethics and Future Generations Readings: pp.Ethics and Non-Human Animals Readings: pp.Ethics and the Scope of Intrinsic Moral Significance Readings: pp.Economics and the Environment Readings: pp.493 - 521 324 Course Requirements: Course requirements include midterm and final examinations, active and informed class participation, reading worksheets, a classroom presentation and a philosophical term paper (about 10 pages long).Each examination will constitute 25% of your grade, the combined weight of the worksheets and class participation will be 10%.

The classroom presentation will constitute 10% of your grade and remaining 30% will be determined by your term paper.Term papers will be submitted first in rough draft form.These drafts will not be graded, but they will be returned with comments and suggestions.Though no grade will be given on the term paper drafts, they are required; failure to submit a rough draft will result in reduction of the grade on the final draft of the paper of one full letter grade.

Academic Misconduct The University understands academic misconduct to include "any activity which tends to compromise the academic integrity of the institution, subvert the educational process" ("Procedures of the Committee on Academic Misconduct", Sept.

With respect to this course, examples include, but are not limited to, such actions as cheating on exams and submitting a term paper written by another.No one should be unclear about these cases.Students sometimes are not clear about what constitutes plagiarism.'Plagiarism' is defined by the University to be "the representation of another's works or ideas as one's own; it includes the unacknowledged word for word use and/or paraphrase of another person's work, and/or the inappropriate unacknowledged use of another person's ideas".

While there should be no misunderstanding about the word for word transcriptions or simple paraphrases—these must be acknowledged through proper citations—some are unclear about the use of another person's ideas—especially in the context of a course, in which one is, presumably learning acquiring fundamental ideas of a subject matter from the text or the instructor.Certain ideas are "in the public domain", so to speak; they are ideas that everyone working in the field use in approaching the subject matter, and do not require citation.Other ideas are such that their origin needs to be acknowledged.It is sometimes difficult for beginning students to distinguish these.It is helpful to remember that what is at issue is whether the failure to acknowledge a source would tend to misrepresent the idea as your own.

The failure to acknowledge your source for a distinction between instrumental value and intrinsic value, for example, would not tend to misrepresent the distinction as your own since it is a distinction that anyone working in the field will draw in some way or other.To offer a specific account of this distinction that is offered by another without citing the source could easily tend to misrepresent the account as your own.It is clearly better to err on the side of over-acknowledgment in cases in which one is in doubt.I view academic misconduct of any sort, including the intentional misrepresentation of the ideas of others as being your own, as a very serious violation of University requirements.University rules provide for extremely serious sanctions for academic misconduct, and I will forward any cases of suspected misconduct to the Committee on Academic Misco 325 Political Science 210 Introduction to Political Theory Winter 2009 Professor Amadae TR1:30-3:18, AP 0383 email: email protected Off.

Oval Mall This course is an introduction to political theory and assumes no prior knowledge.

We will discuss six topic areas: democracy; justice; collective action; power and freedom; ethnicity, gender and identity; and sovereignty.We will adopt a “smorgasbord” approach, sampling from well-known theorists’ work addressing issues of contemporary concern.For example, we will discuss how the 9/11 attack affects our thinking about national sovereignty.Students will develop analytic ability, reading facility, and communication proficiency.As well, they will have a foundation for taking further courses in the subfield of political theory.

Course requirements are reading the assigned texts, participating in class discussions and exercises, preparing for quizzes, and taking one mid-term and one final exam.You must complete the readings in a timely fashion and participate actively in class discussions.To encourage you to prepare well for class, we will have a series of short, unannounced quizzes based on course readings.Together, these quizzes count for 30% of your grade.

You will write an in-class mid-term exam, and an in-class final exam.Their weights will be 30% and 40%, respectively.Course Materials∗ ∗ Course readings for Political Science 210 are available online through Carmen.All of the work that you do in this course is expected to be your own.

Plagiarism (using someone else’s words or ideas without citing them) and other forms of cheating will be reported to the university committee on academic misconduct and handled according to university policy.∗ ∗ Students with disabilities are responsible for making their needs known to the instructor and seeking available assistance in the first week of the quarter.Course materials are available in alternative formats upon request.∗ Course Syllabus and Schedule of Class Meetings Introduction and Overview Tuesday, Jan.5 Introduction PART I: DEMOCRACY AND COLLECTIVE ACTION Thursday, Jan.Mill, “On the Subjugation of Women,” 261-271; “Of Liberty of Thought and Discussion,” On Liberty, 36-48.13 Robert Dahl, Democracy and Its Critics, Chapters 6-9.15 Jon Elster, “The Market and the Forum.

Page, “Diversity and Problem Solving,” The Difference, pp.22 326 Thomas Hobbes, selection from The Leviathan.

27 Garret Hardin, “The Tragedy of the Commons” and “Framework for Understanding International Collective Action for Climate Change.29 Robert Nozick, Anarchy, State and Utopia, pp.Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1999, selections.5 Midterm review MIDTERM EXAM, Parts I & II Tuesday, Feb.10 PART III: POWER AND FREEDOM Thursday, Feb.12 Jeremy Bentham, selection from A Fragment on Government.17 Karl Marx, selections from “Critique of Political Economy,” “Estranged Labor,” and “Communist Manifesto”.

19 Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish.PART IV: ETHNICITY, GENDER, AND IDENTITY Tuesday, Feb.24 Molefi Asante, “Racism, Conscience, and Afrocentricity,” Lure and Loathing: Essays on Race, Identity, and the Ambivalence of Assimilation.” In Look, A Negro: Philosophical Essays on Race, Culture, and Politics.

Tuesday, March 3 Carol Cohn, “Sex and Death in the Rational World of Defense Intellectuals,” Signs, 12:4 (Summer, 1987), 687-718.PART V: SOVEREINTY Thursday, March 5 J rgen Habermas.“Fundamentalism and Terror: A Dialogue with J rgen Habermas.” In Philosophy in a Time of Terror: Dialogues with J rgen Habermas and Jacques Derrida.

Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003, 25-41.“Autoimmunity: Real and Symbolic Suicides.” In Philosophy in a Time of Terror: Dialogues with J rgen Habermas and Jacques Derrida.

Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003.Thursday, March 12 327 Final Review FINAL: TIME AND LOCATION ACCORDING TO REGISTRAR The Ohio State University Department of Political Science Political Science 305: Introduction to the Public Policy Process Winter 2009 (Mondays and Wednesdays: 2:00-3:48 p., Page Hall 0010) Craig Volden Professor of Political Science Office Hours: Tues.

E-mail: email protected Phone: 614-292-9026 Office: 2147 Derby Hall Teaching Assistants: Josh Kertzer; email protected ; 2043 Derby Hall; Office Hours: Fridays 11:3012:30.Chaekwang You; email protected ; 2081 Derby Hall; Office Hours: Thurs.Course Description: Introduction to the Public Policy Process is a course designed for undergraduate students with an interest in political science, economics, or public policy, although students in a variety of fields may find the class interesting and useful and are thus encouraged to enroll.The course is also part of the College of Social and Behavioral Science’s new Minor in Public Policy (for more details, see: /ugrads/ppolicy/ ).The course has three main purposes: (1) to provide students with exposure to a number of lenses through which scholars and practitioners view the policymaking process, (2) to examine many of the steps in that process, and (3) to illustrate the public policy process in action through more than a dozen case studies.The course is structured to follow the assembly-line model of policymaking, with additional readings included to display various approaches to the study of public policy.The course is conducted on a lecture, discussion, and case analysis basis.

A typical class session will contain a lecture that addresses the theoretical aspects and conceptual tools raised in the session’s readings, a case presentation by a group of students, and then a guided discussion about how the case illustrates class concepts.Course materials: The course materials include two required and one recommended books available in the campus bookstore (Barnes & Noble/Long’s) or online, and overheads used in class discussions: 328 Required: Stella Z.Issues for Debate in American Public Policy, 9th Ed.Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision Making, Revised Edition.Class overhead notes, made available before class on Carmen ( ), should be downloaded, printed out, and brought to class.

Course requirements and grading: The course requirements are: mastery of the course content, as illustrated through constructive contributions to class discussions, a group presentation, two policy memos, a midterm exam, and a final exam.Grades will be assigned a weighted average of six components—class participation (10%), group presentations (15%), policy memos (10% each), the midterm exam (25%), and the final exam (30%).Students are expected to attend class, to have read the material, and to be prepared for occasional discussions in class.Several students will be called upon in each class session to contribute to class discussion, as the basis for their class participation grade.Students will be self-organized into groups to lead discussions of the cases for each class.

Group presentations are to be no shorter than 20 minutes and no longer than 30 minutes, followed by questions and a class discussion.Group presentations should include the following components: (a) summarize the case reading, (b) tie that material to the theoretical concepts explored earlier in the quarter, (c) raise a particular public policy problem based on the case reading, (d) present and advocate for a policy to address the problem (also raising alternative solutions), (e) discuss the arguments against the proposed policy change, (f) detail which policymakers support and which oppose the policy change and why, and (g) assess the likelihood of this policy change occurring, based on the politics of the public policy process as detailed in case materials, in outside research, and in class concepts from earlier in the quarter.It should be noted that these presentations are NOT intended to lead to policy debates.Students should be concerned less with persuading others of the benefits of their policy proposal than in using that proposal to help the class better understand the policy process.The format will be different for the groups in Session 7 and Session 17, during which we will have two groups taking opposing positions regarding the likelihood of policy change.

The format of those presentations will be discussed with the groups well in advance of their presentations.The presentation will be worth 15% of the students’ grade.Half of the group’s grade will be based on Prof.Volden’s evaluations of the group presentation.The other half will be 329 based on group members’ evaluations of one another’s contributions to the group (which should be emailed to Prof.

Volden following the group presentation).Overheads for group presentations should be emailed to Prof.Volden after the presentation to be posted on Carmen.All students (whether presenting or not) are, of course, expected to have read the material and to be prepared for discussion of the cases for each class.

Students will complete two individual policy memos advocating policy change in issues covered by the case study topics for particular classes.

One of these memos will deal with the issue about which the student is making a group presentation; the other will be chosen from the alphabetical list below.Students must write their two memos on two different topics, and so should not choose to do a group presentation in the same sessions when their other memo is due.330 Students with last names beginning with the following letters must write on one of these cases: A-D: Due January 28 on topics “Health Care” or “Oil Jitters” from Sessions 7 or 8.E-K: Due February 11 on topics “Torture” or “Domestic Poverty” from Sessions 11 or 12.Iran Policy” or “Infrastructure” from Sessions 13 or 14.S-Z: Due February 25 on topics “Gun Violence” or “Superbugs” from Sessions 15 or 16.Students must complete these memos by themselves, without the assistance of others.Any questions about the memos should be addressed directly to Prof.

Memos are due at the start of the class session on the indicated date.Volden ahead of the due dates with major problems, no late memos will be accepted.Students who do receive extensions will have their grade reduced, with the exception of those facing medical or other accepted emergencies.

Memo length is to be no shorter than 2 pages and no longer than 3 pages, single-spaced, 12-point font, one-inch margins, standard paper size.Each memo must be addressed to an actual policymaker who will be making a relevant decision over the issue in question.The memo should: (a) provide background on the issue, (b) lay out the options available to the policymaker and a description of why this policymaker has jurisdiction over this policy decision, (c) advocate a specific action, (d) address why your position should be supported by this policymaker (why is it in his or her self interest, for example?), (e) address counter-arguments and alternative positions that the policymaker will care about, and (f) be persuasive, clear, and factually correct.Obviously, policy memos in the realworld will not include academic citations; nevertheless, to avoid plagiarism concerns (see below), all referenced books, articles, websites, and ideas should be noted clearly in endnotes (which can appear on a fourth page, if necessary).Each memo will be equivalent to 10% of the student’s grade.

The midterm exam will be held in the course classroom at the scheduled course time on Feb.The exam will contain true/false, short answer, and essay questions.The exam will be closed-notes and closed-book.The midterm exam will comprise 25% of each student’s grade.

The final exam will be held in the course classroom at 1:30-3:18 on the WEDNESDAY of exam week (March 18).The exam will cover material from throughout the quarter, and will be composed of true/false, short answer, and essay questions.The exam will be closed-notes and closed-book.The final exam will comprise 30% of each student’s grade.Academic Honesty: Dishonest practices on the examinations, on memos, or in the course generally are unacceptable.

There will be no 331 collaboration beyond the group projects.Absolutely no cheating or plagiarism (using someone else’s words or ideas without proper citation) will be tolerated.Any cases of cheating or plagiarism will be reported to the university committee on academic misconduct, and they will be handled according to university policy.Specifically: It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.

The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( /resource ).Disability: Students in need of an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact Prof.Volden to arrange an appointment as soon as possible, to discuss the course format, anticipate student needs, and explore potential accommodations.

Disabled students who have not previously contacted the Office for Disability Services are encouraged to do so.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; /.Course Outline: Session 1: Monday, January 5—Introduction to the Public Policy Process This introductory session will be used to introduce students to one another and to the course.We will go over the syllabus, discuss why we are interested in public policy, and describe various ways to study the public policy process.Session 2: Wednesday, January 7—Studying the Public Policy Process This session allows students to view the steps of the public policy process.

From the formation of ideas to the mobilization of individuals in support of action through the political decisions to implementation and evaluation, the public policy process takes various forms and involves complex decisions and analysis.Students are here exposed to different frameworks through which they can view the policy process.The scholars and practitioners we focus on provide a broad range of insights and overviews of public policy.The Contemporary Language of Public Policy: A Starting Point.Distribution, Regulation, Redistribution: The Functions of Government.Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.333 Session 3: Monday, January 12—Stage I: Problem Recognition and Issue Identification This session addresses the first stage of the public policy process, that of problem recognition and issue identification.Where do ideas come from, and what is the role of the public in the process? Are good ideas among the public raised by policymakers? Can policymakers remain isolated from public responsiveness? Is broad consensus behind an idea needed for it to successfully navigate its way through the public policy process? In this session we confront our assumptions about where public policies come from.Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.

Chapter 1, The Market and the Polis, pp.Session 4: Wednesday, January 14—Controversy 1: Is the Public Policy Process Sufficiently Responsive to the Public? In this session we explore the responsiveness of the public policy process to the public.Do public preferences translate smoothly into public policy outcomes, or are there pervasive biases in the policy process resulting in policies that are nonresponsive to the will of the people? We thus continue our discussion from the previous class, with a specific focus on those who are economically more or less advantaged.

To what extent do the elite make policies that are harmful to the masses? We explore these issues within the context of the recent and ongoing mortgage crisis.Volden offers a model of a case presentation that groups can follow throughout the quarter.Case: Mortgage Crisis, Chapter 12 in Issues for Debate.

An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution.Who Rules America Now? Chapter 46 in T&C, pp.Session 5: Monday, January 19—No Class—Martin Luther King Day 334 335 Session 6: Wednesday, January 21—Stage II: Agenda Setting Public policies begin as ideas that eventually work their ways onto political agendas.

Where do these ideas come from and how do they enter the political arena? Today we confront different views of agenda setting and discuss how these views help us understand the initial steps in the public policy process.Case: Immigration Debate, Chapter 14 in Issues for Debate.Group Politics and Representative Democracy.

Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.

Session 7: Monday, January 26—Stage II: Agenda Setting (cont.) Building on the ideas advanced last week, we examine Kingdon’s model of agenda setting.

To add substantive context to this model, we explore the recurrence of universal health care on the political agenda, and its prospects for successfully navigating the public policy process in the near future.Case: Health Care: Universal Coverage, Chapter 3 in Issues for Debate.(Note: Two groups will present today, one arguing that the U.government will significantly overhaul our health care system during President Obama’s first term, the other arguing that an overhaul will not occur in this time frame.

Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.Session 8: Wednesday, January 28—Controversy 2: Is the Public Suitably Informed and Do Policymakers Adequately Weigh Public Opinion? Once an idea is advanced in a democracy, it may gain momentum or be thwarted based on the reactions of the public.

Proposals that are not supported by the public are far more difficult to pass through political processes, especially when politicians are focused on reelection.Yet, public opinion is not always easy to 336 understand.The public may be uninformed about important issues, and media involvement may affect what is learned about policies over time.The public may be persuaded by the ways in which arguments are advanced, or members of the public may turn a deaf ear to information that would lead them to a conclusion other than the one they already support.

Case: Oil Jitters, Chapter 7 in Issues for Debate.

The Players: Institutional and Noninstitutional Actors in the Policy Process.Processing the News: How People Tame the Information Tide.Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.***Memo due today for students with last names starting with letters A-D.

*** Session 9: Monday, February 2—Stage III: Policy Formulation While the public may have strong views about an issue, little will be accomplished without collective and active pressure on politicians to adopt policy changes.Moreover, policies may sound more attractive in the abstract than when given deep consideration of their consequences.This session raises these issues as we enter a discussion of the heart of the public policy process: policy formulation.Debates over the politics and policy choices surrounding student aid add context to our discussion.Case: Student Aid, Chapter 2 in Issues for Debate.

Readings: Iyengar, Shanto, and Donald Kinder.Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.Session 10: Wednesday, February 4—Midterm Exam Students will take the closed book, closed notes exam in class today.

The exam is made up of true/false, short answer, and short essay questions, and is worth 25% of the student’s grade.337 338 Session 11: Monday, February 9—Controversy 3: Are Public Policy Decisions Made Based on Symbolism or Substance? Often symbolic politics trumps the substance of important policy proposals.How are such symbols constructed and utilized? To what extent are beneficial policies brushed aside as too difficult to explain or to sell to the public? This class session explores how policymakers frame public policy ideas and the facts upon which those ideas are based.These issues will be raised again and again throughout the quarter.Case: Torture Debate, Chapter 10 in Issues for Debate.

Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.Session 12: Wednesday, February 11—Stage IV: Policy Adoption Public preferences are translated into policy through political institutions.

In today’s class we begin to explore the workings of two of the main national policymaking institutions – Congress and the presidency.What role does each play in the formation and then the adoption of policies? Is a healthy balance of powers struck between these two branches of government? Or does this balance lead to gridlock and a failure to adopt valuable policy proposals? Case: Domestic Poverty, Chapter 5 in Issues for Debate.Congress: Keystone of the Washington Establishment.

Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.***Memo due today for students with last names starting with letters E-K.*** 339 340 Session 13: Monday, February 16—Stage IV: Policy Adoption (cont.) In this session we continue our discussion from the previous class, with the case study of U.

foreign policy toward Iran adding useful additional context.What have been the roles of Congress and the President in formulating foreign policy? Given the difficulties resolving serious issues of foreign policy, does Congress willfully abdicate its responsibility to critically examine the policy choices of the President? Case: U.Policy on Iran, Chapter 15 in Issues for Debate.

Presidential Power: The Politics of Leadership from FDR to Carter.Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.Session 14: Wednesday, February 18—Controversy 4: Do Policy Changes Tend to Be Incremental or Dramatic, and Why? In this session and the next we continue our in-depth study of the political institutions that make crucial policy-formation and adoption decisions.

In a system of checks and balances, policymaking may be very incremental in nature, or it make take sudden turns.Given uncertainty and technological change, policymakers may be too slow to act or may act with excessive haste.When does each occur? Case: Aging Infrastructure, Chapter 13 in Issues for Debate.Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.***Memo due today for students with last names starting with letters L-R.*** 341 Session 15: Monday, February 23— Controversy 4: Do Policy Changes Tend to Be Incremental or Dramatic, and Why? (cont.) Here we continue to understand the connections between politics and policy.

The incremental decision making of last class is set in contrast with dramatic policymaking of the punctuated equilibrium discussed today.What policies follow which model over time? What political circumstances might affect whether we see incremental or dramatic policy change? What “Change” should we expect early in the Obama administration? Case: Gun Violence, Chapter 6 in Issues for Debate.Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.Session 16: Wednesday, February 25—Stage V: Policy Implementation Once formulated, public policies are often interpreted, modified, and administered by public agencies.Politicians cannot usually specify in as great detail as they would like all of the specific conditions of their policy proposals.As such, they make broad legislative advancements, relying on bureaucrats to carry out the politicians’ desires.However, the workings of complex organizations, and the possibility that bureaucrats have different goals than do politicians, lead to the conclusion that policy outcomes derived through bureaucratic involvement often differ from those desired in the idea-formation stage.

As such, the study of bureaucracy is crucial in developing an understanding of the public policy process.Case: Fighting Superbugs, Chapter 4 in Issues for Debate.Issue Networks and the Executive Establishment.

Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.***Memo due today for students with last names starting with letters S-Z.*** 342 Session 17: Monday, March 2— Stage V: Policy Implementation (cont.) Building on our understanding of the bureaucracy from last session, in this class we focus further on policy implementation.After policies are specified through the public policy process, they still must be carried out.

And often the most difficult decisions are confronted when policies on paper meet facts on the ground.This week we explore the implementation stage of the policy process in more detail, examining how implementation decisions may ultimately differ from the desires of policymakers with earlier roles in the process.Case: Cost of the Iraq War, Chapter 16 in Issues for Debate.(Note: Two groups will present today, one arguing that the U.

government will not play a significant military role in Iraq by the end of President Obama’s first term, the other arguing that we will still have such a role at the end of 2012.Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.Session 18: Wednesday, March 4—Controversy 5: What Causes Policies to Fail? Throughout the quarter, we have attempted to understand the politics behind the public policy process.Such politics may be the basis for some policies not performing as well as we would wish.Still other policies fail because of the complexity of the policy problem.And still other policies deemed failures by some are considered successful to others.Today we confront the normative arguments behind the success and failure of public policies.

Case: Hate Speech, Chapter 11 in Issues for Debate.Readings: Majone, Giandomenico, and Aaron Wildavsky.A Conceptual Framework of the Implementation Process.

Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.343 Session 19: Monday, March 9—Stage VI: Policy Analysis and Evaluation We conclude our discussions of the consequences of policy implementation decisions in this session, with a brief discussion of policy analysis and evaluation.These issues are illustrated in today’s case, which explores the federal government’s involvement in education through the No Child Left Behind Act.Case: No Child Left Behind, Chapter 1 in Issues for Debate.Towards an Imperial Judiciary? Chapter 31 in T&C, pp.The Role of Evaluation in Public Policy.Optional Recommended Readings: Stone, Deborah.Session 20: Wednesday, March 11—Wrap Up and Review for Final Exam Today we review the major themes from throughout the quarter.

Volden will address student questions in advance of next week’s final exam.***Final Exam: WEDNESDAY, March 18, Page Hall 0010, 1:30-3:18 p.*** Political Science 541: The Politics of the Developing World Prof.Marcus Kurtz 2049D Derby Hall 292-0952 Winter 2009 email protected Teaching Assistant: Didi Lund Office Hours: MW 2:30-3:30, and by appointment.

Course Website: Description The premise of this course is that economic development is as much a political question as it is an economic one.The goal will be to understand the different approaches that poorer countries have taken to the question of development, why they have made differing choices, and their political and economic consequences.Along the way we will consider questions that touch on contemporary political debates: What are the merits or dangers of international economic integration (free trade)? What is the proper role of the state in the process of economic development? What is the relationship (positive or negative) among free markets, democratic politics, political corruption, and human/labor rights? What can be learned from recent “successful” cases of development, and are these lessons useful in a world that is increasingly globalized? What political dynamics can cause – or cure – financial crises? The course is structured around two broadly defined and fundamentally different (or at east so I will argue) periods—the long postwar 344 boom from 1945 to the debt crisis of the 1980s, and the more challenging period of globalization thereafter.This is a course in comparative political economy, not in economics, and it does not require any economics knowledge as a prerequisite.The only prerequisite is an open, critical mind.

Course Requirements This course has three requirements that will enter into the calculation of your grade: two short midterms and final exam.All exams are cumulative, but weighted toward material not already covered.Note that the exams will generally be in essay format, and will require you to take and defend positions on issues related to the course.There will likely also be some short answer questions on the midterms.You are not graded on the particular position you take, but rather on the quality of your defense of that perspective.

That is to say that the effective linkage of evidence to argument is the standard of evaluation.Grades will be calculated according to the following weights: Short Midterm I 30% Short Midterm II 30% Final Exam 40% There is a TA for this course who will be responsible for the grading of the essay and the exams.All grade appeals will be handled by the professor.There are no recitation sections, though the TA will be available for an office hour after each exam to answer questions about the grading.Website and Email The URL for the course website is listed above.

Important information and some handouts will be made available there.Most notably, study guides and in-class handouts will usually be accessible there after they have been distributed in class (how soon may vary).If you missed a handout, you should be able to obtain it from the website.You will need Adobe Acrobat (it’s free) to access most files.In addition, course information and updates will regularly be sent out via email.

It is important (and required) that you check your OSU email and the course website regularly.The good news is that there is only one (inexpensive) book for this course (saving you some serious money!).The other good news is that all the other readings for this course will posted on the Carmen website – that is, there will be no expensive coursepack to purchase.pdf form, so be sure that the computer you use has the Adobe Acrobat reader (available for free at ).Some of the readings are long – you will probably want to download and print them through a high-speed connection; you’ll wait a long time with a dialup link (if anyone still uses those…).Development as Freedom (New York: Anchor Books).

A Warning: The readings for this class are sometimes VERY DIFFICULT.The idea is to present you material taken directly from the books and journals that political scientists read, rather than in some predigested textbook form.You will not necessarily always understand 100 percent of what is in the articles (or if you do, then you’re doing very well indeed!), and that is intentional.The idea is to stretch your abilities as far as possible and the only way to do that is to set the bar as high as possible.

Rest assured that you will be tested on material that is extensively discussed and interpreted in class; there will be no effort to include trick questions about obscure and difficult bits of the reading.Grading is not punitive, nor is it curved.Academic Honesty Do not cheat and do not plagiarize.Academic dishonesty has become quite easy to catch, and you should avoid it at all costs.Infractions will be punished as provided for under university policy.

If you are unsure as to what constitutes a violation, please do not hesitate to inquire.Details of the university academic honesty policy, and the complete code of student conduct, are available on the OSU website: /resource .Special Needs Every effort will be made to accommodate students who have special needs.These will be handled according to university policy.

Please bring these to the attention of your TA and your Professor in the first week or two of class so that proper arrangements can be made.

Missed Exams/Emergencies 345 From time to time emergencies occur that prevent you from taking exams at the regularly scheduled time and place (e., severe injury, death in the immediate family).Accommodations are possible, but only with advance notice and only if the reason represents a circumstance that could neither be anticipated nor is under the control of the student.Potential problems should be brought to the attention of the professor and the TA as soon as you know about them (and in advance of the exam in question).

Obviously, prior notification is not required in the case of emergency medical conditions that occur immediately prior to the exam, though documentation may be required after the fact.Do not hesitate to email or call your professor (see first page for number) if you have a special circumstance that makes it impossible for you to take an exam at the normal time or place.This paragraph does not apply to students who are eligible for alternative procedures by the Office of Disability Services.These will happily be accommodated in the usual fashion.No Recording or Transmission of Course Material No form of recording – electronic, audio, video, or other – is permitted in class except for the taking of class notes (without explicit permission of the instructor).

Your class notes, to the extent to which they are transcriptions of the class, are for your own individual use, though they may be shared with other students 3 in the class.As they are intellectual property, however, they may not be sold, posted on the web, or given to individuals who are not registered for the course.January 7: The Challenge of Postwar Development—“Development” and “Underdevelopment” Spero, Joan E.

“The North-South System and Possibility of Change.” The Politics of International Economic Relations (NY: St.The Stages of Economic Growth: A Non-Communist Manifesto (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1962), pp.

“Commercial Policy in the Underdeveloped Countries.” American Economic Review 49 (May, 1959), pp.Stephen Haggard, Pathways from the Periphery (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1990), pp.January 12 and 14: Development Miracles in Korea and Taiwan Atul Kholi.“Where Do High-Growth Political Economies Come From? The Japanese Lineage of Korea’s ‘Developmental State’ ” in Meredith Woo Cumings, The Developmental State (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press).“Political Institutions and Economic Performance: The Government-Business Relationship in Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan” in Fredric Deyo, ed.The Political Economy of the New Asian Industrialism (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1987), pp.“The Origin and Development of the Northeast Asian Political Economy” in Fredric Deyo, ed.The Political Economy of the New Asian Industrialism (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1987), pp.January 21 and 26: Authoritarianism and Industrialization in Latin America: Mexico and Brazil Skidmore, Thomas and Peter Smith.(Oxford: Oxford University Press): Import Substitution and its stagnation, pp.

Paulo Rabello de Castro and Marcio Ronci.“Sixty Years of Populism in Brazil” in Rudiger Dornbusch and Sebastian Edwards, eds., The Macroeconomics of Populism (Chicago: University of Chicago Press).“The Desarrollista State in Brazil and Mexico” in Meredith Woo Cumings, The Developmental State (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press).“The Collapse of Democracy in Brazil: Its Economic Determinants” Latin American Research Review XV:3 (1980), pp.February 2: Development “Failure” in Democratic Ireland and India, and Authoritarian East Africa Denis O’Hearn.“The Irish Case of Dependency: An Exception to the Exceptions?” American Sociological Review.

Markets and States in Tropical Africa: The Political Basis of Agricultural 346 Policies.Berkeley: University of California Press, pp.“The Market for Public Office: Why the Indian State is not Better at Development” World Development Vol.February 4: The collapse of the postwar model, and the return of the ‘free market’ Esmail Hosseinzadeh.

“Global Debt: Causes and Cures” Review of Radical Political Economy Vol.Crisis and Reform in Latin America: From Despair to Hope (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), pp.February 9 and 11: The Diagnosis, Critique, and New Issues—What should we do now? Advocates of a Free Market Response: John Williamson, “In Search of a Manual for Technopols” in John Williamson, ed., The Political Economy of Policy Reform (Washington, DC: Institute for International Economics, 1994), pp.

Critics of the Free Market Approach Joseph Stiglitz and Lyn Squire, “International Development: Is It Possible?” in Jeffry Frieden and David Lake, eds., International Political Economy (New York: St.383-391 Robin Broad, John Cavanagh, and Walden Bello.

“Development: The Market Is Not Enough” in Frieden and Lake, eds.“The Rise and Fall of the Washington Consensus as a Paradigm for Developing Countries” World Development Vol.28:5 Empirical Evidence on the effects of stabilization Pastor, Manuel and Carol Wise.“Stabilization and Its Discontents: Argentina’s Economic Restructuring in the 1990s” World Development Vol.“Blaming the Victim in Argentina” and “Is Argentina the Coup de Grace of the IMF’s Flawed Policy Mission?” Foreign Policy in Focus.“Peruvian Economic Policy in the 1980s: From Orthodoxy to Heterodoxy and Back” Latin American Research Review Vol.February 16: Free Trade Free Trade Debates Rodrik, Dani.“The Limits of Trade Policy Reform in Developing Countries” Journal of Economic Perspectives Vol.“Openness, Trade Liberalization, and Growth in Developing Countries” Journal of Economic Literature 31:3 (September).“Managing Trade: South Korea and Taiwan as Challenges for Economics and Political Science” Comparative Politics Vol.

February 23: Free Movement of Money Capital Markets: Financial Crisis or International Development? Robert Wade.Wheels within Wheels: Rethinking the Asian Crisis and the Asian Model” Annual Review of Political Science Vol.

“The Capital Myth: The Difference between Trade in Widgets and Dollars” Foreign Affairs Vol.Globalization and Its Discontents Chapter 4: The East Asia Crisis: How IMF Policies Brought the World to the Verge of a Global Meltdown” (New York: Norton).February 25: Free Markets and Labor in the Developing World Bhagwati, Jagdish.

“Trade Liberalisation and 'Fair Trade' Demands: Addressing the Environmental and Labour Standards Issues” The World Economy Vol.“Are Your Wages Set in Beijing?” in Jeffry Frieden and David Lake, eds., International Political Economy (New York: St.“The Economics of the Sweatshop” in Andrew Ross, ed.“From War Zone to Free Trade Zone” in Andrew Ross, ed.March 2: What about other human needs? Amartya Sen.Chapters 6-7, “Democracy” and “Famine” pp.March 4: Is the state going away or coming back in a different form? Ireland Riain, Se n.

“The Flexible Developmental State: Globalization, Information Technology, and the “Celtic Tiger” Politics & Society Vol.“Globalization, “New Tigers,” and the End of the Developmental State? The Case of the Celtic Tiger” Politics & Society Vol.Latin America Andrew Schrank and Marcus Kurtz.“Credit Where Credit is Due: Open Economy Industrial Policy and Export Diversification in Latin America and the Caribbean” Politics & Society Vol.

33:4 (December) Marcus Kurtz and Sarah Brooks.“Embedding Neoliberal Reform in Latin America” World Politics Vol.March 9: What Else Are We Missing? Sen, Amartya.Development as Freedom (New York: Anchor Books), Chs.“Freedom and the Foundation of Justice,” “Poverty as Capability Deprivation,” and “Markets, State, and Social Opportunity,” pp.

March 11: In-Class Review Session for Final Exam Political Science 551 The United Nations System Monday and Wednesday, 1:30 – 3:18 Professor: Alexander Thompson Teaching Assistant: Jason Keiber Department of Political Science Derby Hall 2012 2139 Derby Hall email protected email protected Office Hours: Tues.3:30-5:00 (or by appointment) Course Description This course begins with an overview of various theoretical perspectives on international relations generally and on the role of international organizations and law more specifically.

We then examine the historical evolution of the United Nations and its precursors, and discuss the UN’s structure and governance role in various areas, including international peace and security, human rights, development, and the environment.We also assess the weaknesses and strengths of the UN and its agencies and possibilities for reform.We then turn to the topic of globalization and the role of the UN, WTO and other international organizations.We conclude with a discussion of unilateralism versus multilateralism as alternative political strategies in the contemporary international system.348 Course Requirements Students are expected to attend every class session and to keep themselves updated on current events involving the UN and other international organizations (we will begin every Wednesday session with a discussion of relevant current events).

Graded assignments include: two quizzes, a midterm exam, a final exam, and a 5-page paper on UN reform (due March 4).Detailed instructions on the paper assignment will be forthcoming in class.The quizzes and exams will test course readings as well as information covered during class sessions.Note that class lectures and discussion will often cover material that is not covered in the course texts, so receiving a good grade in this course requires that you attend class and do the readings.

The final grade will be determined as follows: Midterm exam 30% Final exam 30% Paper 20% Quiz 1 10% Quiz 2 10% Course Texts The following required books are available at SBX: • Karen Mingst & Margaret Karns, The United Nations in the 21st Century, 3rd Ed.

, The Politics of Global Governance, 3rd Ed.PS 551 syllabus 2 Academic Misconduct It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).

For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( /resource ).Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as 349 soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; /.PS 551 syllabus 3 COURSE OUTLINE AND READINGS January 5 – Introductory session Readings: Mingst & Karns, Chapter 1 January 7 – International Organizations: Trends and Concepts Readings: -Pevehouse, Nordstrom & Warnke, in Diehl -Abbott & Snidal, in Diehl January 12 – The Evolution of the United Nations Readings: -Thompson & Snidal, “International Organization,” pp.692-98 (Carmen; or at / ) -Mingst & Karns, Chapter 2, pp.

17-22 January 14 – The Structure of the United Nations Readings: Mingst & Karns, Chapter 2, pp.22-52 January 19 – No class; Martin Luther King, Jr., Day January 21 – Actors and Decision-making in the UN System Quiz #1 Readings: Mingst & Karns, Chapter 3 January 26 – Actors and Decision-making in the UN System (cont.) Readings: Johnstone, in Diehl January 28 – Peace and Security: Collective Security Readings: -Mingst & Karns, Chapter 4 -Miller, in Diehl February 2 – Peace and Security: Peacekeeping Readings: Diehl, in Diehl February 4 – Case Study: The Iraq Wars Readings: Fareed Zakaria, “We Had Good Intel—The UN’s,” Newsweek, February 9, 2004 (Carmen; or through OSCAR) February 9 – Midterm Exam PS 551 syllabus 4 February 11 – Human Rights Readings: -Mingst & Karns, Chapter 6 350 -Natsios, in Diehl February 16 – No Class February 18 – Economic Cooperation and Development Readings: Mingst & Karns, Chapter 5 February 23 – Human Security and the Environment Readings: Mingst & Karns, Chapter 7 February 25 – Case Study: The Global Politics of Climate Change Quiz #2 Readings: “Caring for Climate 2005: A Guide to the Climate Change Convention and the Kyoto Protocol” (Carmen; or at /resource/docs/publications/caring2005 ) March 2 – The UN: Problems and Reform Readings: -Mingst & Karns, Chapter 8 -Alger, in Diehl March 4 – Globalization and Its Effects Paper Due Readings: None March 9 – Case Study: WTO Dispute Settlement Readings: Iida, in Diehl March 11 – Unilateralism versus Multilateralism Readings: -Stephen Walt, “Taming American Power,” Foreign Affairs Sept.2005 (Carmen; or through OSCAR) -Ramesh Thakur, “The Responsibility to Protect,” In The United Nations, Peace and Security (Carmen) March 18 (Wednesday) Final Exam: 1:30 – 3:18 GLOBAL GOVERNANCE Political Science 556 Prof.Jennifer Mitzen Spring 2008 Derby 2072 T / Th 1:30 – 3:18 email protected BL 311 Office Hrs: Mon 2:30 p.TA: Jason Keiber, email protected Derby 2012 Office Hrs: Thurs 11 a.Course Description In the past decade, global governance has emerged as a central challenge in world politics.

States have become increasingly aware of problems that transcend sovereign boundaries and of the need for ongoing, concerted action to address those problems.There also is a growing 351 sense that problems that might not at first seem to be international, such as failed states or human rights violations, in fact demand the attention of an international community that values human rights and democracy.Not just states, but the UN, NGO ‟s, the media, and the general public play important roles in all of these issues.The growing salience of these problems suggests that new understandings of security, and of the community that needs to be kept secure, are beginning to take shape at the global level.Parts I and II consider structures and actors in global governance.We then turn in Part III to policy instruments or tools actors use to attempt to steer global outcomes, among them sanctions, intervention, and international criminal law.The course concludes with a case study of failed global governance: the international community ‟s response to the Rwandan genocide.Students also are expected to have read the assigned material prior to class.Participation is not required, but is strongly encouraged.Students who consistently participate in class in an active and informed manner can expect that, at the margins, their grade will be bumped up.There will be two, 20-minute, in-class quizzes, on Tuesday, April 15 and Tuesday April 29.

There will be an inclass, blue book exam on Thursday May 8.No books, notes, or other aids will be permitted for the quizzes or exam.2 352 Quizzes and exams must be taken when scheduled, except in the case of a documented medical or family emergency.In the latter cases, the quiz or exam must be made up within one week; it is the student‟s responsibility to schedule the make-up quiz/exam with the TA.

Take-Home Final Essay (6 pages): A single essay question will be handed out on the last day of class and will be due seven days later.Essays are due in the CARMEN drop-box on Thursday June 5, by 3 p.Alternatively, students can turn their papers in via email to Jason Keiber, email protected , also on Thursday June 5, by 3 p.

It is the student‟s responsibility to ensure the paper has been received.The due date for the final essay is firm.However, in exceptional circumstances, a 24-hour extension may be granted.Such extensions must be requested by noon, Wednesday June 4, and require documentation of family or medical emergency.Papers turned in late, without prior authorization of an extension, will be penalized.

Grade schedule Quizzes (10% each): 20% Midterm: 30% Final Exam: 50% Academic Misconduct It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( /info for students/ ).Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; ( ).

Readings There is one required book, and it is available for purchase at SBX Bookstore: 3 353 o Barnett, Michael (2002) Eyewitness to a Genocide: The United Nations and Rwanda (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press).All remaining readings are required, and are available through CARMEN., April 1 Organizational Meeting and Overview PART I: STRUCTURES OF GLOBAL GOVERNANCE Thurs., April 3 Anarchy, Society, and Hierarchy Rosenau, James N.(1995) – “Governance in the Twenty-First Century,” Global Governance, 1, 1 (winter), 13-43., April 8 International Law I: Sovereignty-Based Armstrong, David (1999) – “Law, Justice and the Idea of a World Society,” International Affairs, 75, 3, 547-561.

Arend, Anthony Clark (2003) – “International Law and the Preemptive Use of Military Force,” Washington Quarterly, 26, 89-103.Feinstein, Lee and Anne-Marie Slaughter (2004) – “A Duty to Prevent,” Foreign Affairs, January/February, 136-150., April 10 International Law II: The Human Rights Regime Evans, Gareth and Mohamed Sahnoun (2002) – “The Responsibility to Protect,” Foreign Affairs, November/December, 99-111.Goldsmith, Jack (1998) – “International Human Rights Law and the United States Double Standard,” Green Bag, Summer, 365-373.

Roth, Kenneth (2004) – “The Law of War in the War on Terror,” Foreign Affairs, January/February, 2-7.Wedgwood, Ruth and Kenneth Roth (2004) – “Combatants or Criminals? How Washington Should Handle Terrorists,” Foreign Affairs, May/June, 4 pages.Communitarianism QUIZ Nussbaum, Martha (1996) – “Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism,” in J.

, For Love of Country: Debating the Limits of Patriotism (Cambridge, MA: Beacon Press), pp.Replies by: Nathan Glazer, Charles Taylor, Michael Walzer, and Martha Nussbaum.(1999) – “Redefining the National Interest,” Foreign Affairs, July/August, 2235., April 17 Democracy in Global Governance Dahl, Robert (1999) – “Can International Organizations be Democratic? A Skeptic ‟s View,” in I., Democracy’s Edges (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), pp.Bienen, Dirk (1998) – “Democracy in the United Nations System,” in D., Re-Imagining Political Community (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press), pp., April 22 States and Multilateral Cooperation Abbott, Kenneth and Duncan Snidal (1998) – “Why States Act Through Formal International Organizations,” Journal of Conflict Resolution, 42, 3-32.

(2004) – “NATO and the Wider World: From Regional Collective Defence to Global Coalitions of the Willing,” Australian Journal of International Affairs , 58, 33-46., April 24 The European Union Manners, Ian (2002) – “Normative Power Europe: A Contradiction in Terms?,” Journal of Common Market Studies, 40, 235-258.Kupchan, Charles (2004/5) – “The Travails of Union: The American Experience and its Implications for Europe,” Survival, 46, 103-120.

, April 29 The United Nations QUIZ Cronin, Bruce (2001) – “The Paradox of Hegemony: America ‟s Ambiguous Relationship with the United Nations,” European Journal of International Relations , 7, 103130.Glennon, Michael (2003) – “Why the Security Council Failed,” Foreign Affairs, May/June, 16-35.Responses to Glennon by Edward Luck, Anne Marie Slaughter, and Ian Hurd, Foreign Affairs, 82, 201-205., May 1 Non-Governmental Organizations and Global Civil Society Keck, Margaret and Kathryn Sikkink (1998) – “Transnational Advocacy Networks in International Politics: An Introduction,” chapter one in Activists Beyond Borders: Advocacy Networks in International Politics (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press), pp.Kaldor, Mary (2003) – “The Idea of Global Civil Society,” International Affairs, 79, 583-593., May 6 The Media Dauber, Cori (2001) – “Image as Argument: The Impact of Mogadishu on U.

Military Intervention,” Armed Forces & Society, 27, 205-229.Robinson, Piers (1999) “The CNN effect: Can the News Media Drive Foreign Policy?” Review of International Studies, 25, 301-309.Naim, Moises (2007) – “The YouTube Effect,” Foreign Policy, January/February, 2 pages.Lynch, Marc (2005) – “Watching al-Jazeera,” Wilson Quarterly, 29 (Summer), 10 pages.

, May 8 MIDTERM EXAM 6 356 PART III: ENFORCEMENT Tues., May 13 Sanctions Gordon, Joy (1999) – “A Peaceful, Silent, Deadly Remedy: The Ethics of Economic Sanctions,” Ethics and International Affairs, 13: 123-142.Lopez, George (1999) – “More Ethical than Not: Sanctions as Surgical Tools,” Ethics and International Affairs, 13, 143-148.Gordon, Joy (1999) – “Reply to George A Lopez‟s „More Ethical than Not,” Ethics and International Affairs, 13, 149-150.

Lopez, George, and David Cortright (2004) “Containing Iraq: Sanctions Worked,” Foreign Affairs, 83, 90-103., May 15 Humanitarian Military Intervention Williams, Paul and Alex Bellamy (2005) – “The Responsibility to Protect and the Crisis in Darfur,” Security Dialogue, 36, 27-47.(1998) – “Humanitarian Intervention: An Overview of the Ethical Issues,” Ethics and International Affairs, 12, 63-80.

, May 20 Occupation / Peace-Building Chesterman, Simon (2004) – “Occupation as Liberation: International Humanitarian Law and Regime Change,” Ethics and International Affairs, 18, 51-64.Etzioni, Amitai (2004) – “A Self-Restrained Approach to Nation-Building by Foreign Powers,” International Affairs, 80, 1-17., May 22 International Criminal Law and the ICC Rodman, Kenneth A.

(2006) – “Compromising Justice: Why the Bush Administration and the NGO‟s are both Wrong about the ICC,” Ethics and International Affairs, 20, 1 (March), pp.Rubin, Elizabeth (2006) – “If Not Peace, then Justice,” New York Times Magazine, April 2, 11 pages.Kissinger, Henry (2001) – “The Pitfalls of Universal Jurisdiction,” Foreign Affairs, 80, July/August, 86-97.7 357 Roth, Kenneth (2001) – “Response: The Case for Universal Jurisdiction,” Foreign Affairs, 80, Sept/Oct, 150-154.

, May 27 The Case of Rwanda Barnett, Michael (2002) Eyewitness to a Genocide: The United Nations and Rwanda (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press)., May 29 Post-Conflict Justice Drumbl, Mark (2002) – “Restorative Justice and Collective Responsibility: Lessons for and from the Rwandan Genocide,” Contemporary Justice Review, 5, 5-22.** Final Exam Essay Question distributed in class ** Thurs.

Political Science 559 International Environmental Politics Course Syllabus Professor Alexander Thompson Department of Political Science 2139 Derby Hall email protected Course Description Many of today’s environment and resources problem are transnational in nature and cannot be solved by governments acting in isolation of each other.And yet we find again and again that politics get in the way of successful action at the international level.

The goal of this course is to explore the political underpinnings of global environmental problems and to both summarize and evaluate existing efforts to solve them.In sum, this course offers a history and analysis of environmental politics from the perspective of international relations.The first part of the course establishes basic theoretical tools and concepts for understanding international environmental politics.We begin by discussing theories of collective action and commons management at the local level, and then turn to international theories of cooperation and regimes.We then outline the various actors and institutions, both governmental and non-governmental, involved in international environmental politics.

The second part of the course takes up three themes of importance to policy and to the academic literature: sustainable development, the environment and security, and the compliance and effectiveness of international regimes.The third and final part of the course applies concepts from the course to case studies of two of the most important and controversial areas of environmental politics: international fisheries management and global climate change.358 Course Requirements Students are expected to attend every class session and to keep themselves updated on current events involving global environmental politics (we will begin every Wednesday session with a discussion of current events).I will circulate a handout listing relevant websites and periodicals.Graded assignments include: a midterm exam and a final exam, two 7-page papers (details outlined on the next page).

The exams will test course readings as well as information covered during class sessions, including our discussions of current events.Note that class lectures and discussion will often cover material that is not covered in the course texts, so receiving a good grade in this course requires that you attend class and do the readings.The final grade will be determined as follows: Midterm exam (Oct.26) 30% 30% 20% 20% Required Books The following required books are available at SBX: • Pamela Chasek, David Downie and Janet Welsh Brown.Green Planet Blues: Environmental Politics from Stockholm to Johannesburg, 3rd Ed.(hereafter: Conca & Dabelko) Readings that are not from these books are either in the course packet or are available online, as noted below.Paper Assignment #1 (due in class on October 15) The paper should be no more than seven double-spaced pages.Choose an international environmental organization to analyze, either an intergovernmental organization or a non-governmental organization.Describe its mission, its structure, and its major activities.Then offer an answer to the two following question.

First, what are the most important accomplishments of this organization? Second, what are its major weaknesses? Third, what are the main obstacles to its success? Please talk to me once you have selected an organization to get the subject approved.359 Paper Assignment #2 (due in class November 26) The paper should be no more than seven double-spaced pages.You are writing a memo to the President recommending an international climate change policy.Explain what goals need to be achieved and what problems exist with existing policy in light of these goals.Then propose a new approach and describe why it will achieve the stated goals more effectively than the existing approach.

You should also alert the President to the likely political opponents, both domestic and international, to your proposed plan.You may choose to offer a comprehensive policy or you may focus on a particular aspect of climate policy.Every student must meet with me to have their topic approved.Academic Misconduct It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.

The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct ( /info for students/ ).Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; /.

COURSE OUTLINE AND READINGS WEEK 1 September 19.Why international and why politics? WEEK 2: Collective Action and the Commons 360 Septmeber 24.The Tragedy of the Commons Readings: -Meadows, Meadows, Randers & Behrens, “The Limits to Growth,” in Conca & Dabelko -Garrett Hardin, “The Tragedy of the Commons,” in Conca & Dabelko September 26.

Responses to the Tragedy Readings: -Susan Buck, “No Tragedy of the Commons,” in Conca & Dabelko -Thomas Dietz, Elinor Ostrom & Paul Stern, “The Struggle to Govern the Commons,” Science (December 2003): pp.

1907-12 -Elinor Ostrom, “Understanding Collective Action,” 2020 Focus No.11 (February 2004), /2020/focus/focus11/focus11 WEEK 3: The International Context October 1.Anarchy and International Cooperation Readings: -Kenneth Waltz, Theory of International Politics, Chapter 5 -Kenneth Oye, “Explaining Cooperation under Anarchy: Strategies and Institutions,” in -Oye, ed.Theories of International Regimes Readings: -Chasek et al.-Robert Keohane, After Hegemony, Chapter 1 WEEK 4: Actors and Levels of Analysis October 8.

Governments and International Organizations Readings: -Chasek et al.41-73 -UN Environment Program, “Multilateral Environmental Agreements: A Summary,” in Conca & Dabelko October 10.NGOs and Corporations Readings: -Paul Wapner, “Politics beyond the State: Environmental Activism and World Civic Politics,” in Conca & Dabelko -Chasek et al.73-94 361 WEEK 5: Sustainable Development October 15.Alternative Views on Growth: Stockholm to Rio *paper #1 due* Readings: -World Commission on Environment and Development, “Towards Sustainable Development,” in Conca & Dabelko -Chasek et al.Free Trade and the Environment Readings: -Chasek et al.

243-61 -Tony Juniper, “Presentation to the World Trade Organization Symposium,” in Conca & Dabelko -Daniel Esty, “Environment and the Trading System: Picking Up the Post-Seattle Pieces,” in Conca & Dabelko WEEK 6: Environment and Security October 22.Conflict and Human Security Readings: -Thomas Homer-Dixon, “Environmental Scarcities and Violent Conflict: Evidence from Cases,” in Conca & Dabelko -Adil Najam, “The Human Dimensions of Environmental Insecurity,” in Conca & Dabelko October 24.Midterm Exam WEEK 7: Environmental Regimes: Compliance and Effectiveness October 29.Compliance with International Rules Readings: Chasek et al.

What Makes International Regimes Effective? Readings: 362 -Ronald Mitchell, “Compliance Theory: Compliance, Effectiveness, and Behavior Change in International Environmental Law,” in Oxford Handbook of International Environmental Law (2007) WEEK 8: International Fisheries Cooperation November 5.The History of the Law of the Sea Readings: -Chasek et al.Migratory and Straddling Stocks Readings: -Alexander Thompson, “Canadian Foreign Policy and Straddling Stocks: Sustainability in an Interdependent World,” Policy Studies Journal 28(2000).History and Institutions Readings: -Chasek et al.

115-28 -Climate Change Secretariat, “Caring for Climate 2003: A Guide to the Climate Change Convention and the Kyoto Protocol,” /resource/docs/publications/caring WEEK 10: Climate Change II November 19.Climate and International Cooperation Readings: -Ronald Mitchell, “Flexibility, Compliance and Norm Development in the Climate Regime,” in Schram et al.-Alexander Thompson, “Management under Anarchy: The International Politics of Climate Change,” Climatic Change 78 (2006) November 21.Climate Policy Readings: -Daniel Bodansky, “U.Climate Policy after Kyoto: Elements for Success,” Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Policy Brief #15 (2002) /files/ 363 WEEK 11: Looking Ahead November 26.Beyond (and Below) Kyoto: Regional and Local Action *paper #2 due* Readings: -Eileen Claussen and Elliot Diringer, “A New Climate Treaty: U.Leadership After Kyoto,” Harvard International Review 29(1).

/articles/1594/ -Pew Center on Global Climate Change, “Climate Change 101: State Action” and “Climate Change 101: Local Action.

Buy an coursework ecology originality british 132 pages / 36300 words writing from scratch double spaced

” /globalwarming-basics/climate change 101 November 28.Should There Be a Global Environmental Organization? Reading: Daniel Esty and Maria Ivanova, “Making Environmental Efforts Work: The Case for a Global Environmental Organization,” Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy.Political Science 571 Theories of Democracy Winter 2009 Professor Michael Neblo 11:30-1:18 Email: email protected 2:30 Telephone: 614- 292-7839 Hall Class: T/R O 1079 Combined Syllabi Enviromental Citizen Course Syllabus AED nbsp.Political Science 571 Theories of Democracy Winter 2009 Professor Michael Neblo 11:30-1:18 Email: email protected 2:30 Telephone: 614- 292-7839 Hall Class: T/R O.

Hrs: T 1:302114 Derby 364 This course is an advanced survey of theories of democracy.Among other topics, we will investigate: competing definitions of democracy, the relations between democracy and other values, participation and representation, deliberation, and conception of diversity and identity 18 Apr 2013 - Still, as the seasons change, so does the cuisine. It is time to embrace the beauty of the coming spring and ALL that is has to offer. With that being said, we present the next theme in our “Pop Up” restaurant series…Nature's Gift, The Bounty of Spring. On May 18th, I will showcase a fresh and colorful menu of  .Among other topics, we will investigate: competing definitions of democracy, the relations between democracy and other values, participation and representation, deliberation, and conception of diversity and identity.The readings are organized thematically, but we will explore many concepts through the lens of both historical and contemporary thinkers.This course is a core course in the Critical and Cultural Theory minor.

Information regarding the minor and its requirements may be found online at /interdisciplinary.Course Requirements There are three main course requirements: 1.Seminar participation: I have high expectations for attendance and class preparation.In addition to you being expected to volunteer your views during discussion, you may be called upon at random.Some of these readings are dense and difficult, so I strongly encourage you to take notes as you read, and whenever possible, to read them twice and/or discuss them with classmates before the class session.

I do not expect you to come to class with all the "right" answers.However, I do expect you to come to class having thought seriously about our texts and the questions they raise."A" level participation involves demonstrating consistently high levels of engagement with the readings, as well as insightfully connecting them to each other, the course themes, other students' contributions, real politics, etc.General seminar participation will count for 30% of the final course grade.In addition to general participation, each member of the class will be assigned the role of "point person" for one class session.

This role involves turning in a formally written set of comments on the readings (about three pages), and making a short (about 5 minute) class presentation designed to spark discussion.Your discussion, presentation, and written responses for this session will count for 10% of your final grade.Quizzes: I will give several short, unannounced quizzes to check for preparation and understanding.The quizzes will not be difficult if you have done the readings for that class session.

The combined quizzes will count for 10% of your final grade.Final paper: One 9-12 page paper on a subject of the seminar member’s choice, relevant to the course themes, and contingent on my prior approval.This paper will count for 40% of the final course grade and is due on March 16 th by noon in electronic format (MSWord is preferred).When you email me the paper, you should not consider it received until you get a confirmation response from me.

Colleague comments: For the March 10th meeting you will be expected to produce a written set of comments on three other seminar members’ draft papers, using substantive and Booth et.The colleague comments will count for 10% of your final grade.

Academic Misconduct It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; 365 illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct: ( /resource ).I require electronic copies of your paper because they will be run through a software program designed to detect plagiarism from the web, as well as a database of papers turned in at OSU.

I do this not because I do not trust you.I believe that the vast majority of students are honest.I even believe that most students who plagiarize do so, not because they are generally dishonest, but because they panic in the end of term crush.I check for plagiarism to reassure students who do their own work that they are not chumps, and to help students who are tempted to plagiarize under pressure to avoid making a decision that they will come to regret.Disability Services Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.

The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; /.A note on academic integrity: Course Materials Toni Morrison Beloved All other course materials and readings will be available on Carmen.Students with disabilities should make their needs known to the instructor and seek available assistance in the first week of the quarter.For course materials in alternative formats please see Mr.Wayne DeYoung, 2140 Derby Hall, 292-2880, also in the first week of the quarter.Schedule of Readings for Class Meetings January 6th Introduction January 8th Democratic Theory & the Modern Politician Weber: Politics as a Vocation Clinton: Announcement Speech McCain: Announcement Speech Obama: Announcement Speech 366 January 13th Early American Democratic Theory Madison et.: from The Federalist Papers Tocqueville: from Democracy in America January 15th Representation and the Critique of Ambitious Democracy Burke: Speech to the Electors of Bristol Schumpeter: from Socialism, Capitalism, and Democracy Lincoln/FDR/Kennedy: Inaugural Speeches January 20th Religion & Toleration in a Democracy Martin Luther The Christian in Society John Calvin God and Political Duty John Locke Letter Concerning Toleration John Kennedy Speech on Religion Mitt Romney Speech on Religion January 22nd The Limits of Toleration in Democracy Marcuse Repressive Tolerance January 27th Justice in Modern Democracies I Rawls: from A Theory of Justice Nozick: from Anarchy, State, Utopia January 29th Justice in Modern Democracies II Sandel: from Liberalism & the Limits of Justice MacIntyre: from Whose Justice, Which Rationality? February 3rd Deliberative Democracy Dewey: The Problem of Method Habermas: The Public Sphere Fishkin: Giving the People Voice 367 February 5th Freedom in Modern Democracies I Mill from On Liberty Isaiah Berlin Two Concepts of Liberty February 10th Freedom in Modern Democracies II Habermas Three Normative Models of Democracy February 12th Writing Seminar/Paper Planning Booth et.February 17th Equality in Modern Democracies Rousseau: Discourse on Inequality Burke: Reflections on the Revolution in France Walzer: In Defense of Equality February 19th Power and the Corrosion of True Democracy? Gaventa: from Power & Powerlessness February 24th Democratic Theory as Democratic Culture I Rorty: Introduction and Chapters 1 & 2 (CIS) February 26th Democratic Theory as Democratic Culture II Rorty: Chapters 3, 4 & 9 (CIS) March 3rd Democratic Theory as Democratic Culture III Morrison Chapters 1-14 March 5th Democratic Theory as Democratic Culture IV Morrison Chapters 15-28 (Paper drafts due.) March 10th Paper Workshop Read colleague draft papers.

March 12th Course Review and Summation; Paper Meetings Review Weber selection from first meeting.Work o 368 PS 580 STATE AND ECONOMY Autumn 2008 Professor Sara Watson T-Th, 11:30-1:18 Smith Laboratory 1009 Office Hours: 2104 Derby Hall, W 4-6 pm Email: email protected COURSE DESCRIPTION This course examines the interaction between politics and markets, both in theory and in practice, linking classic theoretical works on political economy (Smith, Marx, List) with current policy debates.It emphasizes the ways in which markets are embedded in social and political institutions.We study how political systems and markets are organized in a wide range of different national settings, looking both at history and contemporary issues.Substantive topics include: 1) The history of industrialization, 2) The varieties of capitalism in contemporary industrialized countries, 3) The Newly Industrializing Economies of East Asia and Latin America, 4) The problems of development, 5) The transition from communism to a market economy in Eastern Europe and China.

Some background in economics recommended but not required.COURSE REQUIREMENTS Midterm Class participation and e-mail memos Final exam 25% of course grade 35% 40% READING ASSIGNMENTS Books for purchase: Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations (2003, Alan Krueger, ed.), The Marx-Engels Reader (1978- 2nd edition)** Milton Friedman, Capitalism and Freedom (1962) David Landes, The Wealth and Poverty of Nations (1999) Karl Polanyi, The Great Transformation (1944)—any edition is fine.

Joseph Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents (2002) **Note: Smith and Marx required reading, but you may either (a) purchase the book editions listed above; or 369 (b) download the online versions, which are hyperlinked later in the syllabus.All other readings for the course will be posted on Carmen.These are marked with an asterisk (*) on the syllabus.WARNING You should be prepared to commit a lot of time to this course.This is more than a class about learning different theories.

This class is about grappling with ideas, analyzing political and economic theory—and about figuring out how theories of political economy are linked to each other, how they shape each other.My central goal in this course is that you come away with a strong sense of how everything “fits together.” As a result, however, his course is intensive and it is intense.We’ll be blazing through a lot of material.Note that the readings for this course average around 150 pages per week.

And it isn’t just the reading that takes time (although it will): you’ll also need time to reflect carefully on each reading.I am not, however, planning to throw you into the deep end with no help.I will send you study questions before each class to help guide you through the readings.I strongly recommend that you do the reading and try to answer the study questions BEFORE you come to class.These questions will help clarify what they main concepts and arguments that I want you to get out of the readings.

Once you’ve done the readings and tried to answer the study questions, come to class armed with questions.What did you find confusing or unclear? After lecture, I highly recommend that you go back to the study questions and see if you can fill in some of the gaps from the first time around.This will be indispensable preparation for your midterm and final.WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS: WEB SITE POSTINGS Five postings, due 5 p.the afternoon before the relevant class.Write a one-paragraph memo (150 words maximum) on the readings for the day and post it to the course web site on Carmen by 5 p.the afternoon before the relevant class.Include a short title for your memo on the subject line.

We will discuss some of the memos in class.You MUST post a memo on at least one of the first four sets of readings (Smith, Marx, List, Polanyi), and then post at least one memo every two weeks until you have completed all four The memos may take a variety of forms: 1) Critique one or more of the readings, 2) Relate the readings to a recent news story or news commentary, 3) Write your own question on the readings and answer it, 4) Propose a topic for discussion that relates to the readings, 5) Answer one of the study questions.Do not summarize – you may assume that your classmates have done the readings.You are encouraged to experiment with this assignment: do not answer the study questions more than twice during the semester.

ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT 370 It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.

The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct: ( /resource ).Disability Services: Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; /.

371 PART I: CONTENDING PERSPECTIVES ON POLITICAL ECONOMY Readings marked with an asterisk (*) will be uploaded onto Carmen.Week 1: Course Introduction No readings Week 2: Adam Smith and Liberal Political Economy Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations, Book 1, ch.Milton Friedman, Capitalism and Freedom, 1-6, 196-202.

Marxist Political Economy Marx, “The Production of Surplus Value,” part III, Chapter VII, section 2 of Capital, Vol.351-361 in Tucker, The Marx-Engels Reader.Alternatively, an online version of Capital is available here.Marx and Engels, Communist Manifesto (in Tucker, ed.

The Marx-Engels Reader, or here) Week 3: List and Mercantilist Political Economy * Friedrich List, The National System of Political Economy (1916), 108-56 * James Fallows, Looking at the Sun: The Rise of the New East Asian Economic and Political System (1994), 177-207.Polanyi and Sociological Perspectives Polanyi, ch.* Fred Block, “Rethinking Capitalism,” in Biggart, ed., Readings in Economic Sociology (2002), 219-30.

372 Week 4: The New Institutional Economics * Douglass North, Structure and Change in Economic History (1981), 3-44.Markets and Democracy * Charles Lindblom, Politics and Markets (1977), 3-13, 144-169, 201-21 Milton Friedman, 7-21.* Kuttner, Everything for Sale (1996), 328-62.PART II: VARIETIES OF CAPITALISM IN THE INDUSTRIALIZED COUNTRIES Week 5: Early Development * Eric Hobsbawm, Industry and Empire (1968), 1-39.David Landes, The Wealth and Poverty of Nations, 186-230.

MIDTERM EXAM - THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23 Covers material from Smith through “Markets and Democracy” (Weeks 1-4) Week 6: Late Development * W.Rostow, The Stages of Economic Growth (1962), 1-16.* Alexander Gerschenkron, Economic Backwardness in Historical Perspective (1962), 5-30.Landes, The Wealth and Poverty of Nations, 256-75.

The Varieties of Capitalism: Macro- and Micro-Institutions * Charles Lindblom, Politics and Markets (1977), 107-116.373 * John Zysman, Governments, Markets and Growth (1983), Cornell University Press, 285-99.* Hall and Soskice, Varieties of Capitalism (2000), Oxford University Press, 144.Week 7: Regulation and Deregulation * Kuttner, Everything for Sale (1996), 159-90, 225-39, 275-80.* Steven Vogel, Freer Markets, More Rules (1996), 1-5.

PART III: THE DILEMMAS OF DEVELOPMENT Dependency Theory and Dependent Development * Andre Gunder Frank, "The Development of Underdevelopment," Monthly Review, Vol.* Peter Evans, Dependent Development (1979), 14-34.Week 8: Veterans’ Day—No class (Tuesday) Dependency Theory Challenged: The East Asian NICs * Chalmers Johnson, "Political Institutions and Economic Performance: The Government-Business Relationship in Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan," in Deyo, ed.

, The Political Economy of the New Asian Industrialism (1987), 136-64.* Paul Krugman, "The Myth of Asia's Miracle," Foreign Affairs (Nov.1994), 62-78; and "Letters to the Editor," Foreign Affairs (March/April 1995), 170-77.Stiglitz, 53-88 374 Week 9: Colonial Legacies and Development * David Potter, “The Power of Colonial States,” Chapter 12 in Poverty and Development in the 21st Century (2000).

David Landes, 512-524 The Resource Curse and Under-Development in Africa * Michael Watts, “The Scramble for Africa,” Monthly Review, 2006.* Catholic Relief Services, “Bottom of the Barrel: Africa’s Oil Boom and the Poor” 2006.PART IV: POST-COMMUNIST TRANSITIONS Week 10: Creating Markets in Post-Communist Societies * Jeffrey Sachs, The End of Poverty (2005), 109-136, 145-7.Thanksgiving Holiday – no class on Thursday Week 11: Political and Economic Reforms in China * Doug Guthrie, China and Globalization (2006), 1-19, 38-72.

PART V: PROSPECTS FOR THE FUTURE Globalization: What Future for Varieties of Capitalism? * Tom Friedman, 3-16, 101-11, 145-66, 276-305, 327-47.* Francis Fukuyama, "The End of History?," The National Interest (Summer 1989), 3-18.375 1 PS 580: STATE AND ECONOMY Irfan Nooruddin Winter Quarter 2009 The Ohio State University Time: TR 9:30 – 11:18 am Location: 0305 Dreese Laboratories 2084 Derby Hall Office Hours: F 2:00 – 3:00 pm E-mail: email protected “Those who know how to think need not teachers.” – Mahatma Gandhi “As revolutionaries, we are not afraid of confrontation.

” —Fidel Castro, Address to the UN General Assembly, 1978.How do governments shape the economy? and vice versa? These are the fundamental questions addressed in this course.The course will combine lecture and discussion with two in-class examinations forming the basis for the grade.The only prerequisite is a desire to learn.Over the next two months we will grapple with a number of fascinating intellectual puzzles.

At times clear-cut answers will seem nonexistent but in our journey towards understanding we will gain the analytical skills to study issues concerning comparative politics.If there is a cardinal rule for this class, it is simply this: we do not know the truth.There is no right or wrong answer per se.As political scientists our purpose is to examine hypotheses using diverse methodologies in the hope of disproving some and finding stronger evidence for others.All we have is data and all we can do with it is analyze it.

So leave preconceived notions of “how the world works” – or should work – at the door and enter this classroom with an open mind.The Great Adventure “A college is where people of varying degrees of ignorance sit around trying to make their ignorance less”— President Lowry, The College of Wooster, August 1960.“And so I have always thought that the best way to find out what is right and what is not right, what should be done and what should not be done, is not by giving a sermon, but by talking and discussing, and out of discussion sometimes a little bit of the truth comes out.” — Jawaharlal Nehru, Glimpses of World History.Being relatively few, our class sessions will cover less material than the assigned readings; consequently they are even more selective and more interpretative than the readings.

The purpose of discussions is to give you an opportunity to engage the material and to analyze it immediately, directly, and creatively.Students are 376 encouraged to raise questions as they occur to them — to think out loud while the idea is still fresh.Be sure to ask a question whenever a word or concept is unfamiliar to you and to keep them in your notes.Class will generally begin with a chance for you to raise questions based upon the previous reading, discussion, assignment or lecture.If you are puzzled or unsure about something chances are that other members of the class are too! Asking questions is emphatically not an interruption.

Rather, it is a crucial and essential feature of a good class.Remember, if you already knew the answers, you wouldn’t need to take the class.ASKING QUESTIONS IS NOT AN ADMISSION OF IGNORANCE; IT IS AN ATTACK ON IT.2 If this is going to work, you must do all the assigned readings before we meet for class.There are no exceptions to this expectation.

I sincerely encourage you to cultivate the habit of taking good reading notes.While this greatly increases the amount of time it takes to do the reading, you will find that it enhances your learning and retention of the material.After all, if a book is worth reading, it is worth reading with some care and attention.Of course some of the material will be fairly complex and you may not understand it when you first read through it.Three suggestions: 1) Re-read the piece, 2) Re-reread the piece, and 3) Ask questions in class.

Assignments Required MIDTERM 40% Thursday, February 12 FINAL EXAM 60% Monday, March 16 ATTENDANCE Each absence results in a one-third grade (A to A-) deduction overall.Extra Credit You will have the opportunity to participate in the Department of Political Science’s Human Subject Pool for up to two experiments this quarter.For each experiment in which you participate, one absence will be forgiven.If you have no absences all quarter, then each experiment in which you participate will lead to an additional 3 points on your mid-term examination grade (added post hoc at the end of the term).No Credit If you are interested, I invite you to write a 20-page research paper on a topic of your choice.

We can discuss potential topics in office hours.The paper would be due during finals week.Policies and Procedures Students with Disabilities Students who feel they need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact me privately to discuss their specific needs.Please contact the Office of Disability Services at 614292-3307 in Room 150 Pomerene Hall to coordinate reasonable accomodations.Extensions and Make-ups 377 Extensions will not be granted.

You will be informed of all assignments well in advance, so good planning and time management skills will benefit you.Assignments must be handed to me in class on the day they are due (or before that date if you want).Late assignments will suffer a penalty of half a letter grade per day it is late.There will be no opportunities for extra credit.

Academic Dishonesty Academic integrity is essential to maintaining an environment that fosters excellence in teaching, research, and other educational and scholarly activities.

Thus, The Ohio State University and the Committee on Academic Misconduct (COAM) expect that all students have read and understand the University’s Code of Student Conduct, and that all students will complete all academic and scholarly assignments with fairness and honesty.Students must recognize that failure to follow the rules and guidelines established in the University’s Code of Student Conduct and this syllabus may constitute “Academic Misconduct.” The Ohio State University’s Code of Student Conduct (Section 3335-23-04) defines academic misconduct as: “Any activity that tends to compromise the academic integrity of the University, or subvert the educational process.” Examples of academic misconduct include (but are not limited to) plagiarism, collusion (unauthorized collaboration), copying the work of another student, and possession of unauthorized materials during an examination.Ignorance of the University’s Code of Student Conduct is never considered an “excuse” for academic misconduct, so I recommend that you review the Code of Student Conduct and, specifically, the sections dealing with academic misconduct.

3 If I suspect that a student has committed academic misconduct in this course, I am obligated by University Rules to report my suspicions to the Committee on Academic Misconduct.If COAM determines that you have violated the University’s Code of Student Conduct (i., committed academic misconduct), the sanctions for the misconduct could include a failing grade in this course and suspension or dismissal from the University.If you have any questions about the above policy or what constitutes academic misconduct in this course, please contact me.

Other sources of information on academic misconduct (integrity) to which you can refer include: * The Committee on Academic Misconduct web pages ( /coam/ ) * Ten Suggestions for Preserving Academic Integrity ( /coam/ ) * Eight Cardinal Rules of Academic Integrity ( /uacc/ ) E-mail E-mail is the best way to stay in touch with me but I insist on two rules if this interaction is to be mutually beneficial.While I will do my best to reply to you promptly, I feel no obligation to do so within a few hours of receiving your e-mail.Nor am I obligated to check my e-mail 378 every hour so there’s a distinct possibility that I sometimes won’t see your e-mail for a day or two after it’s sent.If I don’t respond within a week, then it’s entirely appropriate (and appreciated) if you remind me politely.

Second, while some, more avant-garde and sophisticated than I, would abandon all rules of spelling, punctuation, and grammar when one is writing e-mail, I resist the temptation to do the same and insist that all official correspondence with me conform to standard rules of academic writing.Grading Grading will be based upon (a) accuracy of factual information; (b) ability to synthesize the appropriate evidence, both theoretical and empirical, from all parts of the course not just rehashing the texts; (c) judgment in separating the important from the trivial, keeping on the subject, critically evaluating all assumptions including your own and mine ; and (d) effective expression—organization, choice of words, basic grammar, etc.These are the essentials; imagination and true originality are based on them and not a substitute for them.Work Ethic “Without struggle, there can be no progress”—Frederick Douglass From the Faculty Rules (Rule 3355-8-24 A1): “One credit hour shall be assigned for each three hours per week of the average student’s time, including class hours, required to earn the average grade of ‘C’ in this class.The value of this class to you will be in direct proportion to the amount of time and effort that you devote to it.If there is a question in your mind as to whether you want to complete all the work in this course you should consider enrolling in another course without delay.I will give you my best effort, and I expect nothing less from you.****** Inqil b Zindab d Question Assumptions ****** What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty or democracy? -- Mahatma Gandhi, 1869-1948, “Non-violence in Peace and War.” 4 The Smorgasbord REQUIRED 1 A coursepack of readings is available for purchase from the usual suspects or directly from Zip Publishing ( ).

Determinants of Economic Growth: A Cross-country Empirical Study .(ISBN: 0393974014) 4 Lindblom, Charles.The Market System: What It Is, How It Works, and What To Make of It.(ISBN: 0300093349) 5 Marx, Karl, and Freidrich Engels.

Has Globalization Gone Too Far? Washington, DC: Institute for International Economics.

(ISBN: 0385720270) RECOMMENDED 1 Allen, John L.Student Atlas of World Politics, 4th edition.(ISBN: 0073527734) 2 Strunk, William, and .

The Elements of Style, Illustrated edition.(ISBN: 1594200696) Schedule of Readings WEEK ONE Tuesday, January 06: Getting to Know Me, Getting to Love Me, aka., Introductions Thursday, January 08: The Comparative Method 1 Robert Bates.

“Area Studies and the Discipline: A Useful Controversy,” PS: Political Science and Politics (June): 166-169.“Comparative Politics and the Comparative Method,” American Political Science Review, 65: 682-693.

WEEK TWO Tuesday, January 13: What is Development? 1 Amartya Sen.Speech at the Sixth Summit Conference of the Non-Aligned Countries .Economic Development in Perspective, Chapter 1, pp.Thursday, January 15: Beyond Growth: Gender and Equity 1 Irene Tinker.Persistent Inequalities: Women and World Development .WEEK THREE Tuesday, January 20: States and Markets 1 Charles Lindblom.“The Return to the State,” American Political Science Review, 82 (3): 853-874.3 The responses: Eric Nordlinger, Theodore Lowi, and Sergio Fabbrini.“The Return to the State: Critiques,” American Political Science Review, 82 (3): 875-901.

“The Next World Order,” New York Times (1 January)./2009/01/02/opinion/ ?partner=permalink&exprod=permalink 380 5 Thursday, January 22: Markets, Part I 1 Charles Lindblom.WEEK FOUR Tuesday, January 27: Markets, Part II 1 Charles Lindblom.Thursday, January 29: Communism and Marxist Interpretations of the State, Part I 1 Karl Marx and Freidrich Engels.WEEK FIVE Tuesday, February 03: Communism and Marxist Interpretations of the State, Part II 1 Charles Lindblom.

Thursday, February 05: Marxist Interpretations of the State, Part III 1 Ralph Milliband.

WEEK SIX Tuesday, February 10: The Corporation Thursday, February 12: Causes of Economic Development 1 W.

The Stages of Economic Growth: A non-Communist Manifesto.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Chp 2 (pp.

Economic Backwardness in Historical Perspective.Cambridge: Harvard University Press, pp.

WEEK SEVEN Tuesday, February 17: MID-TERM EXAMINATION Thursday, February 19: More on Causes of Economic Development 1 John Kenneth Galbraith.Economic Development in Perspective, Chapter 4, pp.

Determinants of Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Empirical Study .Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, Preface and Chapter 1 (pp.ix-47) WEEK EIGHT Tuesday, February 24: Government Matters 1 Douglass C.

Structure and Change in Economic History.Thursday, February 26: Institutions 1 Samuel P.WEEK NINE Tuesday, March 03: Democracy and Development 1 Pranab Bardhan.“Symposium on Democracy and Development,” Journal of Economic Perspectives, 7 (3, Summer): 45-49.“Dictatorship, Democracy, and Development,” American Political Science Review, 87 (3): 567-576.381 6 3 Bruce Bueno de Mesquita, James D.

“Political Institutions, Political Survival, and Policy Success.Determinants of Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Empirical Study .Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, Chapter 2 (pp.“The Regime Debate Revisited: A Sensitivity Analysis of Democracy’s Economic Effect,” British Journal of Political Science, 34 (4, Oct): 635-655.“Does Democracy Help the Poor?” American Journal of Political Science, 50 (4).Thursday, March 05: Globalization 1 Dani Rodrik.

Has Globalization Gone Too Far? Washington, DC: Institute for International Economics.“Globalization and Liberalization: The Impact on Developing Countries.

” In States, Markets, and Just Growth: Development in the Twenty-First Century , edited by Atul Kohli, Chung-in Moon, and Georg Sorensen.New York: United Nations University Press, pp.“Is Globalization Reducing Poverty and Inequality?” World Development, 32 (4): 567-589.WEEK TEN Tuesday, March 10: Dependency Theory 1 Paul Baran.“On the Political Economy of Backwardness,” Manchester School of Social and Economic Studies, XX (1, January): 66-84.“The Development of Underdevelopment,” Monthly Review, (Sept): 17-31.Thursday, March 12: What’s Next for the Study of Development? 1 Robert H.Prosperity and Violence: The Political Economy of Development .

“What do we know about Economic Growth? Or, Why we don’t know very much?” World Development, 29 (1): 1-22.“Understanding Patterns of Economic Growth: Searching for Hills among Plateaus, Mountains and Plains,” World Bank Economic Review, 14 (2): 221-50.WEEK ELEVEN Monday, March 16: FINAL EXAM FROM 9:30-11:18PM (NOTE THE TIME!!!!!!) “It is not communism that is radical; it is capitalism.

” ­­ Bertholt Brecht “The man who does not read books has no advantage 382 over the man who cannot read them.Instructor: Office: Office Hours: Phone: E-mail address: Dr.Papaleonardos 363B Journalism Mon & Wed, 12­1:15 p.& by appointment 688­3085 (my office) 292­6681 (Sociology Main Office) email protected COURSE OBJECTIVES The use of technology is a basic feature of all human societies, and our technologies strongly influence the way we live.Equally important but less obvious, technology itself is a product of social, economic, political and cultural patterns.This course will present perspectives, theories, and facts that will help the student understand the consequences of technological change, as well as the forces that produce it.

The increasingly rapid pace of technological change presents numerous new challenges that we must face, as individuals and as societies, and this course will touch on some of these.REQUIRED BOOKS There are 2 required books for this course: • Debora L.Spar (2001) Ruling the Waves: From the Compass to the Internet Harvest Books.• Roger Horowitz & Arwen Mohun (eds) (1998) His and Hers: Gender, Consumption, and Technology.In addition, you will be responsible for additional readings which will be distributed on cd­r.Each student must bring me a blank cd­r, and I will return it with the additional readings in .COURSE REQUIREMENTS Course grading will be based on the following requirements: 1.

Each student will write a 3­4 page paper on Deborah Spar’s book.(A separate handout will be distributed with the details of this assignment).Paper on Gender and Technology (20% of course grade).

Each student will write a 4­5 page critical review of Horowitz and Mohun’s book.(A separate handout will be distributed with the details of this assignment).Assignment on Ethics and Technology (10% of course grade).Each student will complete an assignment dealing with ethical issues and technology.

(A separate handout will detail the specifics of this assignment.384 IMPORTANT NOTES & CLASS RULES 1) Requirements are just that – requirements.To receive a passing grade in this course, you must take both exams, and complete all three papers/assignments.2) Failing (less than 60%) both exams will result in an automatic E for the course.

3) Attendance: We are not using a regular textbook; accordingly, attendance is strongly recommended as much of the course material will be covered only in class.Students are responsible for all information and material provided in lectures and readings.It is my experience that students who miss my class regularly end up struggling to earn a passing grade, and almost always earn a much lower grade than they thought they would receive.But you are adults, and are free to choose whether, and how frequently to attend class.Just remember that there are consequences to our actions and the choices we make.

Sometimes, of course, circumstances beyond our control arise and make missing class necessary; if you must miss class, be sure to get notes from someone else in the class.MY LECTURE NOTES WILL NOT BE MADE AVAILABLE, so don’t even ask.Similarly, you are responsible for all announcements made in class; it's a good idea to exchange e-mail addresses or phone numbers with 2 or 3 other students in the class so you can get lecture notes and any announcements you might have missed.If, once you get the notes from a fellow student, you still have questions about the material, I will be happy to answer those.4) Classroom Decorum: I expect all students to follow the basic rules of common courtesy in the classroom.

Cell Phones: All cellular telephones and pagers must be turned off during class.If cell phones become a problem during class, I reserve the right to publicly humiliate anyone who forgets to turn off their ringer.If you are expecting an emergency phone call, put your phone on vibrate and quietly leave the room in the event of a call.Timeliness: Students are expected to come to class on time and remain for the duration of the period.In the rare event that you feel you must leave early, tell me at the beginning of the class period and sit by the exit.You should not get up and walk out in the middle of class without letting me know ahead of time.Talking: If you would like to contribute to the class discussion, please be courteous enough to raise your hand and wait to be called on.

Please hold off on all outside or off­topic conversations with me or fellow classmates until the end of class or during break.Discussion: Please show respect and courtesy to me and your fellow students during classroom discussions.Other Distractions: I would also ask that you not read the paper, do crossword puzzles, prepare for your other classes, surf the internet, text message your friends, or engage in any other non­academic activities while in class.You do not have to come to class if you don’t want to.If you would rather do something else, then do it outside of class.

Also, do not pack up before class is over.

This can be disruptive to both students and instructor.Please maintain this mutual respect among all classmates.Turning in Papers: All papers must be turned in on the due date in class in order to receive credit.If the assignment is not turned in during class on the day it is due, you will not receive credit.If you have a documented illness or emergency, you can e­mail the assignment to me (and bring a hard copy and your documentation with you to the next class), but it must be received by the end of class on the day it is due.Papers must be typed and must be stapled.I will not accept “dog­eared” papers ­ staplers can be purchased at any grocery store.

If you do not have a stapler, there are staplers available for your use in the library, the computer labs, and at most reception areas.385 Assignments that are not stapled will receive an automatic 5 point deduction.All papers will be submitted to to be checked for potential plagiarism.Details will be discussed in the paper assignments handed out during the quarter.There will also be no INCOMPLETES allowed for this course.I reserve the right to award an unspecified number of points to those students who have made a valuable contribution to our class.DO NOT ASK ME IF YOU ARE GETTING CLASS CONTRIBUTION POINTS OR NOT, OR HOW MANY.

I will not decide who, if anyone, will get such points or how many, until I sit down to compute final grades.The awarding or not of such contribution points falls entirely in my discretion and is not subject to discussion or debate.Syllabus Changes: I reserve the right to change or revise this syllabus in any manner I deem necessary.Should I find it necessary to do so, I will notify you of changes or revisions.

Academic misconduct will not be tolerated.All cases of suspected academic misconduct will be referred to the University Committee on Academic Misconduct for investigation.Please refer to the University’s Student Code of Conduct for further clarification of academic misconduct, and to the section below, specifically about plagiarism.ABOUT PLAGIARISM Plagiarism is a form of academic misconduct that is sometimes not fully understood by students, and therefore it may be helpful to give separate attention to it.

From OSU’s Code of Student Conduct: “Plagiarism is the representation of another's work or ideas as one's own; it includes the unacknowledged word-for-word use and/or paraphrasing of another person's work, and/or the inappropriate unacknowledged use of another person's ideas” In other words, plagiarism is the act of stealing the ideas and/or the expression of ideas of another and representing them as your own.The most obvious form of plagiarism is copying someone else's work word­for­word, in whole or in part, without acknowledgment, whether that work is a magazine article, a portion of a book, a website on the internet, a newspaper piece, another student's essay, or any other composition not your own.Changing a few words of another's composition, omitting a few sentences, or changing word order or sentence structure does not constitute original composition and, therefore, is plagiarism.All aspects of plagiarism and academic misconduct apply equally to all computer usage.The University regards plagiarism as a very serious matter and deals with it appropriately.

The penalties for plagiarism and other forms of academic misconduct are heavy and severe.All cases of plagiarism are turned over to the University Committee on Academic Misconduct to be investigated and, in cases where violation of the Code of Student Conduct is established, a penalty is imposed which may range from recommending an "E" in the course to dismissal from the University.Unpaid Fees: 386 Faculty rules specify that students are to have their fees paid by the first day of enrollment for the quarter.If you have not paid your fees, you will not be allowed to continue attending class until: 1.

you have a signed letter from Financial Aid stating that you are working with them to get your fees paid.Tentative Course Schedule All dates are tentative; we may move more quickly or more slowly depending on class circumstances, and these dates are subject to change.Date Topic WED 9/19 Intro to Course MON 9/24 WED 9/26 The Nature of Technology The Nature of Technology (continued) Read: MON 10/1 Pacey, “Technology: Practice and Culture” The Differential Effects of Technological Change Read: Pacey, “Women and Wider Values” Dyer, “Making ‘White’ People White” WED 10/3 discussion of Pacey & Dyer MON 10/8 The Sources of Technological Change Read: Bijker, “The Social Construction of the Safety Bicycle” WED 10/10 Scientific Knowledge and Technological Advance MON 10/15 The Diffusion of Technology Read: Read: Rogers, “Consequences of Innovation” Healy, “The Unanticipated Consequences of Technology” WED 10/17 discussion of Rogers & Healy MON 10/22 WED 10/24 MIDTERM EXAM Technology and the Printed Word 387 MON 10/29 WED 10/31 Electronic Media discussion of ethical issues relating to technology **** Ethics assignment due 10/31**** Read: McGuinn, “Ethics” Alcorn, “The Relationship Between Ethics and Technology” McLean, “Ethical Issues in Genetically Modified Foods” MON 11/5 WED 11/7 Technology, Energy & The Environment discussion of Spar’s book **** Paper on Spar due 11/7*** MON 11/12 WED 11/14 NO CLASS – VETERANS DAY Organizations and Technological Change MON 11/19 WED 11/21 Technology, Work and Employment Technological Change and the Workplace MON 11/26 Technology and Its Creators: Who Controls Whom? WED 11/28 discussion of His and Hers: Gender, Consumption, and Technology **** Paper on Gender & Technology due 11/28*** FINAL EXAM: Wednesday Dec 5, 11:30­1:18 STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES 388 Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.

The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 292 -3307, TDD 292-0901 Karen Ehrhardt-Martinez Sociology 460 Environmental Sociology Autumn Quarter 2005 Tuesday and Thursday 1:30 – 3:18 Office Hours Tues 3:30-5:00 or Thurs.11:00-12:00 or By Appointment E-mail: email protected Office 363B Journalism Building Office Phone: 292-6681 I.The Global Casino: An Introduction to Environmental Issues.Schnaiberg, Allan and Gould, Kenneth Alan.

Society and the Environment: The Enduring Conflict.Breakfast of Biodiversity: The Truth about Rainforest Destruction .The Institute for Food and Development Policy.ISBN: 093502896X 389 Princen, Thomas, Maniates, Michael, and Ken Conca.

Course Description: This course examines current environmental issues from a sociological perspective.We will map out three paradigms for understanding the relationship between environment and society: conservative, liberal, and radical.

Through each of these lenses we will explore the human causes of environmental change associated with production, consumption, population, technology, globalization and affluence.Some of the questions that the course addresses are: Must economic growth destroy the environment? Will a reduction in our individual consumption patterns improve the environment? Does population growth lead to environmental problems? Can technical “fixes” solve environmental problems? We will also analyze human responses to environmental change such as international environmental treaties, “green” capitalism, and environmental movements.Course Objectives: To develop a foundation of knowledge and understanding about the social causes of environmental degradation and the human responses and mechanisms of social change.To learn some theoretically-based approaches that “frame” discussions about the relationship between society and the environment.

To improve your knowledge of existence and extent of some contemporary environmental problems.To enhance your sociological imagination: your ability to question past and present characteristics of society and their causes and to conceptualize alternatives.To improve your ability to write critical assessments based on comprehensive evaluations of materials presented.To enhance your research and presentation skills.Active learning both in and outside of class is critical to understanding the course material.Each student brings with him/her a unique set of experiences that can enrich the learning experiences of the entire class and in conjunction with other shared experiences create a greater understanding of the issues at hand.All students are encouraged to ask questions during class lectures and will also have the opportunity to discuss various issues in formal and informal group and class discussions.Successful participation requires preparation on the part of each student including reading all assigned material before class.You should read the material critically.

You are encouraged to take notes while reading and bring any questions to the following class session or meet with me during office hours.Class participation includes: 1) attending class regularly, 2) critically reading all assigned materials on the assigned dates, 3) contributing thoughtful comments to class discussions, 4) participating in group activities, 5) thoughtfully listening to what others have to say.Students are expected to prepare type-written notes for use in each of the discussion panels.Discussion Notes are a place for you to record important information from the assigned reading as well as your reflections on what you have read.(See below) Discussion notes will be collected from all students at the beginning of the class period in which the discussion is scheduled.As such, students should bring two copies of their notes to class: one for him/herself and one for the instructor.391 Discussion notes will contribute to your final course grade.

Discussion notes will not be accepted in the case of an unexcused absence.If you do not attend class for the scheduled panel discussion you will receive a grade of zero for the discussion notes whether or not they have been written up.Discussion Notes for Panel Participants After reading all of the assigned readings: 1.Answer the panel discussion question in a 3-4 page statement, using information from the assigned readings as the basis of your discussion.

Use parenthetical citations in the text of your paper to indicate the source and page number of the ideas borrowed from the assigned readings.(For example, Middleton 2003: 34) Begin your statement with a summary of the ideas presented in all of the assigned readings and then state your informed position on the issue.Once you have stated your position, provide at least three arguments (and evidence) in support of your position.You must also identify what you consider to be the strongest evidence/arguments that might be used to oppose your position and provide a response to those arguments.Your statement may also include a discussion of weaknesses or flaws in the arguments made in the readings and/or identify important ideas/issues that were left unaddressed.

As stated earlier, your statement must draw on course readings but you are also encouraged to identify other sources of useful and credible information.Complete bibliographic information for non-course readings must be provided through a bibliographic entry at the end of your paper or in a footnote.Your notes will be graded on the degree to which they reflect the scope of ideas presented in the assigned readings as well as the thoroughness of your statement.Be prepared to present your position and lead a small group discussion of the issue in class.

These will be informal presentations in which you will be required to present the “what” and “why” of your position.In other words, you need to be able to communicate where you stand on the issue and defend that position.You will also need to be able to intelligently discuss the assigned readings as they relate to the panel discussion question.As such, you need to be familiar with all of the assigned readings and are encouraged to take notes and bring them with you to class.Discussion Notes for non-Panel Participants After reading the assigned readings: o In a 2-3 paragraph statement briefly summarize your informed position on the issue drawing from the ideas presented in the assigned readings.Use parenthetical citations in the text of your paper to indicate the author and page number of the ideas borrowed from the assigned readings.(For example, Middleton 2003: 34) o Develop and state four discussion comments or questions based on your reflections from the readings.Such questions might include a request for panel participants to respond to a real or hypothetical situation related to 393 the issue at hand, the panel’s interpretation of a particular point from the readings, or the panel’s defense of a particular position.Unexcused absences will weigh heavily in determining your final grade.Students with more than four unexcused absences will receive a failing grade for the class.

Students on university athletic teams, musical groups, etc.that must be absent from campus and class should see me immediately to make arrangements for scheduled absences.Please provide practice or game schedules as soon as possible with the appropriate documentation from the coach or supervisor.All assignments are due at the beginning of class on the date listed in the syllabus.include NO plastic or paper covers, folders, etc.Use the citation format explained in the attachment to the syllabus.Environment and Society Research Paper D.Written assignments are due at the beginning of the class period.Any assignments turned in after the start of class will be considered late.

Late assignments will be marked down a full letter grade for each calendar day late.The final course grade is determined on a point system in which the score for all assignment grades are added together and then divided by the total points possible.

Assignments that are not turned in receive a score of zero points.Point Distribution: Assignment Assignment 1: Debate Assignment 2: Research Paper Midterm Final Examination Discussion Notes (1 @ 100 and 3 @ 50) Points 250 250 200 250 250 395 Percentage Homework Class Participation and Attendance Total 200 150 1550 C.You must complete the debate, the research paper, the midterm and final exam in order to receive a passing grade in the class.Class Behavior and Ground Rules: a) Treat other students equally.b) Respect their space as you would like your own respected.Names and Telephone Numbers of Classmates (people you can call if you miss a class or want to study together) Name Phone e-mail Name Phone e-mail X.

Helpful Hints on How to Study, Take Notes, and Do Well in Class A.Read the assigned material before class.If necessary re-read difficult subjects and/or take notes on reading material.

Use the Outlines provided in class as a guide.

Come prepared - having read and digested the material makes it easier to follow in class.Review your notes after each class to be sure they are clear.Come prepared - having read and digested the material 3.

Student Services I am willing to discuss student concerns and progress during office hours or individual 396 appointments, and will make every effort to assist students who are experiencing difficulty in this course.In addition there are several other options available on campus for students who need extra assistance, and you are encouraged to take advantage of these services: Counseling Center 4th Floor Younkin Success Center.292-5766 Learning Center 250 Younkin Success Center 1640 Neil Ave.688-3967 Writing Center 485 Mendenhall Lab 125 South Oval Mall 688-4291 In addition to these services, information about the Department of Sociology is available on the worldwide web.

The address for our web page is: / SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS: Students should contact the Office of Disabilities in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue (292-3307; TDD 2920901; /) in regard to any special arrangements for this course.Students with documented disabilities are responsible for making their needs known to the instructor and seeking available assistance in a timely manner.This syllabus is available in alternative formats on request from the Sociology Advising Office in 304 Bricker Hall (292-9416).Course Time Table and Assignments WEEK 1 DATES READING—CLASS PLAN Introductions and Reflections on the Environment RES 1) Brower, David.

“Seeing and Remembering” Chapter 1 in Let the Mountains talk, Let the Rivers Run.Gabriola Island BC, Canada: New Society Publishers.“Introduction” in Earth in Balance: Ecology and the Human Spirit.“Environmental Problems” in The Environment and Society Reader.Social Theory and the Environment SARES Humphrey, Craig; Lewis, Tammy; and Frederick H.” Chapter 2 in Environment, Energy, and Society: A New Synthesis.Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thompson Learning.Panel Discussion: Why analyze the environment from a sociological perspective? Which paradigm that Humphrey et al.outline (conservative, liberal/managerial, or radical do you find most convincing? Why? Which least convincing? Why? SARES Sunderlin, William.

Chapters 1-3 Ch 1 “Ideology, Social Theory, and Paradigms” Ch 2 “Human Evolution and Socioenvironmental Outcomes” Ch 3 “Ideology and the Environment: From Paradigm Isolation to Paradigm Integration” In Ideology, Social Theory and the Environment.New York, NY: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.Panel Discussion: What are some important differences between Sunderlin’s ideas and those presented by Humphrey et al.? What are ideologies and what role do they play in shaping social behavior? How are “conventional” variables (population, affluence, technology) used to explain environmental outcomes? How do social theory variables (class, power, culture) expand/improve upon “conventional” explanations? 3 Environmental Issues: Production, Urban Environments, and Technological Hazards Urban Environments and Waste: Middleton, Chapters 10 and 17 Energy Production and Transport: Middleton, Chapters 18 and 16 4 The Treadmill of Production Schnaiberg and Gould, Chapters 1 and 2 Environmental Disorganization: Population, Consumption and Technology Schnaiberg and Gould: Chapters 3-5 5 Environmental Issues: Globalization, Deforestation and Biodiversity Loss 398 Deforestation and Biodiversity Loss: Middlteton, Chapters 4 and 15 Globalization and the World System: Vandermeer and Perfecto, Chapters 1-3 Panel Discussion: What is the cause of tropical deforestation in Costa Rica? Who is responsible? To what degree are rainforests resilient? Why do farmers seek to farm rainforest land? What methods do they use? What problems do the encounter? 6 Vandermeer and Perfecto, Chapters 4-5 Panel Discussion: What is “modern” agriculture and how did it come about? To what degree can the structure of the world system and the dependency of less developed countries be blamed for rainforest destruction and biodiversity loss? Vandermeer and Perfecto, Chapters 6-8 Panel Discussion: What is the effect of logging on tropical rainforests? To what degree do reforestation efforts address environmental concerns? What role does social inequality play in rainforest destruction? What are the different types of agricultural systems and which is better for preserving biodiversity? 7 Environmental Issues: Economic Growth, Affluence, and Sustainable Development Food Production, Soil Erosion and Desertification: Middleton, Chapters 13, 14 and 5 The Political Economy of Consumption: Princen, Maniates, and Conca, Part 1 8 Distancing and Commodity Chains: Princen, Maniates, and Conca, Part 2 Environmentalism as a Movement for Change: The Grassroots of a Green Revolution Public Opinion on the Environment: Guber, Introduction and Chapters 1 and 2 9 Voting on Environmental Issues: Guber, Chapters 6 and 7 Social Movements and Individual Actions: Schnaiberg and Gould, Chapters 6 and 7 10 Varieties of Citizen Action: Princen, Maniates, and Conca, Part 3 Student Research Presentations Final Exam 399 Soc 597.

02 World Population Problems Autumn 2007 Lecture: Monday and Wednesday, 9:30-11:18, Journalism JR 0304 Professor: Zhenchao Qian.My office hours are 12:30 to 1:30 on Monday and Wednesday, or by appointment.My telephone number is 688-8612, and my email is email protected Web: /zcq/.To access the course website, enter your OSU username and password.Check this site regularly for course updates.Objectives: This is an introductory course to the study of human population.The objective is to help you think about some of the social problems in the U.

and around the world from a demographic perspective.We will focus on changes in the processes of mortality, fertility, and migration and how these processes shape the compositions of the U.We will pay special attention to the population divide between the developed and developing countries.

We will also examine how processes and compositions are related to social and economic developments.This course fulfills the GEC Issues of the Contemporary World requirement.This course addresses world population issues that will help students understand political, economic, cultural, and social differences among the nations of the world, including a specific examination of non-Western culture.Required Readings: Book (Available at the University Bookstore) Massimo Livi-Bacci.(MLB) Articles (Available at the Carmen Course website) Haub, Carl and O.“India’s Population Reality: Reconciling Change and Tradition.” Population Bulletin 61 (3) (Haub) Himes, Christine L.“Global Aging: The Challenge of Success.

(Kinsella) Kohler, Hans-Peter, Francesco C.“Low Fertility in Europe: Causes, Implications, and Policy Options.

), The Baby Bust: Who Will Do the Work? Who Will Pay the Taxes? Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.Marriage and Family in a Multiracial Society, Edited by R.New York and Washington DC: Russell Sage Foundation and Population Reference Bureau.

(Lichter) Martin, Philip and Elizabeth Midgley.2006 “Immigration: Shaping and Reshaping America.” Population Bulletin 61(4)(Martin) McFalls, Joseph A.“China's Population: New Trends and Challenges,” Population Bulletin 59 (2).(Riley) Yaukey, David and Douglas Anderton.271-312), in 400 Demography: The Study of Human Populations, 2nd Edition.(Yaukey) Requirements: You must attend class regularly.Lectures often cover materials not included in the course readings.In-class exercises or quizzes are given regularly to test how well you have followed the reading assignments and lectures.

Discussion, questions, and comments are both encouraged and expected.If you want to make up the credit for missed exercises or quizzes, you must turn in a one-page report based on the reading assignments for the missed class, but a written document is required (officially documented medical or family emergency).Work relating to these projects must be neat, legible and organized.All projects must be typed and double-spaced.

Each project takes about two or three weeks to complete.If you require an extension, please discuss this with me before the date on which the project is due.Projects are time-consuming, don’t expect to do them (well) at the last moment.The exams will consist of multiple choice, short answer, and short essay questions from lectures and readings.Grading: Two exams: 50% In-class exercises, quizzes (drop the lowest two) 20% Projects: 30% Total 100 Grading scale: A = 93-102; A- =90-92; B+ =87-89; B =83-86; B- =80-82; C+ =77-79; C =73-76; C- =70-72; D+ =67-69; D =63-66; D- =60-62; E =<60 Soc 597.02 World Population Problems 3 Schedules: I shall try to adhere to the following schedule.

All readings should be done prior to the date of the class for which they are assigned.The exception is the reading for September 21.Please do the reading for this date and the September 26 class by September 26.Date Topic Reading Project 9/19 Introduction McFalls pp.15-17 9/24 World Population: History MLB: Chapters 1, 2 9/26 World Population: Overview McFalls pp23-29, PB 10/1 Land, Labor and Population MLB: Chapter 3 Project 1 assigned 10/3 Data and Population Measures McFalls: p.

17 (box) and pp 1-12 10/8 Europe and the Developed World MLB: Chapter 4 10/10 Low Fertility Kohler 10/15 Developing Countries MLB: Chapter 5 10/17 China and India Riley and Haub Project 1 due 10/22 Catch up and Review Project 2 assigned 10/24 First Exam 10/29 AIDS Lamptey 10/31 Migration Yaukey, McFalls pp 12-15 11/5 US Immigration Martin Project 2 due 11/7 Age Structure McFalls pp 17, 19-23 Project 3 assigned 11/12 Population Aging Kinsella 11/14 No Class, Veterans’ Day 11/19 Elderly Americans Himes 11/21 Marriage and Family McFalls p.18 (box), Lichter 401 11/26 Population Futures MLB: Chapter 6 11/28 Catch up and Review Project 3 due 12/4 Second Exam (7:30am-9:18am) Soc 597.02 World Population Problems 4 Disability Statement: Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs.The Office for Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue; telephone 2923307, TDD 292-0901; /.Academic Misconduct: It is the responsibility of the Committee on Academic Misconduct to investigate or establish procedures for the investigation of all reported cases of student academic misconduct.

The term “academic misconduct” includes all forms of student academic misconduct wherever committed; illustrated by, but not limited to, cases of plagiarism and dishonest practices in connection with examinations.Instructors shall report all instances of alleged academic misconduct to the committee (Faculty Rule 3335-5-487).For additional information, see the Code of Student Conduct.Unpaid Fees: Faculty rules specify that students are to have their fees paid by the first day of enrollment for the quarter.If you have not paid your fees, you will not be allowed to continue attending class until your fees are paid or you have met with a Sociology Advisor and a Financial Aid Counselor and are working to get your fees paid.Terms offered: Spring 201849 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences AIS677: Hist Of Am Indian Educ Educational philosophies, policies, and practices of native people, European missions, and federal schools.Historic overview of Indian education to early 1900s.

Terms offered: Fall 2017 AIS678: Cntmp Am Indian Ed+Rsrch Contemporary American Indian/Alaskan native education in two parts: (1) the current state of native education and its effectiveness in meeting the needs of native students; (2) current research in the area of American Indian/Alaskan native education and its implications for future research.

Terms offered: Spring 201850 Active Course Catalog AIS679: Amer Indian Higher Educ Development of higher education for American Indians/Alaskan natives from the earliest efforts to contemporary times.Issues and their implications for the education of American Indians in institutions and agencies of higher education.Emphasis on tribally controlled colleges and universities, and the development of American Indian studies programs in higher education institutions.Terms offered: Spring 2017 AIS694: Practicum The practical application, on an individual basis, of previously studied theory and the collection of data for future theoretical interpretation.Terms offered: Spring 201851 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences AIS696F: Literature+Creative Writ The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.

The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.Terms offered: Spring 2018 AIS696J: Tpcs Native Am Lang+Ling The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting examining in depth topics in Native American Languages and Linguistics.The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.Terms offered: Fall 201752 Active Course Catalog AIS697A: College Teaching Methods The practical application of theoretical and student-centered learning within various classroom settings.The class involves an exchange of ideas about theory, goals, values, and ethical concerns for teaching courses concentrating on American Indians and provide training in practical methods, teaching strategies, and action-learning skills in a lecture and seminar format.

The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.Students will begin to accumulate materials for a teaching portfolio.Terms offered: Fall 2017 AIS699: Independent Study Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.Terms offered: Spring 201853 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences AIS900: Research Terms offered: Spring 2018 AIS909: Master's Report Individual study or special project or formal report thereof submitted in lieu of thesis for certain master's degrees.

Terms offered: Spring 201854 Active Course Catalog AIS910: Thesis Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing).Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.Terms offered: Spring 2018 AIS920: Dissertation Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).Terms offered: Spring 201855 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences AIS477: Spec Top Cultural Anth The course, as taught in any one semester, depends on student need and interest, and the research/teaching interests of the participating faculty member.Graduate-level requirements include additional meetings and assignments.

Terms offered: Spring 2017 AIS910: Brit+Am Lit:Rest-19th C A survey of British and American literature from 1660 to the Victorian period, with emphasis on major writers in their literary and historical contexts.Terms offered: Spring 201756 Active Course Catalog ANTH553A: Mesoamerican Archaeology Lecture on Maya archaeology.We will select specific topics in Maya archaeology and discuss them in depth.Students will develop their own research for papers.Graduate-level requirements include an additional research paper.

Terms offered: Fall 2017139 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH555A: Field Archaeology-Lab Techn Archaeological lab techniques involve training students to working with archaeological materials in the field laboratory.The course provides training in artifact identification, cleaning, conservation and analysis that covers a wide range of material categories.Graduate-level requirements include daily notebooks of their experiences and observations in the lab.Must develop and present a research project.Notebooks and research project requires more complex observations and sophisticated analyses and projects.

Terms offered: Summer 2017 ANTH555B: Field Archaeology-Excavation Archaeological field techniques involving experience working with archaeological sites and materials in the field.The course provides training in field techniques, artifact identification, and mapping.Some programs will also offer experience in both survey and excavation.Graduate-level requirements include daily notebooks of their experiences and observations in the lab.Must develop and present a research project.

Notebooks and research project requires more complex observations and sophisticated analyses and projects.Terms offered: Summer 2017140 Active Course Catalog ANTH556B: Old World Prehistory A survey and interpretation of archaeological evidence for human cultural development of the Old World prior to the appearance of anatomically modern humans.Course covers hunting and gathering to the roots of urban society following the Ice Age.Graduate-level requirements include a research paper.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ANTH558: Historical Archaeology Survey of the basic data and methods of research in the material culture of modern history.

The New World from first European contacts to the 20th century.Graduate-level requirements include an additional research paper.Terms offered: Spring 2018141 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH561: Paleoindian Origins Chronological development of Paleo-Indian occupation of the New World in relation to environmental changes of the Quaternary Period; site discoveries, case studies, hypothesis on the peopling of the Americas.Terms offered: Spring 2017142 Active Course Catalog ANTH562: Classical and Controversial This course aims to introduce students to on-going issues and debates central to the study of the classical cultures in the Mediterranean world, that are far from resolved.Instead of focusing on certain periods or certain media, the students will be able to evaluate scholarly arguments on Classical material culture, including but not limited to discussions of style, technological choices, historical and social contexts, archaeological scientific methods, and cultural heritage, to name a few, spanning several millennia from Aegean Bronze Age to Hellenistic times.

Test cases include celebrated but controversial vases, sculptures, mosaics, temples, and metalwork.We will also study how scholarship shifts its focus to different types of controversies, as a result of more general social, political, and economic contexts.Some prior 300-level coursework on History, Anthropology, Classics, Art History, or related discipline is recommended, but not required.Graduate level students will be required to present addition articles within class, as well as produce a longer, more in-depth, Final paper and presentation.

Terms offered: Fall 2017143 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH562A: Archaeological Quan Meth Terms offered: Spring 2018 ANTH564: Arch:Greek Religion & Ritual This class explores the archaeological evidence for ritual and religion in the Greek world from the Neolithic through the Classical periods.

We discuss how to identify various sacred sites and artifacts, and how to interpret evidence we believe may be from a religious context.Graduate-level requirements include presenting summaries of assigned readings; leading discussions on certain topics; writing a more in-depth paper with an additional 1000 words in length compared to the undergraduate papers, and with more bibliographic references required.Terms offered: Spring 2017144 Active Course Catalog ANTH565: Greek Pottery: Craft & Society The development of Greek pottery from the collapse of the Mycenaean empire to the close of the classical period.Special attention to shapes, decoration, function, and artistic and technical skills.Graduate-level requirements include extensive readings and an in-depth paper.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 ANTH568: Human Osteology Human osteology for the archaeologist and biological anthropologist; techniques of in situ and laboratory identification, preservation and measurement.Graduate-level requirements include an additional research paper.Terms offered: Fall 2017145 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH571: Human Cognitive Evolution Human minds seem unlike those of any other animal.But what is it that makes human cognition unique? How and why did these traits evolve? This seminar will explore these questions by evaluating several leading hypotheses regarding human cognitive uniqueness.The first part of the course will explore which aspects of human cognition are shared with other animals, and which may be uniquely derived in our lineage.

For example, are humans the only animals capable of teaching, cumulative culture, language, or mental time travel? The second part of the course will explore evolutionary scenarios that may be responsible for the evolution of uniquely human cognition.For example, what roles did cooperative breeding, living at high population densities, or exploiting novel environments play in the evolution of our species' psychology? The formal requirements of this course are the same for graduate and undergraduate students.However, graduate students are expected to understand and engage with course topics at a deeper level than undergraduates, and to make connections to other areas of biological anthropology, psychological science, and evolutionary biology.Graduate students will be evaluated according to these additional expectations for both in-class presentation and discussion, and in their writing assignments.Terms offered: Spring 2018146 Active Course Catalog ANTH572: Zooarchaeo+Taphonomy:Lab Identification and classification of faunal remains from prehistoric and historic sites; investigation of the circumstances of faunal assemblage formation; introduction to quantitative and qualitative analysis of faunal data.

Course work emphasizes hands-on experience in laboratory methods, analysis exercises and short research paper assignments.Graduate-level requirements include an additional long research paper and/or annotated bibliography.Terms offered: Fall 2017 ANTH573: Semiotics And Language Introduction to semiotics, survey of major figures and trends.Saussure and structuralism, Jakobson and functionalism/poetics, Pierce and pragmaticism.Focus on what these trends tell us about language.

Students' written work will represent students' specific interests.Terms offered: Spring 2018147 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH574: Archaeometry:Art+Archeo Critical survey of scientific methods used in archaeology and art history.Emphasis on the potential and limitations of these techniques for reconstructing human behavior.Graduate-level requirements include one substantial critical review of the literature on some archaeological application of archaeometry.Terms offered: Fall 2017148 Active Course Catalog ANTH575A: Education Of Latina/Os This course will provide an overview of the theories, policies, and practices related to the education of Latinos.

We will focus specifically on the social, cultural, economic, and institutional factors, within and outside the school context, that contribute to Latino students' underachievement, failure, and negative educational outcomes.In addition, transformative practices that promote student achievement, learning, and critical consciousness will be discussed.Readings will cover various issues in education as well as introduce course participants to a broad collection of primarily Latino scholars interested in developing new methods and policies that will improve the educational experiences of Latino students.Graduate-level requirements include more demanding guidelines for essays.Terms offered: Spring 2018149 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH576: Language In Culture Survey of the nature of the interrelationships between language and other cultural phenomena.

Graduate-level requirements include a research paper and a journal-style review of a major monograph.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ANTH577: Greek Architecture A survey of the architecture and architects of Greece from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period including such sites as Mycenae, Pylos, Delphi, Athens and Corinth.Graduate-level requirements include extensive reading and an in-depth paper.Terms offered: Spring 2017150 Active Course Catalog ANTH583: Sociolinguistics Contributions of the ethnography of communication, language variation studies, and conversation/discourse analysis to the interdisciplinary development of sociolinguistics.Terms offered: Spring 2017 ANTH586: Transnational Feminisms The intellectual and political field of "Transnational Feminisms," although almost instantly institutionalized from the moment of its articulation, is still very much a field-in-formation.

There are a lot of ways to articulate its roots and relationships.This course will draw from feminist anthropology, ethnic studies, women's studies, history (particularly subaltern studies and the history of U.Terms offered: Spring 2017151 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH588: Ling Elicitatn+Document This course introduces students to the basic techniques for documentation, analysis and description of a language in the field.

Topics will include (but are not limited to): ethical issues in language documentation, basic recording and transcription techniques, phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic elicitation, narrative and (if possible) discourse documentation.Students will work with a native speaker consultant of an unfamiliar language, both in a group setting and one-on-one.Terms offered: Spring 2017 ANTH590: Women Mid East Society Middle Eastern society viewed from the perspective of women.Examines the extent to which formal definitions of women's nature and roles coincide with women's self-images and activities.Graduate-level requirements include an additional paper.

Terms offered: Fall 2017152 Active Course Catalog ANTH595A: Sp Top Archaeology The course content, as taught in any one semester, depends on student need and interest, and on the research/teaching interests of the participating faculty member.Graduate-level requirements include extra sessions with instructor, additional readings, and a major research paper.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ANTH595B: Spec Top Cultural Anth The course, as taught in any one semester, depends on student need and interest, and the research/teaching interests of the participating faculty member.Graduate-level requirements include additional meetings and assignments.

Terms offered: Spring 2018153 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH595D: Spcl Tops Biologic Anth The course, as taught in any one semester, depends on student need and interest, and the research/teaching interests of the participating faculty member.

Graduate-level requirements include more advanced coursework and a major term paper.Terms offered: Fall 2017 ANTH596B: Spcl Tops Caribbean Stds The Caribbean along with other Spanish and Portuguese territories have been heavily influenced by the English, Dutch and French.This course looks at the settlement of the Caribbean with reference to those processes which frame contemporary society and public issues.Terms offered: Spring 2018154 Active Course Catalog ANTH596D: Paleontol Sediment Geol The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 ANTH596F: Ceramic Analysis The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.Terms offered: Fall 2017155 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH596M: Spcl Tpcs In Arabic Ling The exchange of scholarly information on various topics related to the linguistic situation in the Arab World in particular and the Middle East in general.Scope of work shall consist of critical evaluation- both oral and written- of scholarly books and articles.Graduate-level requirements include teaching demonstration involving one hour of teaching with a prepared lesson plan and a follow-up review and critique of your performance.

Terms offered: Spring 2017 ANTH597A: Global Change Workshop Integrative experience for natural and social science students with focus on local and regional consequences of global change.Terms offered: Spring 2018156 Active Course Catalog ANTH597B: Field Sch:Egyptian Archaeology Archaeological excavation training program that provides an opportunity to engage in all phases of fieldwork.Field techniques include: mapping, remote sensing, trench supervision, and artifact drawing and analysis.Offered on archaeological sites in Egypt or in museums.Terms offered: Fall 2017 ANTH597C: Dendochronology Hands-on, quantitative construction and assessment of dendrochronologies using software of the Dendrochronological Program Library and other computer resources.

Terms offered: Spring 2018157 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH597I: Pract Dendroclimatology An intensive introduction to the practical application of dendrochronology to paleoclimatology.Graduate-level requirements include synthesis and presentation of analytical results.Terms offered: Summer 2017 ANTH597J: Dendroarchaeology An intensive introduction to the practical application of dendrochronology to a selected topic drawn from archaeology, ecology, forest science, or geoscience.Graduate-level requirements include synthesis and presentation of analytical results.Terms offered: Summer 2017158 Active Course Catalog ANTH599: Independent Study Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.

Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ANTH603J: Sustainabilty+Env Policy Over the past twenty years "sustainability" (or "sustainable development") has emerged as a central goal of environmental policy making.Contemporary tools of environmental policy including ecosystem management, adaptive management, and restoration have been displaced by what seems like a clearer goal that captures ends as well as means.Sustainability has moved from the work of scholars and activists to laws and administrative regulations.The language of sustainability has extended to the world of business and commerce.

Terms offered: Spring 2018159 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH604: Pwr+Viol Cntrl Am+Mexico This course examines recent approaches to politics, culture, and power in Central America and southern Mexico from the perspective of sociocultural anthropology and history.Terms offered: Fall 2017 ANTH606: Arch & Descendant Communities This course is designed to train students in interacting with descendant communities while working on archaeological projects.Students will become familiar with different kinds of documents required by law to document relationships between archaeological sites and descendant communities, will give an initial perspective as to how to request information from these communities, and will provide students with opportunities to develop consultation and historic preservation documents in real-life situations.Terms offered: Spring 2018160 Active Course Catalog An overview of early theoretical tools used in anthropological research.Terms offered: Fall 2017 An overview of early theoretical tools used in anthropological research.

Terms offered: Spring 2018161 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH611: Ecological Anthropology A graduate-level overview of the major alternative approaches to ecological anthropology.The topics we will investigate include population, systems, community, political, behavioral, and evolutionary ecology as they have been applied to a range of anthropological questions.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ANTH631: Anthropology+Development The role of anthropology in interdisciplinary projects involving economic development and planned change on the national and international levels.Terms offered: Spring 2017162 Active Course Catalog Surveys the history of archaeological interpretation.Central concepts in archaeological method and theory are presented.

Terms offered: Fall 2017 ANTH637: Archaeol Methodology Terms offered: Spring 2018163 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH675A: Anth And Global Health An intensive overview of the field of global health and anthropologists' contributions to it.Responses to biotechnology, primary health care and child survival, diseases and development; health care utilization patterns; world systems and multinational pharmaceutical industry; health care bureaucracies; interaction between traditional medicine and public health.Terms offered: Fall 2017 ANTH678: Ethnograph Discours Anly This is a methods based class in linguistic anthropology designed: 1) to give students hand-on experience in linguistic analysis at the level of discourse and 2) to interrogate the micro/macro relationship between discourse patterns, ethnography, and sociopolitical context.Terms offered: Fall 2017164 Active Course Catalog ANTH680: Found Linguistic Anth An introductory survey of the major linguistic-anthropological theories and modes on analysis as these have developed over the last century, with a textual focus on original articles.Topics include: language; culture and thought; semiotics; social interaction; verbal art.

Terms offered: Fall 2017 ANTH681: Keywords Linguistic Ant This course probes the critical connections between language and culture through the keywords of culture, community, identify, heteroglossia, power, and ideology and includes the work of influential social theorists such as Mikhail Bakhtin, Michel Foucault, and Pierre Bourdieu.Terms offered: Spring 2017165 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH693: Internship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.Terms offered: Fall 2017 ANTH694: Practicum The practical application, on an individual basis, of previously studied theory and the collection of data for future theoretical interpretation.Terms offered: Spring 2018166 Active Course Catalog ANTH696A: Archaeology The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

Terms offered: Fall 2017 ANTH696B: Cultural Anthropology The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.Terms offered: Spring 2018167 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH696C: Linguistic Anthropology The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 ANTH696D: Biological Anthropology The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.

The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.Terms offered: Spring 2018168 Active Course Catalog ANTH696M: Gender/Sex+Intrnl Migrat The course examines sexuality as the site where multiple concerns about international migration (including social, cultural, political, economic and national) are expressed and contested, in the context of globalization and transnationalism.Terms offered: Fall 2017 ANTH699: Independent Study Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.Terms offered: Spring 2018169 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ANTH900: Research Terms offered: Spring 2018 ANTH909: Master's Report Individual study or special project or formal report thereof submitted in lieu of thesis for certain master's degrees.

Terms offered: Spring 2018170 Active Course Catalog ANTH910: Thesis Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing).Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ANTH920: Dissertation Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).Terms offered: Spring 2018171 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Arabic172 Terms offered: Spring 2018178 Active Course Catalog ARB427B: Clq Moroccan Arabic II This is a continuation of ARB 427A-527A.The focus is on spoken rather than Standard written Arabic, and will target oral/aural skills, speaking and listening.

Knowledge of Arabic orthography is not required, as the text is in phonetic transcription.Terms offered: Summer 2017 ARB496B: Spcl Tpcs Arabic Studies The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.The scope of work shall vary depending on the content of the course.Terms offered: Spring 2018179 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ARB496M: Spcl Tpcs In Arabic Ling The exchange of scholarly information on various topics related to the linguistic situation in the Arab World in particular and the Middle East in general.Scope of work shall consist of critical evaluation- both oral and written- of scholarly books and articles.

Terms offered: Spring 2017 ARB498: Senior Capstone A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies.Terms offered: Spring 2018182 Active Course Catalog ARB507: 4th Year Arabic I This course is aimed at students with solid advanced level language skills.

Building on this foundation, the course is designed to promote the development of superior level proficiency by increasing students' vocabulary, strengthening reading ability, strengthening writing ability, refining and expanding knowledge of sentence structure and the mechanism of the Arabic verb system.Graduate-level requirements include three additional essays (1-2 typed pages each.) Terms offered: Fall 2017 ARB508: 4th-Year Arabic II The course is designed to promote the development of superior level proficiency in all four-language skills by increasing students¿ vocabulary, strengthening the reading abilities, refining and expanding students¿ knowledge of sentence structure and the mechanism of the Arabic verb system.Graduate-level requirements include three additional essays (1-2 typed pages each).Terms offered: Spring 2018183 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ARB526: Intro Arabic Linguistics History and structure of the Arabic language in its various forms.

Graduate-level requirements include a research paper on any phonological, morphological, or syntactic structure of any variety of Arabic.Terms offered: Fall 2017 ARB596B: Spcl Tpcs Arabic Studies The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.The scope of work shall vary depending on the content of the course.Graduate-level requirements include two additional lengthier essay assignments, including two class presentations.Terms offered: Spring 2018184 Active Course Catalog ARB596M: Spcl Tpcs In Arabic Ling The exchange of scholarly information on various topics related to the linguistic situation in the Arab World in particular and the Middle East in general.

Scope of work shall consist of critical evaluation- both oral and written- of scholarly books and articles.Graduate-level requirements include teaching demonstration involving one hour of teaching with a prepared lesson plan and a follow-up review and critique of your performance.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ARB599: Independent Study Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.Terms offered: Spring 2018185 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ARB699: Independent Study Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.

Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ARB426: Dissertation Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).Terms offered: Fall 2017186 Active Course Catalog College of Social & Behavioral Sciences CHS202: Connecting Society & Health To better prepare students for the MCAT, health-related majors (e., Care, Health & Society), and health-related professions, this course introduces students to the sociological study of society and health.

During the semester, students will explore fundamental sociological theories, perspectives, and concepts.Specific topics include doing sociological research, culture, socialization, social interaction and social structure, groups and organizations, deviance, social class and social stratification, race and ethnicity, sex and gender.Students will also connect sociological theories, perspectives, and concepts to health-related outcomes like mental health, physical health, lifestyle, genetics, and mortality risk.Terms offered: Spring 2018 CHS204: Intro to Helping Professions What makes people want to help others? What are the different ways that workers are socialized to care for clients? How do bureaucracies and technologies structure the delivery of care? How do helping professionals understand the meaning of their work and the conditions of those they serve? What are the different career options for individuals interested in caring for others? This survey course provides students an opportunity to explore these and other issues and to learn from representatives of the various helping professions.Terms offered: Spring 2018188 Active Course Catalog CHS303: Health and Society Organization of health care in the U.

; its impact on patients and society; health care practitioners; medical industries; policy debates.Terms offered: Spring 2018 CHS305: Suffer+Care In Society How societies interpret the reality of human suffering; the organization and politics of care; the status and experiences of individuals whose work involves caring for others.Terms offered: Spring 2018189 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences CHS306: Interprofessional Care This course prepares students who are pursuing a career in the helping professions to work as members of interdisciplinary teams.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 Terms offered: Spring 2018190 Active Course Catalog CHS350: Environment, Health, & Society This course examines the relationships between human health and the environment from a sociological viewpoint.

Using an interdisciplinary sociological perspective, we will explore the increasing number of illnesses linked to environmental contamination and disasters.Since this is a course in the social sciences, only a basic understanding of the biological and chemical nature of environmental pollution will be needed.Our focus will be on the socioeconomic production of environmental health risks and how science and public policy are contested by various stakeholders.Terms offered: Spring 2018 CHS393: Internship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.Terms offered: Spring 2018191 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences CHS394: Practicum The practical application, on an individual basis, of previously studied theory and the collection of data for future theoretical interpretation.

Terms offered: Fall 2017 CHS401: Health Disparities in Society This course introduces students to the sociological study of health disparities.The purpose of the course is to examine the link between social position and health patterns in the US population.Specific topics include, for example, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, aging, family, and religious involvement.Terms offered: Spring 2018192 Active Course Catalog CHS406: Reproduction and Society Reproductive health and well-being involve a responsible, safe and satisfying sex life, the capability to reproduce, and the freedom to control one's reproductive capabilities.This implies access to safe, effective, and affordable methods of fertility regulation and appropriate health care services that enable women to safely experience pregnancy and childbirth.

In this course, we examine the social context of various reproductive health issues, including pregnancy, childbirth, and motherhood, reproductive rights, and traditional and alternative ways of creating families.We will also address the social and political implications of reproductive health practices like abortion, social freezing, surrogate motherhood, and determinants of poor reproductive health outcomes, including violence towards women, sexually transmitted diseases, and social, environmental, and behavioral hazards.Terms offered: Spring 2018193 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences CHS426: Health Care Fraud & Compliance This class will look at the devastating effects that healthcare fraud has on the financial resources of the United States.We will review cases of healthcare fraud that involved more than just money - the ultimate price - human lives.As of 2015, the government has collected and returned over $29.

This does not take into account repayment to the Medicaid fund or other commercial payers.In 2017, the USA has budgeted 28% of the federal budget for healthcare.This amount is highest of all the other categories including defense (21%) and pensions (Social Security 25%.) We will review healthcare fraudulent schemes and methods to detect these schemes.

Who are the perpetrators? Who are the victims? Methods of investigation will be explored to look at how to prevent fraud with current laws, task forces and compliance efforts.Whistleblowers will be discussed regarding their efforts to stop healthcare fraud and the risks they took to come forward.The class will also examine the many free resources available to the public on the topic of healthcare fraud.Students will have a chance to investigate possible career paths related to fighting healthcare fraud.Terms offered: Spring 2018194 Active Course Catalog CHS460: Self-Care - Helping Profession The emotional, physical and spiritual demands of the caring and health professions are significant.

Students are introduced to the importance of wellness and self-care practices as they consider careers in the helping professions.This course will explore the impact of cultivating compassion vs.empathy in working with clients/patients, as well as offer students an opportunity to cultivate a wellness/self-care practice in their own lives.The course culminates in a research paper on the student's selected wellness/self-care practice.Terms offered: Spring 2018 CHS476: Rsch & Analysis of Health Data This course introduces students to the quantitative analysis of health disparity data.

Specific topics include data processing, data description, bivariate analysis, and multivariate analyses.The course emphasizes reading, conducting, and interpreting quantitative research.Terms offered: Fall 2017195 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences CHS496: Special Topics This course is designed to provide a flexible topics seminar for undergraduates across several domains within Care, Health and Society.Students will develop and exchange scholarly and/or applied information in a small group setting.The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.

Potential topic areas include: delivery of care; health disparities; health care inequality; gender; globalization; law and society; organizations; poverty; race and ethnicity; social networks; social psychology; and stratification.Terms offered: Spring 2017 CHS498H: Honors Thesis An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors.Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence.

Speech language pathology services credential program fresno state

The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.Terms offered: Fall 2017196 Active Course Catalog DVP600: Foundations of Development This intensive pre-program course will be taught over a three-week period prior to the start of fall semester, when each new cohort is convened.

It is designed to create a shared basic understanding of development for students with different academic and practitioner backgrounds and presents the context of development as a historical process, weaving in the major theories, concepts, and practice strategies that have defined its particular trajectory self study program review 2016 17 The University of Tennessee at nbsp.It is designed to create a shared basic understanding of development for students with different academic and practitioner backgrounds and presents the context of development as a historical process, weaving in the major theories, concepts, and practice strategies that have defined its particular trajectory.

Terms offered: Fall 2017 DVP601: Prin of Social Science for Dev This course will introduce students to key social science analytical tools relevant to development.It provides training in major development theories and practices through a social justice and rights-based lens and prepares students to understand how relations of power at local and global scales intersect with and shape development efforts.Terms offered: Fall 2017232 Active Course Catalog DVP602: Culture in Sustain Development This course emphasizes the cultural and spatial dimensions to development practice and promotes sensitivity to the unique development practice challenges related to language and culture.Students are exposed to a range of regional contexts and are expected to expand their knowledge and understanding of a specific cultural area jreference.com/essay/human-rights.php.

Students are exposed to a range of regional contexts and are expected to expand their knowledge and understanding of a specific cultural area.

The specific regional themes focus on the impacts of culture on problems related to health and nutrition, natural resource management, governance, and economic decision-making, among other.Faculty from different core competency disciplines will participate in this course.Terms offered: Spring 2018233 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences DVP620: Intro to Natural Systems This course presents the basic concept and principles of ecosystem analysis, the services those ecosystems provide, and the impacts of human-environment interactions.Instructional units will provide a clear understanding of the ecology and management of arid and semi-arid lands, rangelands, and forests.

The importance to development of hydrologic resources (water availability and quality) in all of these environments will be explored with specific emphasis on the concepts of ecohydrology and watershed management.

These units will be followed by instruction in the current concepts and practices in wildlife and fisheries conservation and management and will emphasize the importance of the biotic resources of ecosystems.Terms offered: Fall 2017234 Active Course Catalog DVP630: Essential Mgmt Principles This course introduces participants to the structure of development delivery services and the management skills that these delivery systems utilize.It first focuses on the organizational and operational characteristics of the principal development actors (bilateral and multilateral donors, international NGOs, local NGOs, national government agencies, foundations, etc.); then analyzes the sequential steps of the delivery process, including strategic planning, assessment, problem analysis / theory of change, project design, monitoring and evaluation, project administration, proposal development and policy analysis.This course will be administered by a combination of TANGO International Executive Officers and qualified guest lecturers with expertise in relevant fields.

Terms offered: Spring 2018235 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences DVP631: Research & Data Analysis Tools Building on the introductory methods course, this course reinforces the basic qualitative and qualitative tool set, including rapid appraisal, participatory appraisal, formal surveys, team ethnography, and so forth.The course further introduces the use of GIS, remote sensing, and other techniques into development problem solving (e.This course also focuses on the skills needed for the management and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data using standard software packages, as well as the professional interpretation and presentation of findings.

Students will apply these techniques to data collected during the previous summer field practicum, in this way integrating the applied field experience into the classroom.Student teams research projects, in collaboration with community partners.Terms offered: Spring 2018236 Active Course Catalog DVP640: Methods Development Practice This course introduces students to the "culture of inquiry", the basic principles of applied, problem-solving research, and the logic of a mixed methods approach.It then relates research methodology to the development context as defined by the project cycle and project design principles, information systems and management, livelihood and vulnerability assessment (including health, nutrition, and environmental assessment), community and participatory planning, project monitoring and evaluation, and proposal development.In providing a comprehensive overview of the role of information in development, the course is designed to build decision skills in the choice of method and the management of information.

Instruction will be provided by faculty and practitioner experts in these fields.Terms offered: Fall 2017237 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences DVP642A: Cross Cohort Workshop The course will co-convene first and second year MDP students.It is designed to promote a collaborative learning environment for both cohorts.First year students will be expected to prepare for an intensive summer field practicum and produce a proposal for their field projects.Second year students will analyze and present the findings of their projects conducted the previous summer and help to orient the first-year cohort in proposal development and field work.

This course will provide a concrete context around which analytical concepts and methodological tools can be evaluated and refined.Terms offered: Spring 2018 DVP694A: Summer Field Practicum A core element of the Arizona MDP program is its field practicum.The purpose of the field practicum is to create a structured opportunity for field-tested learning on a closely mentored individual basis.The practicum experience engages students in an on-going specific development practice activity that utilizes cross-disciplinary skills, provides a concrete methodological experience, and involves collaboration and field interaction with local colleagues.The field practicum will be carried out with one of University of Arizona's long-term institutional partners in one of several countries including Brazil, Ethiopia, and Guatemala, or with the international development group TANGO International Terms offered: Summer 2017238 Active Course Catalog DVP697B: Field Practicum Analysis DVP 697B is part of a collaborative learning environment for both MDP cohorts.

For the first third of the semester we will co-convene with DVP 642A.Those first-year graduate students will be expected to prepare for an intensive summer field practicum and produce a proposal for their field projects.DVP 697B, the second-year cohort, will utilize their own prior field experience to assist the first-year cohort in proposal development and field work.Additionally, DVP697B students will analyze the data and present the findings from their own field practicums.Lastly, DVP 697B emphasizes professional development.

Each student will do guided preparation of a personal professional website, social media sites, a blog, and entry into a customized professional network.There will also be sessions on fundamentals of grant-writing and presentation skills.Terms offered: Fall 2017239 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences DVP699: Independent Study Qualified Development Practice students will work on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.Terms offered: Spring 2018240 Active Course Catalog DVP909: The MDP Culmination Project The Field Practicum will culminate with a Master's Project.In collaboration with field-partners and faculty advisors, students will develop a report on the field research objectives, methods, and outcomes.

The Master's project will be refined in the cross-cohort seminar and presented to program faculty and first year students in class as part of the seminar requirements.Additionally, it is anticipated that the Master's Report will reflect each student's chosen second-year specialization within MDP.The project will be presented formally at the annual University of Arizona MDP Forum, involving faculty and leading representatives of the international development community and the MDP network.Student papers will contribute to the MDP Discussion Paper Series, available online as a forum for collaboration among students and faculty engaged in the MDP network and the broader international development community.Terms offered: Spring 2018241 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Economics242 ECON150C1: An Economic Perspective The study of the interactions of individuals and societies from the viewpoint of economics.

The Course examines a series of important social problems that lie on the intersections of economics and disciplines such as law, history, anthropology, political science, psychology, and so forth.Terms offered: Spring 2018 Terms offered: Spring 2018377 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ENGL693A: Applied Esl Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ENGL696D: History of Rhetoric The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.Terms offered: Spring 2018378 Active Course Catalog ENGL696E: Studies in Rhetoric+Comp The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.

The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ENGL696F: Literature+Creative Writ The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.Terms offered: Spring 2018379 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ENGL696G: Queer Theories This seminar examines theories of sexuality, focusing on relations between sexuality, gender, race, and economic processes.

The course may include foundational theorists such as Foucault, Butler, and Sedgwick as well as the most recent publications in the field.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 ENGL696M: Gender/Sex+Intrnl Migrat The course examines sexuality as the site where multiple concerns about international migration (including social, cultural, political, economic and national) are expressed and contested, in the context of globalization and transnationalism.Terms offered: Fall 2017380 Active Course Catalog ENGL696S: Hist Stds Rhetoric+Comp Courses offered under this number may have a thematic focus that ranges across traditional periods and cultural boundaries, or a course may focus on the historical development of particular groups or movements.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ENGL909: Master's Report Individual study or special project or formal report thereof submitted in lieu of thesis for certain master's degrees.Terms offered: Spring 2018381 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ENGL910: Thesis Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing).Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.

Terms offered: Summer 2017 ENGL920: Dissertation Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).Terms offered: Spring 2018382 Active Course Catalog ENGL486: Civil War+Reconstruction Political, constitutional, economic, and military developments in the U.and the Confederacy during and after the Civil War.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ENGL418: Law of the Press Basic legal concepts for print, broadcast, online, and photojournalism, including access to courts, public records and meetings; subpoenas and shield laws; prior restraint; libel; privacy; source confidentiality; intellectual property; obscenity; and FCC regulations.

Terms offered: Fall 2017383 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences eSociety384 ESOC150B1: Social Media and Ourselves This course is designed as a gateway to understanding how social media sites influence and are impacted by our selves, as well as the role of social media in our relationships.This course with its focus on social media sites in particular, will examine the various implications and functions of social media in contemporary times.The study of new media takes place across disciplinary divides and from multiple theoretical perspectives.This course will thus explore social media research from across academic traditions.With a focus on both theory and practical applications, this course gives learners opportunities to think intellectually about how mobile technologies and being online impacts daily living, personal health, individual success, and interpersonal relationships.

Terms offered: Spring 2018385 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ESOC210: Hacking & Open Source Culture This course examines the popular image of hackers and hacking by considering the larger cultural context of information sharing in the digital age.This course introduces students to theories and practices of information sharing including the public domain, information as a common public good, hacking, copy left, open source software, open access publishing, and the creative commons.Terms offered: Spring 2018386 Active Course Catalog ESOC211: Collaborating: Online Commun With the increasing reliance on new media for collaborative work, social connection, education, and health-related support, this course will analyze human collaboration and community processes online.By considering how people create a sense of community, maintain group connections, and cooperate with others to bring about a particular outcome, this class will focus on what humans do, how they present themselves, and how they do the work of collaboration in online contexts.In addition to focusing on how humans work together in online in communities, this course will examine the many theories and interdisciplinary bodies of literature that pertain to `community¿ generally, and `online communities¿ specifically.

With a focus on both theory and practical applications, this course gives learners opportunities to think intellectually about technology-based collaborations and to apply course-based knowledge in their mediated social lives.This course is not a technical experience, rather it focuses on the theories pertaining to and the processes in play when humans engage in group collaborations (e., gaming, teaching, learning, working, or gaining health-related support) via mobile technologies and online sites.Terms offered: Spring 2018387 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ESOC212: Social Media Strategies This course offers a broad survey of contemporary thinking about social media and examines mediated practices across sectors such as health care, education, government, museums, tourism, and business.

Students will be exposed to a range of applicable theories, will be introduced to contemporary notions of information behavior (i., seeking, using, and negotiating information), will consider the historical evolution of new media environments, and will become familiar with information and social media literatures.In focusing on how people share social and practical information online, this course will examine how people aim to bring about particular outcomes via social media.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ESOC213: The Past and New Media This course explores the emergence of contemporary visual culture and technological changes over time as well as how these shifts have and continue to impact human events, societal eras, and the `telling' of human stories.

Specifically, this course offers an introduction into thinking critically about past events and related interpretations, handling archival materials, and visualizing human activity over time with new media technologies.Terms offered: Spring 2018388 Active Course Catalog ESOC214: Intro to Data Science As data continue to grow in volume and penetrate everything we do in contemporary work across many professions, employers are seeking data scientists to extract meanings and patterns from large quantities of data.This user-friendly course will provide an introduction to a variety of skills required for data analytics in organizations, education, health contexts, and the sciences.Specifically, this course examines information management in the context of massive sets of data, provides students proficiency with a variety of data analysis tools, and exposes learners to varied data platforms as well as skills and concepts related to data mining and statistical analysis.

Particular attention will be given to toolkits imbedded in R and other platforms.Terms offered: Spring 2018389 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ESOC300: Digital Storytelling & Culture This course will lay a foundation for understanding how stories shape communities, identities, memories, and perspectives on our lives.In addition, this course will provide opportunities for the theoretical analysis of self representation, composite narratives on behalf of others, cultural heritage, and memories as they are preserved and performed within stories and through narrative.Influences on digital digital storytelling such as the sociocultural context, the institutional contexts of production the audience, and the needs or goals of the digital storyteller will be examined.Students will be required to call on their own intellectual, emotional, and imaginative processes, as well as to develop their own skills in digital storytelling, interviewing, oral history collection, and the use of relevant digital storytelling tools.

Terms offered: Spring 2018390 Active Course Catalog ESOC301: Qualitative Internet Research This course will lay a foundation for understanding how to design and conduct qualitative research in the digital age.This course will focus on such practices as digital ethnography, online discourse or text analysis, web-based survey research, virtual interviewing, and data collection via mobile technologies.Broad paradigmatic assumptions underpinning interpretive inquiry will also be examined.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ESOC302: Quantitative Methods This course will explore broad research paradigms and theoretical approaches that inform contemporary social research, varying study designs, as well as the systematic methods utilized in differing types of data analyses.Though this course will introduce research processes across the academic spectrum, quantitative analysis of both small and large data sets will be emphasized.

Therefore, students will learn about basic statistical analyses and will be introduced to the emerging worlds of data science and social media analytics.Students will also consider related topics such as data visualization or research presentations.Terms offered: Spring 2018391 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ESOC313: Digital Discourse and Identity The focus of this course is on how social information is produced though language and identity work online, focusing on patterns of talk and interactional rules and practices across contexts (e., text-messaging, online communities, personal identity work, and transnational blogs).

As part of this focused study of talk, this course will explore how online language use can create, maintain, reproduce, or disrupt roles and related norms (e., those of a friend, student, expert, or political agent), as well as identities and social categories (e., gender, sexuality, race, disability, or nationality).

This course will also focus on the broader discourses on a 'global' level, examining human collaboration online for practices tied to elitism, the movement of social capital, racism, power, and the cultural production of inequalities.Terms offered: Spring 2018392 Active Course Catalog ESOC314: Theories of New Media This course will lay a foundation for theoretical analyses of how people socially create and negotiate information in the digital age.In addition, this course investigates a variety of approaches ranging from critical/cultural studies to positivist/behavioral research, considering the differing ways to think about social life and information in contemporary times., feminist theory, systems research) as well as specific theoretical topics (e., interactivity, mobility, telecommunity) will be examined.In addition, this class will survey the theoretical underpinnings of new media research across a variety of topic areas to include gaming, digital labor, communities, and global culture online.Terms offered: Spring 2018393 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ESOC315: Publishing:Papyrus to E-Books In the early 21st Century, we see publishing in the throes of dramatic changes, from print to electronic most obviously but also in who authors books, the economics of publishing, and how books get to readers.

These changes remind us that the dynamics of the movement of the written word to its audience are an integral part of the society in which books are written, produced, and circulate.This 3-credit course takes an historical perspective on publishing, which we will define as the processes by which books come into being in multiple copies and are distributed to reach their audiences.We will start with ancient societies all over the world, and we will investigate the circumstances across societies in which books distinguish themselves from administrative records and begin to serve the needs of the literate elite.We will examine the way the physical form of the book and the technologies for producing it arise from the circumstances of each society, and in turn, how that physical format conditions the character of books and their use.We will trace the rise of publishing practices and identify the factors necessary for the reproduction and distribution of books to form an actual trade in books in varying societies.

As we work our way from the ancient world to the early modern world, we will compare publishing practices in different societies and explore commonalities and differences in the relationships that develop between the creation, reproduction and distribution of books.Of particular focus will be our comparison of the rise of publishing and book trades in Europe, Asia, and the Arab world before 1450.After the introduction of printing with metal moveable type in Europe, associated with Gutenberg in approximately 1450, we will have an opportunity to observe the changes that this new technology makes in publishing and the book trade, by comparing the mature manuscript book trade of the late middle ages to that of the hand-press book publishing of early modern Europe.We will also examine related publishing matters such as art and decorative print production as well as the emergence and social role of pamphlets.

Terms offered: Spring 2018394 Active Course Catalog ESOC316: Digital Commerce This course will look at how commerce in information content (websites, books, databases, music, movies, software, etc.We will discuss things like switching costs, net neutrality, the long tail, differential pricing, and complementary goods.We will address the following sorts of questions: - Why do so many information producers give away content (such as "apps" for mobile phones) for free? How do companies (such as Google and Facebook) stay in business when no one has to pay to use their services? - What are contemporary practices with regard to purchasing access to information content? For instance, why do we tend to buy books, but only rent movies? Also, how do new modes of content provision (such as Pandora and Spotify) change the way that creators get paid for their work? - Why are there restrictions on how information content can be used? For instance, why can you play the DVD that you bought on your trip to Europe on the DVD player that you bought at home in the United States? But why should anybody other than an economist care about the answers to these sorts of questions? The world now runs on the production, dissemination, and consumption of information.All of us constantly access all sorts of information, through all sorts of devices, from all sorts of providers.

We read and interact with websites, we query databases, and we communicate with each other via social media.These sorts of activities permeate both our personal and professional lives.In order to successfully navigate this digital world, information consumers, information producers, and information policy makers need to understand what sorts of information goods are likely to be available and how much they are likely to cost.We cannot learn enough about digital commerce simply by studying the various information technologies that are now available to create and disseminate information content.What matters most is how people choose to spend their time using these technologies, and what sorts of content can provide earning potential for its creators.

What also matters are the unique properties of information content that make it very different from other sorts of goods.For instance, while only one person at a time can drive a particular car or eat a particular hamburger, millions of people can simultaneously read the same book, listen to the same song, and use the same software.These are issues that are part and parcel to living, working, purchasing, and being entertained in an eSociety; these are the issues addressed in this course.Terms offered: Spring 2018395 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ESOC317: Digital Crime & Social Media This course provides a powerful introduction to some of the criminal activities taking place in relation to digital information, big data, and social media.Related to the exploration of criminal activity in an eSociety, this course focuses on some of the most common legal issues faced today, with regard to our own personal data (e.

, our health histories, our genetic make up, our cloud-based photos and messages, our past) and in relation to organizational or political data on social media and in society.In this course, students as future technologists, will be exposed to the 'dark side' of this current 'information society' (e., deception, cybercrime) as well topics such as big data privacy, digital disruptions, consumer data and related sales, gaming protections, youth safety online, big science data sharing issues and related trust, digital security, as well as how certain groups -- law firms, advocacy groups, marketing professionals, and political or lobbying groups -- are mining data for particular use.

Students will be required to consider recent court cases and contentions around the use, management, and protection of data in society as well as the risk humans face in this digital information and mediated age.Terms offered: Spring 2018396 Active Course Catalog ESOC318: Disruptive Technologies This course introduces key concepts and skills needed for those working with information and communication technologies (ICT).Students will be exposed to hardware and software technologies, and they will explore a wide variety of topics including processing and memory systems, diagnostics and repair strategies, operating systems in both desktop and mobile devices.As part of this course, students will consider current technological disruptions, those issues emerging as technologies and social needs collide.

Students we also learn about design issues and user needs tied to mobile or computer applications and web-based tools, sites, games, data platforms, or learning environments.

Terms offered: Spring 2018397 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ESOC330: Digital Dilemmas This course focuses on the ethical issues that arise in the context of new and emerging information technologies-- e., threats to privacy of ubiquitous technological surveillance, limitations on access created by digital rights management.The course will use the framework of ethical theory to analyze these issues and to propose policy solutions.The goal of the course is to give students the necessary theoretical foundation to be involved in the evaluation and construction of information policies at the local, national, and international level.

The course will focus on three core areas where digital dilemmas arise--information access, information privacy, and intellectual property.In order to achieve depth as well as breadth, the course will put one of these issues at the center and discuss the others in relation to it.So, for instance, the course may focus on Intellectual Property looking at the threats and benefits of IP to privacy and access.This syllabus provides an overview of the range of topics that may be discussed.Terms offered: Spring 2018398 Active Course Catalog ESOC400: Info MM Design & Moving Image We are living in a time when nearly everyone has the means to make movies, music and photos using just their own personal tools like smartphones, iPads, and similar mobile gadgets.

This course will develop and refine skills and understanding of multimedia in contemporary culture.Offering a survey of innovative works in film and information arts, this course will allow students a hands-on opportunity to respond to concepts covered in class using self-produced media.This course will address how information functions in time-based forms of multimedia and video in this era of interactive information and displays.How and why do certain images, music or films affect us so profoundly? We will address this question through a study of the components of media literacy that include: Production, Language, Representation, and Audience.

These concepts will be examined through a cross-section of writers including: Marshall McLuhan, John Berger and Susan Sontag.Terms offered: Spring 2018399 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ESOC414: Computational Social Science This course will guide students through advanced applications of computational methods for social science research.Students will be encouraged to consider social problems from across sectors, like health science, education, environmental policy and business.Particular attention will be given to the collection and use of data to study social networks, online communities, electronic commerce and digital marketing.Students will consider the many research designs used in contemporary social research and will learn to think critically about claims of causality, mechanisms, and generalization in big data studies.

Terms offered: Spring 2018400 Active Course Catalog ESOC477: Information Security Security is about protecting assets, such as money and physical possessions.For instance, we use walls, locks, burglar alarms, and even armed guards to keep other people from stealing and/or destroying our stuff.These days, information is typically one of our most important assets.Thus, we have to worry about the possibility of other people stealing and/or destroying it.For instance, criminals threaten our data with scareware or ransomware in order to extort money from us.

Also, they use phishing scams and spyware in order to steal our personal information (including passwords), which they can then use to access our computer systems and even steal our identities.Terms offered: Spring 2018401 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ESOC480: Digital Engagement This course is designed to be a culminating experience for the eSociety degree program, a course that engages students in practical activity as well as prepares learners for contemporary work.eSociety major and minor students as well as other undergraduates preparing for work relating to digital information or related fields can enroll in and will benefit from this course.Students will be given opportunities to discuss, review and reflect on their learning in their undergraduate work relative to an eSociety and will be provided the mechanisms through which their coursework can be applied to `real-world' contexts (e., internships, interviews with leaders in their area of study, professional shadowing experiences, service learning projects, or community-based event planning).Ultimately, this course provides students the opportunity to learn about what it means to be prepared in an eSociety as well as reflect on their own skill sets and the professional preparation needed for career satisfaction and success.Terms offered: Spring 2018402 Active Course Catalog ESOC488: Special Topics Special topics courses are offered to allow students to explore specialized topics not covered in the program curriculum.Multiple topics might be offered in any given year, and specialized topic descriptions will be advertised by the School for students interested in enrolling in the course.Terms offered: Fall 2017403 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Environmental Studies404 EVS260: Envir Stds: Ideas/Institutions This class analyses the key ideas, individuals, and institutions that have shaped environmental studies and policies in the US and globally.

The course provides an introduction to environmental writings that have shaped attitudes to the environment, an overview of the most important US and international institutions that have been established to manage the environment, and the exploration of critical and iconic environmental cases and problems.The course is intended to provide the social science foundations and basic environmental literacy for the degree in environmental studies.Terms offered: Spring 2018 EVS302: Intro to Sustainable Dev Introduction to Sustainable Development is a foundational course in understanding the policies and strategies that constitute "smart" regional development in US metropolitan areas.Terms offered: Spring 2018405 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences EVS304: Water,Environmnt+Society The course explores human and natural systems and their dependence on freshwater at multiple scales.Topics of interest include global change, ecosystem services, groundwater, urbanization, land use, watershed and river basin management, stakeholder processes, and water policy.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 EVS362: Environment and Development This course evaluates theories and practices aimed at addressing the complex relationship between economic development and environmental protection in both industrialized and developing world contexts Terms offered: Spring 2018406 Active Course Catalog EVS368: The Green Economy The Green Economy.What is it and how does it function? What does it mean for our future? What are the implications for cities, community, and globalization? What kind of policies lay the foundation for green economic development, and what challenges and opportunities lie within? And what does 'green' mean anyway? This course is a challenging exploration into the day-to-day practices and policies of the green economy, particularly in the United States and the Southwest.The class will be devoted to understanding how the green economy functions and why, through readings, lectures, visiting speakers, and field studies.Terms offered: Spring 2018 EVS393: Internship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.Terms offered: Spring 2018407 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences EVS404: The Politics Of Nature Surveys political problems in environment/society relations by exploring the history of geographic theory surrounding environmental politics, surveying the local and global actors in conflicts, and addressing questions of biodiversity loss, forest conservation, and urban hazards.

Terms offered: Spring 2018408 Active Course Catalog EVS445: Intl.Environmental Governance Why is it so difficult to solve international environmental problems? What works and doesn¿t work in international environmental policy and governance? What improvements can be made and how can we take positive steps forward? This course seeks to address these very questions from a geographical and social science perspective.We will explore the nature and causes of many high-profile international environmental problems and the solutions developed to address these challenges.We will begin by identifying some key concepts in global environmental politics such as the global commons, sovereignty, and sustainability.

Next, we will explore the geographical origins and consequences of international environmental issues - which countries and groups are most responsible, how the issue relates to the earth's physical and human geography, and who will be most affected.

We will explore the processes of environmental policy development from the identification of problems to the negotiation of solutions, and the implementation of international treaties and agreements.We will look at a variety of cases including water, whaling and marine conservation, fisheries, ozone depletion, toxic waste, transfrontier pollution, deforestation, biodiversity, and climate change, and how these relate to development goals.Finally, students will debate key policy questions in global environmental politics and analyze approaches to development, security, equity, and justice.The focus will be at the global level but we will also examine the interaction between processes in sub-national, national and international arenas and the role of government, business, nongovernmental and international organizations.Terms offered: Spring 2018409 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences EVS462: Env.

Law, Geography & Society This course offers an overview of U.environmental law and policy in historical and geographic context.society used laws to solve environmental problems? We introduce the fundamental elements of the U.legal system and the public policy process, as they affect the natural environment and resources.We study key environmental laws, such as the National Environmental Policy Act and the Clean Air Act, and the political geography, court decisions, and policy issues that have shaped their implementation in practice.In addition to environmental law, we discuss different approaches to environmental economics, political economy, and human-environment relations in order to better understand the wider social and geographic context of environmental regulation.

In the last part of the course we study the evolution of electricity law in relation to changing social and environmental priorities, and these cross-cutting themes lead us to look at international environmental problems of global warming and climate change.Terms offered: Spring 2018410 Active Course Catalog EVS468: Water And Sustainability Social and environmental conflicts over water are intensifying in much of the world.This course studies the physical basis, history, and political economy of water development and water policy in the U.Terms offered: Spring 2018 EVS498: Senior Capstone A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies.Terms offered: Spring 2018411 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Geography & Development412 GEOG150B1: Geography and Global Issues This course introduces students to fundamental issues and concepts pertinent to the study of individuals and societies.In focusing on models and explanations of how things are interrelated in earth space.Students are given a clearer understanding of the economic, social, and political systems with which individuals live and operate.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG150C1: Environment and Society This course introduces students to the study of relationships between people and the environment from a social science perspective, and provides a context for thinking about the social causes and consequences of environmental changes in different parts of the world.It focuses on how and why the human use of the environment has varied over time and space; analyzes different approaches to decision-making about environment issues and examines the relative roles of population growth, energy consumption, technology, culture and institutions in causing and resolving contemporary environmental problems around the world.Terms offered: Spring 2018413 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GEOG170A1: Earth Envr:Intr Phys Geo Introduction to fundamental laws of nature as expressed physical processes that govern the spatial distribution of Earth's land, sea, air, and biological environments.Focus on fluxes and feedbacks among these systems, and interactions with humans.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG205: Places in the Media This course is an introduction to media and geography.

Students will develop critical frames for evaluating how places are represented in media such as television, film, music videos, blogs, and advertisements.Terms offered: Spring 2018414 Active Course Catalog GEOG210: Pol+Cult Geog/Globaliz This course examines how systems of difference provide revealing analytical categories for understanding the political and cultural geography of globalization and develops critical thinking skills that can be used effectively beyond this course.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG220: Our Diverse Biosphere The strategy is to immerse non-science majors in the biological aspects of Physical Geography and, through lively debate and discussion, maps and images, to enhance critical thinking skills students need to make decisions about the world around them.Terms offered: Spring 2018415 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GEOG222: Fundamental Geog.Techniques This class is designed to furnish students with a basic set of skills in recognizing, locating, processing and analyzing geographic data.

These skills provide a foundation for upper-level classes in statistical methods, Geographic Information Systems, urban and regional development.These skills also provide a basic professional preparation for employment market requirements including defining research questions, selecting suitable geographic tools and methods to investigate, harvesting and analyzing data, and in presenting findings using computer mapping, spreadsheet, and charting software.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG230: Our Changing Climate Where, when, and why is climate changing? We will answer these questions via computer visualization and hands-on exploration of satellite images, time-series, and other climate variability data at global, regional, and local scales, and from paleoclimate to modern instrumental record.Terms offered: Winter 2017416 Active Course Catalog GEOG240: Our Dynamic Landscape Critical perspectives on complex environmental problems; issues include environmental hazards, renewable and nonrenewable resources; global, regional, and local patterns, and geographic scale are emphasized.Terms offered: Fall 2017 GEOG251: Wrld Reg:Comp+Glob Persp Survey and comparison of major world regions with a focus on how global processes, regional interconnections, and local geographic conditions create distinctive regions and landscapes.

Terms offered: Spring 2018417 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GEOG252: Global Borders/Migration/Refug This course explores the broad trends shaping global migration, with particular emphasis on the political geographies of borders, population displacement and human rights, and comparative immigration and refugee experiences.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG256: Sustainable Cities+Socs Urbanization and cities within the sustainability framework.Global urbanization, social justice, environmental equity, growth management, "the new urbanism.Terms offered: Spring 2018418 Active Course Catalog GEOG270: Sports Geographies Sports are a central part of landscapes and everyday lives around the world.They reflect and shape individual and national identities, historical and contemporary global political economies, and the places in which we live.This class explores these connections, places, and landscapes through the lenses of geography.Topics include the siting of stadiums and urban development; geographies of identity and nationalism; traditional/indigenous sports; transnational sports and migration; the political economy of megaevents such as the Olympics and World Cup; spaces of race/ethnicity and gender/sexuality; and the landscapes of outdoors sports.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG299H: Honors Independent Study Terms offered: Fall 2017419 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GEOG301: Intro Regional Planning Terms offered: Summer 2017 GEOG302: Intro to Sustainable Dev Introduction to Sustainable Development is a foundational course in understanding the policies and strategies that constitute "smart" regional development in US metropolitan areas.

Terms offered: Spring 2018420 Active Course Catalog GEOG303: Fld Stdy Enviro Geog Methods used in environmental geography, including mapping techniques, use of global positioning systems, collection of various types of environmental data and basic data analysis methods.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG304: Water,Environmnt+Society The course explores human and natural systems and their dependence on freshwater at multiple scales.Topics of interest include global change, ecosystem services, groundwater, urbanization, land use, watershed and river basin management, stakeholder processes, and water policy.Terms offered: Spring 2018421 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GEOG305: Economic Geography Analysis and modeling of the spatial structure of primary, secondary, and tertiary economic activities; location theory and regionalization in economic systems.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG311B: Geog Cntrl Am&Carribean Land, people and politics in Central America and the Caribbean.

Major themes include colonialism, race and national identity, development, revolution and counterrevolution, globalization and migration.Terms offered: Fall 2017422 Active Course Catalog GEOG311E: Geography of Middle East Physical environments and cultural areas of Southwest Asia, with emphasis on people-environment interrelationships, settlement systems, and impact of Islam.Terms offered: Spring 2017423 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GEOG315: GIST Programming I This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of programming for Geographic Information Systems using Python.Students will be taught elements, methods and theories of scripting in Python including how to write and manipulate functions, loops, strings, lists, dictionaries, and classes with an emphasis on how to apply these tools to writing scripts in the ArcGIS environment.The only way to learn programming is by doing, and therefore this course is based on weekly coding assignments, supplemented by traditional readings and lecture materials that will build students' conceptual understanding of their burgeoning skills.

Assessment will be based on weekly assignments, two midterm exams, and one in class presentation.Terms offered: Spring 2018424 Active Course Catalog GEOG330: Intro to Remote Sensing Introduction to remote sensing principles, techniques, and applications, designed principally for those with no background in the field.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG340: Cultural Geography This course will approach the field of cultural geography examining theoretical foundations and practical applications.It will also focus on the interactive relationships between culture and places, spaces, regions, and landscapes.Terms offered: Fall 2017425 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GEOG357: Geograph Research Method Formulation and solution of geographic problems; models, research design, and methods of gathering, analyzing, and portraying geographic data.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG362: Environment and Development This course evaluates theories and practices aimed at addressing the complex relationship between economic development and environmental protection in both industrialized and developing world contexts Terms offered: Spring 2018426 Active Course Catalog GEOG367: Population Geography Fertility, mortality, and migration as agents of demographic change.Topics include fertility control and LDCs; working mothers and NDCs; aging societies; legal/illegal immigration in the U.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG368: The Green Economy The Green Economy.

What is it and how does it function? What does it mean for our future? What are the implications for cities, community, and globalization? What kind of policies lay the foundation for green economic development, and what challenges and opportunities lie within? And what does 'green' mean anyway? This course is a challenging exploration into the day-to-day practices and policies of the green economy, particularly in the United States and the Southwest.The class will be devoted to understanding how the green economy functions and why, through readings, lectures, visiting speakers, and field studies.Terms offered: Spring 2018427 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GEOG370: Geog of Intrntnl Dvlpmnt Historical evolution of development theory and current debates in geography of international development.Planned micro to macro-level change over space and time examined related to employment, agriculture, food security, environment, migration and the household.Terms offered: Spring 2017 GEOG371: Princ+ Prac Regional Dev Introduction to basic concepts, objectives, practices and techniques of regional and industrial development as a professional activity, with emphasis on development problems and solutions.

Terms offered: Spring 2018428 Active Course Catalog GEOG372: Geography and Gender This course is an introduction to gender and geography.Students will explore a cross-section of geographic research that provides a variety of perspectives on geography and women, gendered geographies, and feminist frameworks.Terms offered: Fall 2017 GEOG373: Political Geography Explores links between global economic and political processes, national affairs and local politics.Designed to foster participation; assessment is via essays and assignments.Terms offered: Spring 2018429 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GEOG374: Geog, Social Justice & Env Introduction to theories of social justice with application to social, cultural, and economic geography.

What are the prevailing theories of social justice and how can we draw on them to assess movements and goals for social change? How do different geographical contexts inform our assessment of social justice concepts? Course will address theory, moral questions, and specific case studies equally.Terms offered: Fall 2017 GEOG375: Metropolitan Tucson Physical and cultural basis of Tucson's geographic patterns, with emphasis on the city's site, situation, settlement patterns and problems of growth and change.Terms offered: Fall 2017430 Active Course Catalog GEOG378: Global Human Rights This course will explore the meanings of human rights in different historical contexts, as well as analyze ongoing contemporary conflicts over the universality of human rights.Our analytical lens will include political philosophers, nation-states and international organizations, but we will also pursue alternative visions and voices, exploring how human rights debates in the "West" were shaped by an uneasy tension with colonialism and slavery.The course explores the role of major governmental and non-governmental institutions in human rights activism, and analyzes emerging approaches to transnational geographies of justice.

We will explore the ongoing contested boundaries of universal human rights protection, including gender and human rights; the collective rights of indigenous peoples; prisoners of war; and the rights of non-citizens within a global human rights regime still largely scripted by the dictates of national sovereignty.Terms offered: Spring 2017431 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GEOG379: Urban Growth+Development Location patterns in urban areas and processes of growth; historical development of U.cities, rent theory, housing markets, commercial and industrial location, the role of transportation, urban finance, New Urbanist planning and sustainable development concepts.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG391: Preceptorship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline.

Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.Terms offered: Spring 2018432 Active Course Catalog GEOG391H: Honors Preceptorship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline.Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG392A: Directed Rsrch In Geog Course offers rotating topic explorations of themes in human geography, physical geography, human-environment geography, and regional development.Serves as an research-oriented introduction to the major themes resonating throughout contemporary geography.

Terms offered: Spring 2018433 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GEOG393: Internship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG395A: Current Topics/Geography Exchange of scholarly information and/or primary research through the Department's regularly scheduled Colloquium Series.Student responsibilities include critical reviews of presentations by local and visiting faculty.This course gives students a broad survey of the latest research within the subdisciplines in Geography.

Terms offered: Spring 2018434 Active Course Catalog GEOG399: Independent Study Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG399H: Honors Independent Study Terms offered: Spring 2018435 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GEOG401A: Planning Theory and Practice This course is designed for advanced undergraduate students seeking careers in urban/regional planning, architecture, real estate development, and related fields.

The primary objective of the course is to introduce students to the planning profession and the tracks of study within the University of Arizona's Planning Degree Program.Some of the topics covered during the semester include: the scope and objectives of urban planning; the evolution of the city and the profession of planning; ethics in planning; the place of planning within the government and the law; and selected topics of interest to planners.Terms offered: Fall 2017 GEOG403: Appl Geog Info Sys General survey of principles of geographic information systems (GIS); applications of GIS to issues such as land assessment and evaluation of wildlife habitat; problem-solving with GIS.Terms offered: Spring 2018436 Active Course Catalog GEOG404: The Politics Of Nature Surveys political problems in environment/society relations by exploring the history of geographic theory surrounding environmental politics, surveying the local and global actors in conflicts, and addressing questions of biodiversity loss, forest conservation, and urban hazards.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG407: The American Landscape An in-depth exploration of how humans shape and are affected by a broad range of landscapes across the United States.

Students will have the opportunity to learn about and apply a variety of methods for studying human-landscape interactions across a great diversity of contexts.These might include: city spaces, suburbs, seascapes, national parklands, agricultural lands, cold war landscapes, borderlands, and others.Terms offered: Spring 2018437 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GEOG408: Arizona + The Southwest The changing character of the land and human occupancy of it, with emphasis on Arizona; historically and problem oriented.Terms offered: Spring 2017 GEOG414: Web Mobile GIST GIST 414 Web and Mobile Design is a required skills course for the BSGIST major.GIST 414 introduces students to the expanding field of web and mobile-based mapping applications development.

Students will apply skills gained in GIST I and Programming I and II to learn how to build interactive web and mobile apps that use geospatial data in an attractive format.Terms offered: Fall 2017438 Active Course Catalog GEOG415: GIST Programming II This course builds upon the scriptwriting skills students learned in GIST 315.In this class, students will write scripts to automate workflows in ArcGIS and extend the tools already available in the ArcToolbox to achieve creative problem solving.Topics include using Python with Model Builder, preparing data as strings, lists, tuples, and dictionaries prior to use, using Python to run SQL queries, working with rasters in Python, automating mapping tasks, and developing custom scripting tools.In addition to weekly assignments and readings, assessment will be oriented around a single, student-directed project that will take the second half of the semester to complete.

It will require students to write a simple script to accomplish a specified task in ArcGIS and present the results of their work to peers.Terms offered: Spring 2018439 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GEOG416A: Computer Cartography Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG416C: Urban Geog Info Systems Introduces concepts and application skills for use of geographic information systems to investigate a range of urban spatial issues and decision-making processes.Emphasis on complete process of GIS-based problem solving, including project planning, spatial data sources/acquisition, preparation/coding, analysis, representation, and communication.Terms offered: Fall 2017440 Active Course Catalog Terms offered: Spring 2018488 Active Course Catalog GEOG910: Thesis Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing).Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 GEOG920: Dissertation Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).Terms offered: Spring 2018489 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Geographic Information Systems Technology490 Active Course Catalog GIST214: Intro.to Map Science This course is intended to provide a comprehensive introduction to the use of maps and map-like images for communication, analysis, and decision support.Students will learn to acquire, read and interpret visual representations of the earth.These scientific principles are required for advancement and understanding of all geospatial technologies including geographic information systems, global positioning systems, and remote sensing.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 GIST314: Cartographic Design/Production Cartography is a fundamental tool of geography; it is also a science and art in its own right.Cartography uses principles of design, perception, statistics, and communication.This course introduces students to the design, production and interpretation of maps, a fundamental skill in GIST.Laboratory exercises give students additional experience with GIS-based skills, through the use of ArcGIS software.Terms offered: Fall 2017491 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GIST315: GIST Programming I This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of programming for Geographic Information Systems using Python.

Students will be taught elements, methods and theories of scripting in Python including how to write and manipulate functions, loops, strings, lists, dictionaries, and classes with an emphasis on how to apply these tools to writing scripts in the ArcGIS environment.The only way to learn programming is by doing, and therefore this course is based on weekly coding assignments, supplemented by traditional readings and lecture materials that will build students' conceptual understanding of their burgeoning skills.Assessment will be based on weekly assignments, two midterm exams, and one in class presentation.Terms offered: Spring 2018492 Active Course Catalog GIST330: Intro to Remote Sensing Introduction to remote sensing principles, techniques, and applications, designed principally for those with no background in the field.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GIST414: Web Mobile GIST GIST 414 Web and Mobile Design is a required skills course for the BSGIST major.

GIST 414 introduces students to the expanding field of web and mobile-based mapping applications development.Students will apply skills gained in GIST I and Programming I and II to learn how to build interactive web and mobile apps that use geospatial data in an attractive format.Terms offered: Fall 2017493 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GIST415: GIST Programming II This course builds upon the scriptwriting skills students learned in GIST 315.In this class, students will write scripts to automate workflows in ArcGIS and extend the tools already available in the ArcToolbox to achieve creative problem solving.Topics include using Python with Model Builder, preparing data as strings, lists, tuples, and dictionaries prior to use, using Python to run SQL queries, working with rasters in Python, automating mapping tasks, and developing custom scripting tools.

In addition to weekly assignments and readings, assessment will be oriented around a single, student-directed project that will take the second half of the semester to complete.It will require students to write a simple script to accomplish a specified task in ArcGIS and present the results of their work to peers.Terms offered: Spring 2018494 Active Course Catalog Terms offered: Fall 2017 GIST417: Geog Inf Sys/Nat+Soc Sci Introduction to the application of GIS and related technologies for both the natural and social sciences.Conceptual issues in GIS database design and development, analysis, and display.Terms offered: Spring 2018495 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GIST418: Analysis of Geospatial Data Introduction to spatial analysis and modeling techniques.

Students will learn how to use calculate spatial measurement, apply spatial statistical methods, create surfaces, and develop spatial modeling.Assignments will allow students to apply the methods to various real world problems.Terms offered: Fall 2017 GIST420: Adv Geographic Info Syst Examines various areas of advanced GIS applications such as dynamic segmentation, surface modeling, spatial statistics, and network modeling.The use of high performance workstations will be emphasized.

Terms offered: Spring 2018496 Active Course Catalog GIST482: Integrated Geospatial Technolo The course will cover resource mapping concepts and technologies.

Students are expected to have a background in GIS and remote sensing.Google Earth), remoting sensing technologies such as LiDAR and digital imagery, classification methods, and data integration.Students will be required to complete an independent mapping project.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GIST483: Geog Aplcn Remote Sens Use of aircraft and satellite imagery for monitoring landforms, soils, vegetation and land use, with the focus on problems of land-use planning, resource management and related topics.Terms offered: Spring 2018497 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GIST498: Senior Capstone A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the majors, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies.Terms offered: Spring 2018498 Active Course Catalog GIST601: Intro to GIST I This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of geographic information systems technology (GIST).It will emphasize equally GISystems and GIScience.Geographic information systems are a powerful set of tools for storing and retrieving at will, transforming and displaying spatial data from the real world for a particular set of purposes.In contrast, geographic information science is concerned with both the research on GIS and with GIS., notes (2001, vii) ¿GIS is fundamentally an applications-led technology, yet science underpins successful applications.¿ This course will combine an overview of the general principles of GIScience and how this relates to the nature and analytical use of spatial information within GIS software and technology.Students will apply the principles and science of GIST through a series of practical labs using ESRI¿s ArcGIS software.Terms offered: Spring 2018499 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GIST601A: GIS This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of geographic information systems technology (GIST).It will emphasize equally GISystems and GIScience.

Geographic information systems are a powerful set of tools for storing, retrieving, transforming and displaying spatial data from the real world for a particular set of purposes.In contrast, geographic information science is concerned with both the research on GIS and with GIS., notes (2001, vii) "GIS is fundamentally an applications-led technology, yet science underpins successful applications." This course will combine an overview of the general principles of GIScience and how this relates to the nature and analytical use of spatial information within GIS software and technology.

Students will apply the principles and science of GIST through a series of practical labs using ESRI's ArcGIS software.Terms offered: Spring 2018500 Active Course Catalog GIST601B: Remote Sensing Science This course provides an introduction to the scientific principles and practices of remote sensing.Topics that will be covered in this course include issues of spatial resolutions, the electromagnetic spectrum, remotely sensed sensors, spectral characteristics, digital and digitalization issues, multispectral and LiDAR image processing and enhancement, and land-use and land-cover classifications (LULC) and change detection.The course also emphasizes integration issues and analysis techniques that arise when merging remotely sensed data with geographic information systems (GIS).Terms offered: Spring 2018 GIST602: Intro to GIST II This course focuses on providing students with an introduction to spatial statistics, spatial analysis and their application in GIS software, and GIS programming.

Students will learn about descriptive spatial statistics, multivariate spatial statistics, and normality, how to analyze distribution, direction, orientation, clustering, spatial relationships and processes, and how to render analysis into cartographic form.GIS programming skills focus on calculating values needed for analyses, building models to perform repetitive tasks, and creating customized GIS interfaces.Terms offered: Fall 2017501 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GIST602A: Raster Spatial Analysis This course exams the principles and practices associated with raster data development and analysis, particularly the development of real world surfaces and statistical analysis based on these surfaces.The course is presented in a lecture/laboratory format.The lecture portion will deal with conceptual issues necessary for the use of raster approaches within a GIS framework.

The laboratory portion will provide practical experience with rasters in an ArcGIS environment.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GIST602B: Vector Spatial Analysis This course focuses on providing students with an introduction vector based spatial analysis and their application in GIS software.Students will learn about how to analyze distribution, direction, orientation, clustering, spatial relationships and processes, and how to render analytic outcomes into cartographic form.This course provides foundational knowledge of global positioning systems, data collection, geodatabase development, and georeferencing.Terms offered: Spring 2018502 Active Course Catalog GIST603: Adv GIST I This course focuses on providing students with an introduction to spatial statistics, spatial analysis and their application in GIS software, and GIS programming.

Students will learn about descriptive spatial statistics, multivariate spatial statistics, and normality, how to analyze distribution, direction, orientation, clustering, spatial relationships and processes, and how to render analysis into cartographic form.GIS programming skills focus on calculating values needed for analyses, building models to perform repetitive tasks, and creating customized GIS interfaces.Terms offered: Fall 2017503 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GIST604: Adv GIST II This course focuses on the integration of remote sensing with GIS and advance spatial analysis techniques.Principles of remote sensing examined include digital and multispectral image processing and enhancement, georectification, spectral characteristics, and land-use and land-cover boundary detection.As remote sensing deals with raster based data, there will also be an emphasis on integration of remotely sensed imagery and analysis with vector based data within ArcGIS.

This leads to integrative (raster/vector) based issues such as projection, scale, map overlay functionality, as well as analysis techniques that require the transformation of data (vector to raster, or raster to vector) to perform advanced spatial analysis.The advanced spatial analysis portion of the course examines Z-score evaluation, point pattern analysis, kernel density analysis, spatial interpolation methodology, map algebra, and error and uncertainty estimations.Terms offered: Fall 2017504 Active Course Catalog GIST909: MA Project in GIST The Master's Project includes a formal report and presentation submitted in lieu of a Master's Thesis and reflects what a student has learned from the MS in GIST program.This course requires a student to formulate, design, implement and present results related to a specific normative and/or scientific geographic problem.

This course will involve data capture, compilation and manipulation, and formulating methods and analysis to address a geographic problem in a given timeline.

The geographic problem under investigation will require research to be completed out side of class in the form of field work, ground truthing, or background research in the library or through other sources.Your Master's Project can focus on subjects related to personal interests, work done through an employer or an internship, or work that is supervised by a faculty or staff members on campus.Terms offered: Spring 2018505 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Gender & Women's Studies506 Active Course Catalog GWS150B1: Gender & Contemporary Society This course will encourage students to consider the ways in which gender influences issues of self-identity, social differences, and social status.It will provide students with an understanding of the connections between individuals and institutions such as mass media, the disciplines of science and medicine, and political and economic systems.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS150B2: Sex, Health and AIDS Recognizing that HIV/AIDS has irretrievably changed the lives of individuals and societies across the globe, this course sets out to explore this social and disease phenomenon from a number of perspectives.

Most importantly, the course approaches the topic with the recognition that most areas of concern surrounding HIV and AIDS are controversial and under debate, including the origins of the virus, ways to change behavior and conditions of sexual exchange, the social and economic causes of HIV transmission, funding allocations for research, and foreign policy concerning AIDS testing and funding.Terms offered: Spring 2018507 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS150B4: LGBTQ Studies Introduction to the study of sexual identities, communities and politics as they relate to gender, race and class in different cultural contexts.Special attention is given to social justice perspectives.Course is interdisciplinary in its approach, using literature, history, arts, and social science.Terms offered: Spring 2018508 Active Course Catalog GWS150B5: Sport, Sex, Identity This course is an exploration of the ways in which sports, as a reflection of society, are shaped by differences in social power, especially ideas about gender and race.

Topics include access to and conduct of youth and high school sports; access to and outcomes of participation in collegiate and professional sports, institutions and occupations and achievement in sports.How do sports reflect, reinforce, and challenge conventional ideas about health, bodies, sexuality, inequality, and identity? Explore new ideas about sports and related activities as they intersect with popular culture and science.Core topics include race, gender, sexuality, and national identity projects, and basic landmarks in the history of sport in the US.Secondary topics will vary but may include eating disorders/obesity, college sports finance and participation, injuries and risk, fitness crazes, sports participation and economic inequality, ability/disability, health disparities and physical activity, and related topics.Terms offered: Spring 2018509 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS160C1: Techn+Soc:Intro Sci+Tech This course is an introduction to the social, historical, and ethical contexts of knowledge, science and technology.

Although science and technology are perhaps the defining features of contemporary Western society, all cultures have distinct forms of knowledge and technical practices.These reflect their relationships to the questions relevant to scientists, engineers, and the general public, about the causes and contents of scientific and technical information.Course materials provide broad historical understanding of science and technology in Western culture.Terms offered: Fall 2017 GWS200: Women+Western Culture Examines the various ways in which women have been depicted in western philosophy, literature, and the arts from the classical Greek period to the present.Explores women's cultural expressions and representations of themselves.

Terms offered: Spring 2018510 Active Course Catalog GWS201: Intro Chicana/Latina Studies This course on Chicana women introduces students to basic concepts, categories and issues organized around the concept of gender.We examine gender and power relations within various institutions: the home, the school system, university, the church, the environment, and various human work spheres.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS202: Hist of Mod Sexualities Cross cultural history of the relationship of modern sexualities and the rise of capitalism, secularism, urbanization, imperialism, sexology, and sexual identity politics from the eighteenth century to the present.Terms offered: Spring 2017511 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS240: Gender in Transnational World This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to concepts of gender and an understanding of how gender shapes U.society, economy, politics, and culture.Through readings, guest lectures, discussions, films, and writing assignments, students learn how race, class, sexuality, culture, religion, and geopolitics inform gender.Focusing on topics including work, family, body, media, political organizing, and tourism, the course also explores how U.gender systems have shaped and been shaped by colonialism, capitalism, warfare, and interactions with people in other parts of the world, historically and now.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS254: Hist Wmn US:1890-Present Survey of diverse groups of women throughout colonial America and United States and their influence upon tribes, race, empire, politics, labor, economies, and society, 1890 to the present.Terms offered: Spring 2018512 Active Course Catalog GWS260: Sex, Gender, and Technology This Tier Two course draws on a variety of texts and media to explore the ways in which sex, gender, and the body are not as "natural" as we generally assume, and are in fact "always already" shaped by technology.To bring these ideas into sharper focus, we will pay attention to the ways that boundaries between humans, animals, and machines are constructed, and how they are broken down.Topics may include assisted reproduction, biotechnology, biological bodily differences, cosmetic and reconstructive surgeries, intersex and transgender issues, queer theory, sexual diversity in nature, sex toys, robotics, artificial intelligence, biopolitics and other similar issues.Terms offered: Fall 2017513 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS299: Independent Study Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS299H: Honors Independent Study Terms offered: Spring 2018514 Active Course Catalog Topic will vary.

Terms offered: Fall 2017515 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS305: Feminist Theories Explores feminist theories from various disciplines, analytical frameworks, and subject areas.Examines the construction, differentiation, and representation of the genders in different cultural settings, and the ways that race, class, sexuality, and geopolitics inform gender.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS306: Afr Am Autobiog:Wmn+Hist Students will gain insight into the historical and cultural factors that have created, and continue to perpetuate gender and ethnic inequity.Students will come to understand African American writers, particularly women, as historical agents and self-defined individuals.While the course will emphasize the multiple roles of African American women, as portrayed autobiographically it also incorporates the historical struggles of those around them.

It is my goal that through the course material students will see how African Americans are constantly recreating themselves in the face of adversity.Terms offered: Spring 2018516 Active Course Catalog GWS307: Chicana Fem:Hst,Thr+Prac This course will examine the varied and evolving concerns of Chicanas as they forge new visions of feminism through the Chicano Movement of the 1960s; organizing among Chicana lesbian communities; Chicanas' entrance into academic, literary and artistic arenas; diverse community and national activist efforts in the 1980s; and current transnational initiatives.Terms offered: Fall 2017 GWS309: Queer Theories Explores theories and critiques of sexuality, gender, race and nation, as they have been organized under the concept of `queer theory.' Topics include: historical emergence of queer theory in relation to histories of feminism, lesbian & gay studies, and social activism; queer of color critique; transgender activism and studies; theories of sexuality; the critique of identity; sexual cultures; and similarities and differences within lesbian, gay, trans, and queer theories.Terms offered: Fall 2017517 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS310: Tran Studies:Politics Personal Working with the assertion that "the personal is political" that emerged from Feminist of Color scholarship, this course will introduce students to transsexual identity and politics through memoir, autobiography, and self-narrative.

Students will learn how transsexuals require a story that authenticates their identification in order to receive medical, legal, and social care.From questions about pronoun use to "When did you know" or "How do you know," transsexual identity has a unique relationship with self-narrative and the biographical.How has this biographical imperative of transsexual subjectivity shaped theoretical, political, and aesthetic debates in Trans* and Transgender Studies? Attentive to questions of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and ability, this course will study how "the story of self" reveals the bond between embodiment and subjectivity, experiential and the social, inside and outside, and semiotics and materiality.Terms offered: Spring 2017518 Active Course Catalog GWS317: Science Fiction Study Science fiction is studied as a genre of film and print fiction in which we can imagine future societies and future science and technology in utopian and dystopian forms, paying particular attention to race/class/gender and depictions of identity and otherness, as well as social power in imagined societies.

Terms offered: Fall 2017 GWS321: Women In Judaism Images of Jewish women in Jewish and other texts.

Texts include religious, historical and literary genres from biblical, medieval, and modern sources.The course will deal with Jewish women as mothers, leaders, stereotypes, and current feminist viewpoints.Terms offered: Fall 2017519 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS323: Women: Power in Hinduism Explores the relationship between the Hindu goddess traditions, women, and the feminist spirituality movement in order to complicate the relationship that is often assumed to exist between women, goddesses, and power.Terms offered: Fall 2017 GWS325: Gndr/Sex & Intrnatl Migr Focusing on contemporary migration across international borders, we explore how migration contributes to the production, contestation, and remaking of gender and sexual norms as these intersect with hierarchies of race, class, and geopolitics.We particularly examine how the selection, incorporation, and governance of migrants provide occasions for challenging, renegotiating, or affirming dominant gender and sexual norms; how migrants contest multiple exclusions and refashion identities, communities, and politics through gender and sexuality; and how transnational social fields, grounded in histories of empire and global capitalism, shape and are reshaped by these processes.

Terms offered: Spring 2018520 Active Course Catalog GWS328: Women In Russ Lit+Cultr Images of Russian women as reflected in literary, historical, and religious texts.Cultural attitudes revealed help to understand the status and role of women in today's Russia.Terms offered: Fall 2017 GWS330: Feminist Philosophy This course explores the ways in which philosophers contributed to the development of feminism, and the ways in which feminist theory is expanding and challenging mainstream philosophy in turn.Terms offered: Spring 2018521 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS335: Gender and Politics Examination of politics through the lens of gender hierarchy.Emphasis on how constrictions of masculinity and femininity shape and are shaped by interacting economic, political and ideological practices.

Terms offered: Fall 2017 GWS342: Writers, Women+The Gods In order to conceptualize the way gender and ethnicity has shaped women's lives in the public and private domain students will "hear" the voices of African American women in ethnography, history and literature as we discuss the Africana concepts of life, health, beauty and family.The experiences of these women, as expressed in literature have become "formidable" presences in African American culture and history.The self-expression and self-definition, expressed by African American women's voices have generated social and political changes in American history that have also impacted the dominant Euro-American culture of American society.Terms offered: Spring 2018522 Active Course Catalog GWS344: Jour, Gender+Multicultur The course will investigate the intersection of journalism, gender and multiculturalism in the U.It will survey efforts to increase and improve diversity in the news media.Course will be offered online Terms offered: Summer 2017 GWS351A: Intro LGBTQQC Texts Survey with emphasis on writers in their literary and historical contexts.Terms offered: Fall 2017523 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS362: Women+Gender/Antiquity Terms offered: Fall 2017 GWS372: Geography and Gender This course is an introduction to gender and geography.

Students will explore a cross-section of geographic research that provides a variety of perspectives on geography and women, gendered geographies, and feminist frameworks.Terms offered: Fall 2017524 Active Course Catalog GWS386: Race/Gendr:Gene,Form,Pol This course examines the gendered constitution of race in the U., from 18th century naturalism and 19th century scientific racism, to 20th and 21st century eugenics, multiculturalism, neoliberalism, and "color blindness".Terms offered: Spring 2017 GWS391: Preceptorship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline.

Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.Terms offered: Spring 2018525 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS393: Internship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS399: Independent Study Terms offered: Spring 2018526 Active Course Catalog GWS399H: Honors Independent Study Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS406: Gender + Social Identity An analysis of the social and cultural construction of gender across cultures.Emphasis will be on preindustrial societies, using data to test theories of gender.Terms offered: Spring 2018527 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS411: Human Sexuality in World Hist In this course we will trace the evolution of sexualities in historical context and the way human societies around the World construct their notions of sexualities over time.

We will survey important developments in the history of sexuality from approximately 5000 B.We will concentrate on human beings' changing perceptions of the meaning of sexualities and how they relate to the dynamics of the political, cultural, and social movements that dominated World history throughout this period.

In the modern period, people have attached meanings to sexualities that reflect deep social divisions between states and societies about the assignment of sexual and gender norms, regulation, criminalization, and sexual politics.We will try to ascertain the historical development of these contested meanings.Terms offered: Spring 2018528 Active Course Catalog GWS418: Women And Literature Analysis of selected writings by women, as well as representations of women in literature, with attention to social and intellectual contexts.Terms offered: Fall 2017529 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS425: Gender, Culture and Capitalism This course explores the relationship between economic processes (especially capitalism), social formations such as gender, race, ethnicity, nation and sexuality, and the production and consumption of culture, in the various senses of that complex term.We will read fundamental texts of liberal and marxist theory, various attempts to integrate marxist, feminist and anti-racist analyses, and theories that situate culture in relation to industrialization, globalization, and international divisions of labor.

We will also take up numerous case studies, analyzing the discourses of class, gender, race and sexuality as they are deployed in and promoted by cultural texts that engage diverse issues of contemporary concern.Terms offered: Fall 2017530 Active Course Catalog GWS427: Women and Work A sociological analysis of historical trends and current patterns of gender inequity in paid and domestic labor.Terms offered: Fall 2017 GWS430: Queer Cinema This course provides an upper level introduction to LGBTQ issues in cinema, and includes films from the much acclaimed "New Queer Cinema" of the 1990s.Students will consider how gay and queer sexualities are produced in these films and what debates the films generated.We will study what it means to "queer" a film and the limitations of "positive images.

" We will also examine how alternative genders and sexualities are produced alongside ethnic, cultural, religious, and regional differences.Terms offered: Spring 2018531 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS432: Social Justice Movement Media This course will survey the history and functions of social justice publishing.Students will consider the theoretical and practical frameworks of social justice media, which serve a swathe of social movements involving human and civil rights, education, labor, immigration, globalization, feminism, environmentalism, ethnic and racial equality, transgender rights, and global inequity.

This course will provide students with the historical and theoretical frameworks necessary to evaluate and publish social justice media.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS438A: Wmn Health Global Persp Biocultural perspective on health issues/risks women face around the world using a life cycle approach beginning with the birth of girl babies through the aging process.Terms offered: Summer 2017532 Active Course Catalog GWS445: Women In Islamic History Examination of the roles women have played throughout Islamic history and of the changing discourse in the Islamic community about women and their roles.Terms offered: Fall 2017 GWS448: Sociology of the Body Sociology of the Body examines the relationship between society and the human body, from broad issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality, to everyday trends such as dieting, body building, and tattooing.Terms offered: Spring 2018533 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS450: American Indian Women Interdisciplinary exploration of new information available on American Indian women, especially materials written by Indian women and investigation of the status, experience, and contributions of American Indian women from pre-contact to contemporary times.Terms offered: Spring 2018534 Active Course Catalog GWS453: Women and Work Statement of purpose: Why should we study women's work? Is work the key to women's power or to their continuing subordination? What defines "women's work" and do only women do it? Are gendered divisions of labor an inescapable fact of nature, or do they have a history? What types of work have women performed from society to society, across time and space? How have historical and cultural contexts affected women's work? In this course we will examine women's work in a variety of societies in the past and present, asking how women's lives were shaped by their work, and how their work in turn made a difference in shaping their societies.

We will also attempt better to understand what may be common to women and their work in different places and times, and how to account for the many differences.Like other upper-division history courses, this one demands substantial reading and writing.Terms offered: Spring 2018535 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS455: Hist of Women In Europe This course will examine the history of women in Europe for the past several centuries, exploring women's participation in social and family labor systems as well as religious, political and cultural life.We will explore how women simultaneously participated in and coped with historical processes such as changing religious and political systems, commercialization and industrialization, and state formation.We will examine major areas of human activity--economic, political, cultural, social, religious, intellectual, to see how they shaped and were in turn shaped by women's activities and women's experiences.

We will consider what this has implied for women's autonomy, choices, and power.Terms offered: Spring 2017536 Active Course Catalog International history of a topic of the instructor's choice.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS459: Sociology Of Gender Social construction, variation and consequences of gender categories across time and space.Topical (decision-making, deviance) and institutional (family, religion, politics) approaches.Terms offered: Fall 2017537 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS461: Feminist and IR Theories Issues in epistemology; survey and integration of feminist and IR theories; application of feminist theories to IR.

Terms offered: Fall 2017 GWS463: Gender Issue+Women's Lit This course introduces Middle Eastern women's issues through a critical reading of literary works written by women in the major languages of the Near East (Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, and Turkish) that are available in translation.Readings include poetry, short stories, and novels all analyzed within their social context.Terms offered: Spring 2018538 Active Course Catalog GWS469: Gender & Sexuality in Latin Am This course explores selected themes in Latin American history through gender as a category of historical analysis.Students will examine histories of men, women, gender and sexuality in different countries and regions of the Americas.Terms offered: Summer 2017539 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS471: Iran: Cinema, Gender, Society Iran has been lauded as one of the great exporters of cinema during the last two decades.

During this time, Iranian films have won countless international awards and enjoyed great reviews.Through the analysis of movies, the history of Iranian cinema, cinematic criticism, and historical texts, this course helps students understand the process of social change in that society and the ways such changes influence the production of art.Students watch a variety of movies and read analytical and theoretical writings on cinema all placed in their social and historical contexts.Particular attention will be paid to issues such as gender, modernization, nationalism, class struggle, and ideological enunciations.The course will try to conceptualize past cinematic movements in order to understand how Iranian cinema has gained its current status.

Assignments include weekly reports on the movies and readings, class participation, and a term paper.Terms offered: Fall 2017540 Active Course Catalog GWS487: Fem Interpretations of Health This course examines health as a biomedical and ideological category in relation to questions of gender, race, class and sexuality.Issues include the social, cultural, and institutional contexts shaping health and disease patterns; societal understandings of those contexts and patterns; and relationships between health and social inequality.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS490: Women Mid East Societ Middle Eastern society viewed from the perspective of women.Examines the extent to which formal definitions of women's nature and roles coincide with women's self-images and activities.

Terms offered: Spring 2018541 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS493: Internship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS498: Senior Capstone A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies.Terms offered: Fall 2017542 Active Course Catalog GWS498H: Honors Thesis An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors.Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence.

The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS499: Independent Study Terms offered: Spring 2018543 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS499H: Honors Independent Study Terms offered: Spring 2018 Topics will vary.Graduate-level requirements include additional readings, a book review, and a paper.Terms offered: Spring 2017544 Active Course Catalog GWS511: Human Sexuality in World Hist In this course we will trace the evolution of sexualities in historical context and the way human societies around the World construct their notions of sexualities over time.We will survey important developments in the history of sexuality from approximately 5000 B.

We will concentrate on human beings' changing perceptions of the meaning of sexualities and how they relate to the dynamics of the political, cultural, and social movements that dominated World history throughout this period.In the modern period, people have attached meanings to sexualities that reflect deep social divisions between states and societies about the assignment of sexual and gender norms, regulation, criminalization, and sexual politics.

We will try to ascertain the historical development of these contested meanings.Graduate-level requirements include more extensive readings, in addition to the readings assigned for the undergraduate course.Graduate students are expected to attend the undergraduate lectures regularly and meet with the instructor on a group basis, twice monthly, in order to discuss regular course readings.Graduate students will write response papers (2 page single-spaced maximum) on their class readings, an annotated bibliography or research paper, and a historiography paper or research paper.

Graduate student grading will be as follows; Meetings/Engagement/Preparation 40%, Response papers 20%, Annotated Bibliography or Research Paper 20%, Historiography Paper or Research Paper 20%.

Terms offered: Spring 2018545 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS530: Queer Cinema Cinema has a privileged relationship with sexuality -- fantasy and desire shape how we watch film.Starting with Edison's Dickinson Experimental Sound Film (1895), a film of two men waltzing, the course examines how film has been shaped by queer fantasies, identities, and sexualities.For instance, by rigorously re-working cinematic conventions -- non-narrative, abstraction, discontinuity, and foregrounding of the film apparatus -- experimental film resonates and echoes queer theory's commitments to dis-identification, non-normativity, deconstruction, and other anti-social principles.In this course, we will reflect on the following questions, and more: What constitutes queer film, queer characters, and queer dis/pleasures? How might we define, or conceptualize, a queer aesthetics? How is spectatorship shaped by sexuality, and how does queerness alter this relationship? Is there a cost to LGBTQ visibility through cinema, and if so, what is it? How is queerness made un/legible through gender, race, sexuality, and nation, and ability? Is film inherently queer? Graduate-level requirements include additional readings and teaching or co-teaching one class meeting.Teaching will include preparing a lecture or class discussion concerning pre-screened films and assigned readings.

Terms offered: Spring 2018546 Active Course Catalog GWS532: Social Justice Movement Media This online course will survey the history and functions of social justice publishing.Students will consider the theoretical and practical frameworks of social justice media, which serve a swathe of social movements involving human and civil rights, education, labor, immigration, globalization, feminism, environmentalism, ethnic and racial equality, transgender rights, and global inequity.This course will provide students with the historical and theoretical frameworks necessary to evaluate and publish social justice media.Course expectations are higher for students taking the course at the 500-level.Standards for quality of writing and depth of research are higher, and assignments are more demanding.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS539B: Feminist Theories II This course is Part 2 of a two-semester survey of feminist theories.The course covers major issues, debates and texts of feminist theory and situates feminist theory in relation to a variety of intellectual and political movements.The course is a discussion format and requires active participation of all students.Terms offered: Spring 2018547 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS545: Women In Islamic History Examination of the roles women have played throughout Islamic history and of the changing discourse in the Islamic community about women and their roles.Graduate-level requirements include additional readings and meetings with the instructor and an additional research paper.

Terms offered: Fall 2017 GWS563: Gender Issue+Women's Lit This course introduces Middle Eastern women's issues through a critical reading of literary works written by women in the major languages of the Near East (Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, and Turkish) that are available in translation.Readings include poetry, short stories, and novels all analyzed within their social context.Graduate-level requirements include additional reading from the suggested bibliography, longer written papers, an oral presentation and bi-weekly meeting with instructor.Theoretical issues will be addressed and presented in additional material.Terms offered: Spring 2018548 Active Course Catalog GWS569: Gender & Sexuality in Latin Am This course explores selected themes in Latin American history through gender as a category of historical analysis.

Students will examine histories of men, women, gender and sexuality in different countries and regions of the Americas.Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a topic approved by the instructor.Terms offered: Spring 2017549 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS570: Feminization of Migrate Worldwide human migration and displacements are at an all time high because of political, economic, and environmental upheavals.In the Americas, in particular, there has been a steady increase in migration to the U.from Mexico and Latin America since the 1960s.The most significant change has been the greater participation of women due in part to the negative impact of structural adjustment programs (SAPs) resulting in the impoverishment of agricultural sectors and lack of employment opportunities, a combination known to produce the feminization of migration.In this class, we will explore this phenomenon and the various challenges borne by women and youths.We will consider relevant theories, such as structural violence, as well as a wide range of perspectives, combining demography, history, ethnography and public policy analysis to better understand issues of borders, transnational identities, human rights, labor rights, and responsibilities of host and sending states.Terms offered: Spring 2018550 Active Course Catalog GWS571: Iran: Cinema, Gender, Society Iran has been lauded as one of the great exporters of cinema during the last two decades.

During this time, Iranian films have won countless international awards and enjoyed great reviews.Through the analysis of movies, the history of Iranian cinema, cinematic criticism, and historical texts, this course helps students understand the process of social change in that society and the ways such changes influence the production of art.Students watch a variety of movies and read analytical and theoretical writings on cinema all placed in their social and historical contexts.Particular attention will be paid to issues such as gender, modernization, nationalism, class struggle, and ideological enunciations.The course will try to conceptualize past cinematic movements in order to understand how Iranian cinema has gained its current status.

Assignments include weekly reports on the movies and readings, class participation, and a term paper.Graduate Students are encouraged to give a short presentation (10 to 20 minutes), preferably on the topic of their paper.Graduate students must also write a 17-20 page research paper.Terms offered: Fall 2017551 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS586: Transnational Feminisms The intellectual and political field of "Transnational Feminisms," although almost instantly institutionalized from the moment of its articulation, is still very much a field-in-formation.There are a lot of ways to articulate its roots and relationships.

This course will draw from feminist anthropology, ethnic studies, women's studies, history (particularly subaltern studies and the history of U.Terms offered: Spring 2017 GWS590: Women Mid East Society Middle Eastern society viewed from the perspective of women.Examines the extent to which formal definitions of women's nature and roles coincide with women's self-images and activities.

Graduate-level requirements include an additional paper.Terms offered: Fall 2017552 Active Course Catalog GWS591: Preceptorship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline.Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS593: Internship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.

Terms offered: Spring 2018553 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS599: Independent Study Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.

Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS691: Presceptorship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline.Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.Terms offered: Spring 2018554 Active Course Catalog Terms offered: Fall 2017 GWS696G: Queer Theories This seminar examines theories of sexuality, focusing on relations between sexuality, gender, race, and economic processes.The course may include foundational theorists such as Foucault, Butler, and Sedgwick as well as the most recent publications in the field.

Terms offered: Spring 2018555 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS696M: Gender/Sex+Intrnl Migrat The course examines sexuality as the site where multiple concerns about international migration (including social, cultural, political, economic and national) are expressed and contested, in the context of globalization and transnationalism.Terms offered: Fall 2017 GWS699: Independent Study Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.Terms offered: Spring 2018556 Active Course Catalog GWS799: Independent Study Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS910: Thesis Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing).Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.Terms offered: Spring 2018557 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences GWS920: Dissertation Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).Terms offered: Spring 2018 GWS457A: Modern East Asia Introductory survey of recent histories of China, Japan and Korea, focusing on the major watersheds in these countries' modern experiences.The roles of indigenous culture and forces of change as well as foreign influences will be considered.

Terms offered: Spring 2017558 Active Course Catalog Terms offered: Spring 2018658 Active Course Catalog HIST910: Thesis Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing).Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.Terms offered: Spring 2018 HIST920: Dissertation Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).Terms offered: Spring 2018659 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences HIST699: Introduction to Game Design This course provides an introduction to game design and teaches students the fundamental concepts for creating games.Students will survey many different games, exploring the issues game designers face when designing games in different genres.

Students will participate in a series of game design challenges and will be responsible for designing and prototyping simple games using a game building tool.Students will present their solutions to these challenges in front of the class for general discussion and constructive criticism.Terms offered: Spring 2018 HIST399H: Advanced Reporting Comprehensive and accurate news presentation with emphasis on interview techniques and coverage of major news stories.Completion of this course with a C or better also satisfies Mid Career Writing Assessment (MCWA).Terms offered: Spring 2017660 Active Course Catalog HIST399H: Principles of Multimedia This is a multimedia course that will introduce you to multimedia reporting which is some combination of text, still photographs, video clips, audio, graphics and interactivity presented on a Web site in a nonlinear format in which the information in each medium is complementary, not redundant.

Through interactive exercises you will learn about four basic elements: audio; shooting still photographs and video; editing; and storytelling using a variety of multimedia platforms.Terms offered: Spring 2017 HIST278: Reporting Public Affairs Study and practice of newsgathering on executive, legislative, and judicial levels in city, county, state and federal governments, with emphasis on both deadline writing and in-depth stories.Terms offered: Spring 2017661 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences HIST399H: Thesis Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing).Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.Terms offered: Spring 2017662 Active Course Catalog INFO492: Directed Research Terms offered: Spring 2018 INFO493: Internship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.

Such work must be approved and supervised by a School of Information faculty member.Terms offered: Spring 2018664 Active Course Catalog INFO499: Independent Study Terms offered: Spring 2018 INFO505: Foundations of Information This course introduces fundamental ideas of the Information Age, focusing on the value, organization, use, and processing of information.The course is organized as a survey of these ideas, with readings from the research literature., visualization, retrieval) will be covered by guest faculty who research in each of these areas.Terms offered: Fall 2017665 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences INFO507: Information Research Methods This seminar introduces fundamental methods for both qualitative and quantitative research in information studies.Additionally, the seminar introduces the student to established and emerging areas of scholarly research in Schools of Information to encourage her to identify a personal research agenda.The seminar is organized in two main parts: the first part introduces relevant research methods (quantitative and qualitative), whereas the second part overviews specific research directions currently active in the School of Information.The second part of the seminar will be covered by guest faculty who research in each of the covered areas.

Terms offered: Spring 2018666 Active Course Catalog INFO514: Computational Social Science This course will guide students through advanced applications of computational methods for social science research.Students will be encouraged to consider social problems from across sectors, like health science, education, environmental policy and business.Particular attention will be given to the collection and use of data to study social networks, online communities, electronic commerce and digital marketing.Students will consider the many research designs used in contemporary social research and will learn to think critically about claims of causality, mechanisms, and generalization in big data studies.Graduate requirements include additional readings and a more in-depth final paper than is required at the undergraduate level.

Terms offered: Spring 2018667 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences INFO515: Organization/Information Introduction to the theories and practices used in the organization of information.Overview of national and international standards and practices for access to information in collections.Terms offered: Spring 2018668 Active Course Catalog INFO516: Intro: Human Computer Interact The field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) encompasses the design, implementation, and evaluation of interactive computing systems.This course will provide a survey of HCI theory and practice.

The course will address the presentation of information and the design of interaction from a human-centered perspective, looking at relevant perceptive, cognitive, and social factors influencing in the design process.

It will motivate practical design guidelines for information presentation through Gestalt theory and studies of consistency, memory, and interpretation.Technological concerns will be examined that include interaction styles, devices, constraints, affordances, and metaphors.Theories, principles and design guidelines will be surveyed for both classical and emerging interaction paradigms, with case studies from practical application scenarios.As a central theme, the course will promote the processes of usability engineering, introducing the concepts of participatory design, requirements analysis, rapid prototyping, iterative development, and user evaluation.Both quantitative and qualitative evaluation strategies will be discussed.

This course is co-convened: Upper-level undergraduates and graduate students are encouraged to enroll.Graduate students will be expected to complete more substantial projects and will be given more in-depth reading assignments.Terms offered: Spring 2018669 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences INFO517: Intro to Digital Cultures Digital information technologies shape our lives.The benefits and the possible dangers of digital information technologies will be explored from a multidisciplinary perspective, looking at the insights into our digital age from history, linguistics sociology, political theory, information science, and philosophy.Students will have opportunities for active reflection on the ways in which digital technology shapes learning and social interaction.

Graduate-level requirements include different percent break-down of requirements and more stringent expectations in work produced.Terms offered: Spring 2018670 Active Course Catalog INFO519: Knowledge in a Digital World We do all sorts of things with information technology: we play games, we listen to music, we watch movies, and we communicate with other people.But one of the main things that we use information technology for is to learn things.Toward this end, we visit Wikipedia, , The New York Times, and other such sites.Or we just Google stuff that we want to know about.

This course is about how information technology is affecting the ability of individuals and institutions to acquire and share knowledge.We will look at the following sorts of questions: * What impact are Google, iPhones, and iPads having on how we know things? * Should we trust the information that we find on social networking sites like Wikipedia and ? * How do people try to deceive us on the web? * Do intellectual property laws, such as the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, promote or impede our ability to acquire knowledge? * Can we really be informed citizens if the blogosphere completely replaces traditional journalism? * In a digital world, what things do we have a right to know and what things do we have an obligation to know? Graduate-level requirements include more in-depth projects and group presentations.Terms offered: Fall 2017671 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences INFO520: Ethics Library+Info Prof Study of the basics of ethical theory and its application to problems in information management.Application and development of ethical codes in cases studies.Terms offered: Spring 2018 INFO521: Intro to Machine Learning Machine learning describes the development of algorithms which can modify their internal parameters (i.

, "learn") to recognize patterns and make decisions based on example data.These examples can be provided by a human, or they can be gathered automatically as part of the learning algorithm itself.This course will introduce the fundamentals of machine learning, will describe how to implement several practical methods for pattern recognition, feature selection, clustering, and decision making for reward maximization, and will provide a foundation for the development of new machine learning algorithms.Terms offered: Fall 2017672 Active Course Catalog INFO522: Applied Cyberinfrastruct Conc Students will learn from experts from projects that have developed widely adopted foundational Cyberinfrastrcutrue resources, followed by hands-on laboratory exercises focused around those resources.

Students will use these resources and gain practical experience from laboratory exercises for a final project using a data set and meeting requirements provided by domain scientists.Students will be provided access to computer resources at: UA campus clusters, iPlant Collaborative and at NSF XSEDE.Students will also learn to write a proposal for obtaining future allocation to large scale national resources through XSEDE.Graduate-level requirements include reading a paper related to cyberinfrastructure, present it to the class, and lead a discussion on the paper.Terms offered: Fall 2017673 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences INFO540: Introduction To Archives Provides an introduction to the archival profession with focus on theory and practice in the areas of appraisal and acquisition, arrangement and description, reference, preservation, exhibitions, outreach, and electronic resource development.

Terms offered: Fall 2017 INFO550: Artificial Intelligence The methods and tools of Artificial Intelligence used to provide systems with the ability to autonomously problem solve and reason with uncertain information.Topics include: problem solving (search spaces, uninformed and informed search, games, constraint satisfaction), principles of knowledge representation and reasoning (propositional and first-order logic, logical inference, planning), and representing and reasoning with uncertainty (Bayesian networks, probabilistic inference, decision theory).Graduate-level requirements include additional reading of supplementary material, more rigorous tests and homework assignments, and a more sophisticated course ticated application and technique.Terms offered: Spring 2018674 Active Course Catalog INFO551: Game Development This course provides an introduction to video game development.We will explore game design (not just computer games, but all games) and continue with an examination of game prototyping.

Once we have working prototypes, we will continue with the development of a complete 2D computer game.The remaining course topics include: designing the game engine, rendering the graphics to the screen, and artificial intelligence.Students will be given periodic homework that reinforces what was learned in class.Homework will include developing a game prototype, game design documentation, some programming tasks.Students will work in small teams to develop a working game as a term project.

Grades will be primarily based on the term project with some small amount of weight to homework.The examples provided in class will be programmed in Java and available for execution on any operating system.Programming homework assignments will be done in either Java or the language chosen by the instructor.The term project can be written in any programming language with instructor permission.Terms offered: Spring 2018675 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences INFO557: Neural Networks Neural networks are a branch of machine learning that combines a large number of simple computational units to allow computers to learn from and generalize over complex patterns in data.

Students in this course will learn how to train and optimize feed forward, convolutional, and recurrent neural networks for tasks such as text classification, image recognition, and game playing.Terms offered: Spring 2018676 Active Course Catalog INFO567: Leadership & the Info Org All information organizations (libraries, archives, museums, and public and corporate organizations involved in information management) have leadership expectations of their professional employees whether they are in management positions or not.This course focuses the theories, principles, and practices of leadership in these organizations.The course will cover what is leadership and how it differs from management.

It will identify what it means to be a professional-- career versus job orientation; understanding personal strengths and management styles (Myers-Briggs, Emotional Intelligence); and professional values-- customer focus, continual learning, diversity.

It will also cover understanding organizations and organizational cultures; working on teams; collaboration and negotiation; project management; data based decisions; program development and budgeting, assessment and evaluation; communication skills and interpersonal skills-- including giving and receiving constructive feedback; managing conflict; relationship building and networking; leading change and managing up; and what to look for in a new position.Terms offered: Fall 2017677 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences INFO570: Database Dev And Mgmt This course covers theory, methods, and techniques widely used to design and develop a relational database system and students will develop a broad understanding of modern database management systems.applications of fundamental database principles in a stand-alone database environment using MS Access and Windows are emphasized.Applications in an Internet environment will be discussed using MySQL in the Linux platform.Graduate-level requirements include a group project consisting of seven sections: Database Design; Implementation (Tables); Forms; Data Retrieval (Queries/Reports); Project Presentation; Project Report; and, Peer Evaluation.

Terms offered: Fall 2017 INFO571: Intro Info Technology This course is designed to introduce the basic concepts and applications of Internet-related information technology and its impacts on individual users, groups, organizations, and society.The topics in this survey course include computing basics, network applications, human computer interactions, computer-support cooperative work, social aspects of information systems, and some economic and legal issues related to digital services and products.Terms offered: Spring 2018678 Active Course Catalog INFO575: User Interf+Website Dsgn Study of the user interface in information systems, of human computer interaction, and of website design and evaluation.Graduate-level requirements include group work and longer examinations.Terms offered: Spring 2018 INFO584: Introduct To Copyright Introduces the basics of copyright law and fair use, also discusses the theoretical foundations and history of copyright and the public domain.

These issues are placed within a broader multicultural and international context.By the end of the course students will: (a) know the basics of copyright law and fair use as they apply to libraries and related information services, and (b) understand the importance of balancing the rights of intellectual property owners with the societal need for a robust public domain.Graduate-level requirements include an individual project on a topic chosen in consultation with the professor.Terms offered: Fall 2017679 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences INFO587: Info Seeking Behaviors Information-seeking theories, methods, and user behaviors will be covered in order to gain an understanding of how people seek, gather, retrieve and use information.Information-seeking behavior draws on literature from library and information science, psychology, and communications.

Graduate-level requirements include conducting a real-world experience or evaluation of information seeking behaviors in a self selected social context and information system.The project will include a two-page proposal of the experience due at the mid term and an online presentation to the class of the findings of the study, including; problem/issue studies, research question, data collected and analyzed, significance to the social context, and a statement of personal relationships to the topic and participants.Terms offered: Summer 2017680 Active Course Catalog INFO589: Scholarly Communication Structure and workings of scholarly communication and products in the U.Examines the content and technology of scholarly communication in various disciplines.

Terms offered: Spring 2017681 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences INFO601: Intro to GIST I This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of geographic information systems technology (GIST).It will emphasize equally GISystems and GIScience.Geographic information systems are a powerful set of tools for storing and retrieving at will, transforming and displaying spatial data from the real world for a particular set of purposes.In contrast, geographic information science is concerned with both the research on GIS and with GIS., notes (2001, vii) ¿GIS is fundamentally an applications-led technology, yet science underpins successful applications.¿ This course will combine an overview of the general principles of GIScience and how this relates to the nature and analytical use of spatial information within GIS software and technology.Students will apply the principles and science of GIST through a series of practical labs using ESRI¿s ArcGIS software.Terms offered: Spring 2018682 Active Course Catalog The planning/evaluation cycle as an approach to assessing various information center services.Terms offered: Spring 2018683 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences INFO640: Adv Archives: Apprsl & Dscr This course examines the archivist's `first' responsibility - the appraisal of records for long-term preservation.

Appraisal is first in the sequence of archival functions and, therefore, influences all subsequent archival activities.Importantly, appraisal is integral in archiving as, through it, archivists determine what sliver of the total human documentary production will actually become `archives' and thus part of society's historical narrative and collective memory.By performing appraisal and selection, archivists are thereby actively shaping the future's history of our times.Topics covered in this course include: Historical Foundations, Key Ideas, and Debates in Appraisal; Appraisal Methods and Strategies; Appraisal for Specific Formats and Genres; and Issues Relating to Appraisal, Democratization, Ethics, and Social Justice.Course readings, assignments, lectures, and discussions will provide students with a thorough knowledge of the basic theories, strategies, professional practices and discourses concerning appraisal with an orientation to doing this job well as working archivists.

Students are expected to attend all classes, do all assigned readings, and participate in in-class and online discussions.Discussions are an integral part of this class as we make sense of our readings and everyday practices together.Participation is absolutely necessary for success.Students are encouraged to integrate relevant prior classroom learning, and personal, professional, and research experiences and reflect upon how these might be utilized or translated in order to work with communities, their archives, and archival materials.

Terms offered: Spring 2018684 Active Course Catalog INFO671: Intro Digital Curation/Preserv LIS/INFO 671 introduces the basic functions of: * digital curation, a term that refers to the full set of management processes needed to create, select, describe, preserve and facilitate access to all types of digital collections, and * digital preservation, a formal endeavor to ensure that digital information of continuing value remains accessible and usable.We will focus primarily on digital curation and preservation in archives, libraries and museums, but we will also explore and compare digital curation and preservation practices from other disciplines, such as e-commerce, government documents and various business document systems and collections, in order to understand both the differences and similarities in the organization, management and preservation of different digital collections.By concentrating on common principles of information organization and information life cycles, you will be able to translate your learning and skills to many kinds of digital collections across disciplines and institutional cultures.This course will also introduce the basic problems associated with digital preservation.It will give students a thorough orientation to the technological and organizational approaches, which have been developed to address long-term preservation concerns.

Finally, the course will examine the current state of the art in digital preservation and assess what challenges remain in research and implementation efforts.This course is designed to help new information professionals identify roles to play in managing and preserving digital objects and collections, and at the same time to enhance their effectiveness in working across organizational and technical boundaries.Terms offered: Fall 2017685 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences INFO672: Intro Applied Technology This course provides a basic understanding of technology in the digital information environment along with an introduction to practical hands-on skills needed to manage digital information.The course combines reading, discussion, collaboration, project work, independent study, and guided hands-on practice.

The course covers the basic installation, setup and maintenance of key systems found in the digital information environment today.

Linux is used as a foundation for learning while drawing parallels to the Windows server operating system, Unix operating systems, and other operating systems.Terms offered: Fall 2017 INFO675: Adv Digital Collections This three-credit course is one of six required for completion of the Certificate in Digital Information Management (DigIn).This course will provide an in-depth look at the processes involved in building and managing digital collections and institutional repositories.The course will have a strong hands-on component in which students will apply advanced resource description methods to a collection, and then build a prototype repository along with a basic access system.Students will also analyze and discuss case examples of digital collections, focusing on technology management issues and organizational strategies for building different types of collections.

Terms offered: Spring 2018686 Active Course Catalog INFO692: Directed Research Directed Research courses are intended to cover advanced material outside of or beyond the scope of current course offerings.In such courses, the student will work on a research project under the direct supervision of a School of Information faculty member.The research topic should be relevant to MS degree competencies and contribute to the development of the student¿s knowledge and skill sets in the field of Information Science.The student should propose a research plan including the expected outcome and the faculty advisor should approve it before registration.The research plan should include a problem statement, proposed research methods, expected outcome, a schedule of research activities and meeting schedule between the student and the faculty advisor, and the assessment of the student performance.

The amount of the work should be appropriate for the requested credits.The primary faculty advisor must be an SI faculty, but faculty members from other units may participate in advising the student.Terms offered: Spring 2018687 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences INFO693: Internship Internship is intended to provide an opportunity for students to build on what they have mastered in the program and practice the knowledge and skills in the real world.The Internship should be relevant to student's degree competencies and contribute to the development and enforcement of the student's knowledge and skill sets in the field of Information Science.The student should propose an internship plan and the identify an internship site supervisor, who typically is external.

The site supervisor and the graduate advisor of the school need to approve the plan prior to course registration.The plan should include goals for the internship, degree competencies addressed by the internship, expected tasks to be completed, work schedule, and the assessment plan.The amount of the work should be appropriate for the units registered (3 units = 135 hours).Student may take an internship in the same organization where student is employed, but work planed for the internship need to have a clear separation from the work expected by the employment.

At the conclusion of the internship, the site supervisor is expected to submit a written assessment of student's work.Terms offered: Spring 2018688 Active Course Catalog INFO696E: Graduate Seminar The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.Terms offered: Fall 2017689 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences INFO698: Capstone Capstone Project is intended to provide an opportunity for students to show off what they have mastered in the program.The project should be relevant to MS degree competencies and contribute to the development and enforcement of the student's knowledge and skill sets in the field of Information Science.

The student should propose a project plan and the faculty advisor should approve it before registration.

2 0 0 9 welcome to cal state san bernardino csusb catalog

The project plan should include goals for the project, MS competencies addressed by the project, system design, an implementation schedule, and the assessment plan.The project plan should also include reasonable milestones and check points.The amount of the work should be appropriate for a 3-unit course Introduction to African prehistory, social anthropology, ecology, religions, ancient and modern state formation, slavery, urbanization, and contemporary issues. Terms offered: Spring 2018   We will also consider how our studying of living primates can help us gain insight into human adaptation and behavior. Terms offered:  .The amount of the work should be appropriate for a 3-unit course.

The primary faculty advisor must be an SI faculty, but faculty members from other units may participate in advising the student.

Terms offered: Spring 2018690 Active Course Catalog INFO699: Independent Study Independent studies are intended to cover advanced material outside of or beyond the scope of current course offerings Where to order a coursework ecology quality 98 pages / 26950 words Writing Master's 4 days.Terms offered: Spring 2018690 Active Course Catalog INFO699: Independent Study Independent studies are intended to cover advanced material outside of or beyond the scope of current course offerings.The topic should be relevant to MS degree competencies and contribute to the development of the student's knowledge and skill sets in the field of Information Science Where to order a coursework ecology quality 98 pages / 26950 words Writing Master's 4 days.The topic should be relevant to MS degree competencies and contribute to the development of the student's knowledge and skill sets in the field of Information Science.The student should propose a study plan and the faculty advisor should approve it before registration.The study plan should include learning objectives, readings and/or activities, a schedule of the meetings between the student and the faculty advisor, and the learning outcome and its assessment.The amount of the work should be appropriate for the requested credits.

The primary faculty advisor must be an SI faculty, but faculty members from other units may participate in advising the student.Terms offered: Spring 2018691 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences INFO900: Research Terms offered: Spring 2018 INFO920: Dissertation Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).Terms offered: Spring 2018692 Active Course Catalog College of Social & Behavioral Sciences IRLS441: Children's Lit in Span Terms offered: Fall 2017 IRLS596K: Meth+Mat Literary Rsrch The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.Terms offered: Fall 2017694 Active Course Catalog Bibliographical materials; research resources, techniques, and problems directed toward graduate study in music.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 IRLS634: Data Mgmnt/Hlthcare Syst Taught odd numbered years Focuses on development and maintenance of healthcare databases for application in solving healthcare problems.Design methods, database structures, indexing, data dictionaries, retrieval languages, and data security are presented.Terms offered: Spring 2018695 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences IRLS646: Hlth Care Informat Thry Focuses on the theoretical basis of healthcare informatics with an emphasis on management and processing of healthcare data, information, and knowledge.Healthcare vocabulary and language systems, and basic database design concepts are addressed.Terms offered: Spring 2018 IRLS681E: Law Library Pract+Admin This course will focus on a wide range of issues dealing with law library practice and administration, including but not limited to digital law libraries, collection development, law library administration, teaching legal research, database management, professional ethics and intellectual property issues.

Several classes will be taught by guest lecturers, primarily librarians from the law library.Terms offered: Fall 2017696 Active Course Catalog IRLS689A: Teaching Legal Research This course is for students who seek to be law librarians.The course will meet once a week for two hours where the students will develop lesson plans and practice teaching legal research in specific areas such as the case, the statute and legislative history, secondary sources, non-legal research, CALR, administrative law and the internet.We will videotape their practice classes to critique and to allow students to monitor their own teaching styles.

They will also develop web pages for the course.

The course will culminate with the students actually teaching the Intermediate Legal Research (boot camp) class which takes place the week after the Spring semester ends.Terms offered: Spring 2018697 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Information Science, Technology & Arts698 Active Course Catalog ISTA100: Great Ideas of the Info Age Important ideas and applications of information science and technology in the sciences, humanities and arts.Information, entropy, coding; grammar and parsing; syntax and semantics; networks and relational representations; decision theory, game theory; and other great ideas form the intellectual motifs of the Information Age and are explored through applications such as robotic soccer, chess-playing programs, web search, population genetics among others.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ISTA116: Statistic Foundations Info Age Understanding uncertainty and variation in modern data: data summarization and description, rules of counting and basic probability, data visualization, graphical data summaries, working with large data sets, prediction of stochastic outputs from quantitative inputs.Operations with statistical computer packages such as R.

Terms offered: Spring 2018699 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ISTA130: Computational Thinking & Doing An introduction to computational techniques and using a modern programming language to solve current problems drawn from science, technology, and the arts.Topics include control structures, elementary data structures, and effective program design and implementation techniques.Terms offered: Spring 2018700 Active Course Catalog ISTA131: Dealing with Data At the core of Information Science lies the digital data that is the object of study.This course aims to introduce the tools, techniques, and issues involved with the handling of this data: where it comes from, how to store and retrieve it, how to extract knowledge from the data via analysis, and the social, ethical, and legal issues involved in its use.

Throughout the course, students will be given hands-on experience with actual datasets from a variety of sources including social media and citizen science projects, as well as experience with common tools for analysis and visualization.Students will also examine topical case studies involving legal and ethical issues surrounding data.Terms offered: Fall 2017701 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ISTA161: Ethics in a Digital World This course explores the social, legal, and cultural fallout from the exponential explosion in communication, storage, and increasing uses of data and data production.In this class, we emphasize the opposing potentials of information technologies to make knowledge widely available and to distort and restrict our perceptions.In a world of rapid technological change, topics include (but are not limited to): eavesdropping and secret communications, privacy; Internet censorship and filtering, cyberwarfare, computer ethics and ethical behavior, copyright protection and peer-to-peer networks, broadcast and telecommunications regulation, including net neutrality, data leakage, and the power and control of search engines.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 ISTA230: Intro Web Design-Development An introduction to web design and development, with an emphasis on client-side technologies.Topics include HTML, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), JavaScript, and web design best practices.Terms offered: Spring 2018702 Active Course Catalog ISTA251: Introduction to Game Design This course provides an introduction to game design and teaches students the fundamental concepts for creating games.Students will survey many different games, exploring the issues game designers face when designing games in different genres.Students will participate in a series of game design challenges and will be responsible for designing and prototyping simple games using a game building tool.

Students will present their solutions to these challenges in front of the class for general discussion and constructive criticism.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ISTA263: Learning in Information Age Students will study how digital technologies are changing how people learn, how technology-based learning supports new approaches to assessment, how theories of learning are being developed to support research in these emerging areas, and how research on human learning is informing the design of computers that learn.Terms offered: Spring 2018703 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ISTA301: Computing and the Arts This course examines the ways in which computing and information science support and facilitate the production and creation of art in current society.A particular focus of the course will be to discuss how artists have used advances in technology and computing capacity to explore new ways of making art, and to investigate the relationships between technical innovation and the artistic process.Terms offered: Spring 2018704 Active Course Catalog ISTA302: Technology of Sound This course will provide the student with the information and experience necessary for the creation and manipulation of digital audio.

Students will have the opportunity to experience the music-making process with the technology tools and techniques that are common in both home and professional studios.The class will make use of a variety of software packages designed for contemporary music production, explaining the universal techniques and concepts that run through all major software programs.Topics will include musical analysis, MIDI control, synthesis techniques, audio editing, and audio mixing.Lab assignments will emphasize hands-on experience working with musical hardware and software to provide the necessary skills to create music based on today¿s musical styles.The course provides the foundation for further study, creative applications, and personal expression.

Terms offered: Spring 2018705 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ISTA303: Intro to Creative Coding While the 20th Century saw the rise of the knowledge worker and the information worker, the 21st Century has ushered in the era of the creative professional.Our society is being rapidly transformed by new technologies that are revolutionizing many spheres of life, from entrepreneurship to artistic production.This course provides an introduction to software and hardware packages that are spurring innovation and creativity.Students will explore rapid prototyping, object design, and physical computing using Computer-Aided Design Software, 3D printing technology, and Arduino circuit boards.The Processing programming language will be introduced in this course and used to create generative artworks in both visual and audio idioms.

An overview of creative evolutionary computation will survey applications of genetic algorithms and artificial intelligence for creating art.Terms offered: Spring 2018706 Active Course Catalog ISTA311: Foundation of Info & Inference An introduction to the mathematical theories of probability and information as tools for inference, decision-making, and efficient communication.Topics include discrete and continuous random variables, measures of information and uncertainty, discrete time/discrete state Markov chains, elements of Bayesian inference and decision-making, Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood parameter estimation, and elementary coding theory.Terms offered: Spring 2018707 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ISTA350: Prog for Informatics Apps This course will provide an introduction to informatics application programming using the python programming language and applying statistical concepts from a first semester statistics course.A key goal of this course is to prepare students for upper division ISTA courses by expanding on the skills gained in ISTA 116 and 130 but will be broadly applicable to any informatics discipline.

Throughout the semester students will be faced with information application problems drawn from several different disciplines in order to expand their breadth of experience while simultaneously increasing their depth of knowledge of scientific and informatics programming methods.Students will practice problem decomposition and abstraction, gaining experience in identifying commonly occurring information processing issues and in applying well-known solutions.In addition, students will design their own algorithmic solutions to problems and will learn how to effectively compare different solutions, evaluating efficiency in order to choose the best solution for a given problem.Periodic code reviews will be held in order to expose students to a range of different solution methods, which will aid them in discovering weaknesses in their own work and will improve their ability to communicate with others on technical topics.The course will include an introduction to the python scientific computing libraries and other statistical packages.

Additional course topics will include the use of version control systems, software profiling, general software engineering practices and basic shell scripting.Terms offered: Spring 2018708 Active Course Catalog ISTA352: Images: Past, Present, Future A significant portion of the human brain is devoted to understanding spatial data and its relation to the world.Through the ages humans have naturally developed external representations of such information for communication, planning, understanding, and entertainment.Further, the digital age has led to an explosion of images available to everyone in forms that are convenient to share, manipulate, and automatically mine for information.

In this thematic course we will study images from perspectives that transcend disciplines, and applicable to many of them, including the arts, science and biomedicine, computational intelligence, geography, and security.

We will study what images are, how images are stored and distributed, the reproduction of images, how they can be manipulated, using images for visualization, and extracting semantics from images.Terms offered: Spring 2017709 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ISTA391: Preceptorship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of instruction and practice in actual service in a department, program, or discipline.Teaching formats may include seminars, in-depth studies, laboratory work and patient study.Terms offered: Spring 2018710 Active Course Catalog ISTA416: Intro: Human Computer Interact The field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) encompasses the design, implementation, and evaluation of interactive computing systems.This course will provide a survey of HCI theory and practice.

The course will address the presentation of information and the design of interaction from a human-centered perspective, looking at relevant perceptive, cognitive, and social factors influencing in the design process.It will motivate practical design guidelines for information presentation through Gestalt theory and studies of consistency, memory, and interpretation.Technological concerns will be examined that include interaction styles, devices, constraints, affordances, and metaphors.Theories, principles and design guidelines will be surveyed for both classical and emerging interaction paradigms, with case studies from practical application scenarios.As a central theme, the course will promote the processes of usability engineering, introducing the concepts of participatory design, requirements analysis, rapid prototyping, iterative development, and user evaluation.

Both quantitative and qualitative evaluation strategies will be discussed.This course is co-convened: Upper-level undergraduates and graduate students are encouraged to enroll.Graduate students will be expected to complete more substantial projects and will be given more in-depth reading assignments.Terms offered: Spring 2018711 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ISTA421: Intro to Machine Learning Machine learning describes algorithms which can modify their internal parameters (i., "learn") to recognize patterns and make decisions based on examples or through interaction with the environment.This course will introduce the fundamentals of machine learning, will describe how to implement several practical methods for pattern recognition, feature selection, clustering, and decision making for reward maximization, and will provide a foundation for the development of new machine learning algorithms.Terms offered: Fall 2017 ISTA422: Applied Cyberinfrastruct Conc Students will learn from experts from projects that have developed widely adopted foundational Cyberinfrastrcutrue resources, followed by hands-on laboratory exercises focused around those resources.Students will use these resources and gain practical experience from laboratory exercises for a final project using a data set and meeting requirements provided by domain scientists.Students will be provided access to computer resources at: UA campus clusters, iPlant Collaborative and at NSF XSEDE.

Students will also learn to write a proposal for obtaining future allocation to large scale national resources through XSEDE.Terms offered: Fall 2017712 Active Course Catalog ISTA450: Artificial Intelligence The methods and tools of Artificial Intelligence used to provide systems with the ability to autonomously problem solve and reason with uncertain information.Topics include: problem solving (search spaces, uninformed and informed search, games, constraint satisfaction), principles of knowledge representation and reasoning (propositional and first-order logic, logical inference, planning), and representing and reasoning with uncertainty (Bayesian networks, probabilistic inference, decision theory).Terms offered: Spring 2018713 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ISTA451: Game Development This course provides an introduction to video game development.We will explore game design (not just computer games, but all games) and continue with an examination of game prototyping.

Once we have working prototypes, we will continue with the development of a complete 2D computer game.The remaining course topics include: designing the game engine, rendering the graphics to the screen, and artificial intelligence.Students will be given periodic homework that reinforces what was learned in class.Homework will include developing a game prototype, game design documentation, some programming tasks.Students will work in small teams to develop a working game as a term project.

Grades will be primarily based on the term project with some small amount of weight to homework.The examples provided in class will be programmed in Java and available for execution on any operating system.Programming homework assignments will be done in either Java or the language chosen by the instructor.The term project can be written in any programming language with instructor permission.Terms offered: Spring 2018714 Active Course Catalog ISTA457: Neural Networks Neural networks are a branch of machine learning that combines a large number of simple computational units to allow computers to learn from and generalize over complex patterns in data.

Students in this course will learn how to train and optimize feed forward, convolutional, and recurrent neural networks for tasks such as text classification, image recognition, and game playing.Terms offered: Spring 2018 Terms offered: Summer 2017715 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ISTA493: Internship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.Such work must be approved and supervised by an ISTA faculty member.Terms offered: Fall 2017 ISTA498: Senior Capstone A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies.Terms offered: Spring 2018716 Active Course Catalog ISTA498H: Honors Thesis An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors.Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence.The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.Terms offered: Spring 2018 ISTA499: Independent Study Terms offered: Fall 2017717 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences ISTA499H: Honors Independent Study Terms offered: Spring 2018718 Active Course Catalog Terms offered: Fall 2017738 Active Course Catalog JOUR430H: Inside The New York Times This Honors course will introduce students to the story behind the story of the nation's greatest newspaper.The New York Times will serve as the text for this class, along with several books about The Times and the media.

At the end of the semester, an optional trip to New York will include a visit to The Times at its new headquarters at Eighth Avenue between 40th and 41st streets.We will also plan visits to "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart" and to the "Today Show" at Rockefeller Center, meeting UA alumna Savannah Guthrie.The course is intended to help future leaders in journalism, political science, law, the arts and the sciences gain news literacy, an important complement to critical thinking.They will also be able to describe and explain global changes, cultural and social trends and domestic politics.

And they will get an insider's look at how The Times is produced every day and the challenges it faces in a digital world.

Terms offered: Spring 2017739 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR431H: Inside the Beltway This class will give students the lay of the land for journalists and others working in information and content in Washington DC.Students will learn about Washington media, past and present.They'll learn about how members of Congress and their staffs do their jobs.Federal agencies, laws, and policymaking will be examined.Students will explore how different interest groups, PACS, lobbyists, and others operate, as well as how to make sense of all of the voices.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 JOUR432: Social Justice Movement Media This course will survey the history and functions of social justice publishing.Students will consider the theoretical and practical frameworks of social justice media, which serve a swathe of social movements involving human and civil rights, education, labor, immigration, globalization, feminism, environmentalism, ethnic and racial equality, transgender rights, and global inequity.This course will provide students with the historical and theoretical frameworks necessary to evaluate and publish social justice media.Terms offered: Spring 2018740 Active Course Catalog JOUR433: Digging with Data Learn how to find, request and create databases, uncover stories using various software programs, and turn them into compelling visuals.Whether you call it data journalism, computer-assisted reporting, precision journalism, or power reporting, these skills will set you apart from your peers in any line of work.

Terms offered: Spring 2017 JOUR439: Ethics + Diversity in the News Analysis of ethical theory and how it relates to journalists' roles and responsibilities in a democratic society.Case studies involve questions of bias, accuracy, privacy and national security.Terms offered: Spring 2018741 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR447: Government Secrecy The course will focus on access to government records and meetings.From the perspective of the journalist acting on behalf of the people in a democracy, it will look at the benefits and harms caused by access to government information.Terms offered: Summer 2017 JOUR455: Environmental Journalism This applied course teaches you to write compelling, substantive stories that illuminate environmental subjects, trends and issues, often in human terms.

This course emphasizes the role of the environmental journalist not as an advocate but as a reporter who accurately and fairly reports the news.We examine the principles of journalism, the scientific process and the differences between environmental journalism and environmental communication.Guest speakers - journalists, researchers and other experts - explore key issues involved in communicating with the public about the environment.Readings and discussions examine issues of balance, scientific uncertainty, risk, accuracy and ethical codes.Terms offered: Spring 2018742 Active Course Catalog JOUR472: Science Journalism Science is one of the most powerful forces of change in the world.

This applied course covers the fundamental elements of producing news reports about science events and issues.We will examine the principles of journalism, the scientific process and the differences between science journalism and science communication.Guest speakers¿prominent science journalists and scientists¿will explore key issues involved in communicating with the public about science.Readings, case studies and discussions will examine issues of balance, scientific uncertainty, accuracy and ethical codes for science journalists.You'll write professional-quality science articles for general interest and specialized news media.

You'll learn how to gather, evaluate and organize information in ways that will produce accurate, comprehensive information for the public.Each student will write one short piece, and in pairs you'll research and produce an in-depth article.Terms offered: Fall 2017743 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR473: Reporting U.-Mexico Border Students will gain an understanding of best practices and challenges specific to reporting in the borderlands, and will conduct research in and about the border region, including interviews with area residents.

They will report findings in the form of essays, oral histories, research projects and in-depth reporting projects.Terms offered: Fall 2017 JOUR479: Professional Project This class for journalism minors provides a platform for students to bring together everything they learned in their previous classes to create a final project that applies journalistic work to their major topic or area of their interest.This course is a hands-on class in which students research and develop an idea for a journalistic website and begin implementing the necessary steps to see it through to publication.By the end of the class students should have a website, which they can launch and begin publishing content and even start generating revenue if they wish.Terms offered: Fall 2017744 Active Course Catalog JOUR480: Advanced Multimedia This is a hands-on advanced multimedia course that will provide students with the opportunity to refine their multimedia storytelling and technical production skills by producing journalistically interesting multimedia projects.

The multimedia projects will be well researched and include some combination of text, video, audio, still photographs, graphics that will be presented on a website.Through interactive exercises and assignments, emphasis will be given to improving audio, video, still image capture and editing skills.This course is a combined lecture with outside lab work being required.Intermediate computer technical knowledge and skills, basic photojournalism and multimedia are required for successful completion of this course.Terms offered: Spring 2017745 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR484: Mobile App Development This course will be a hands-on, interactive class in which you research, and develop a mobile news application.

You will develop and pitch an application, form teams and implement web technology to launch your application.By the end of the semester, you and your team will have a working application deployed on the internet.This course will take you from idea to application launch.Terms offered: Spring 2018 JOUR487: History of American Journalism The course explores the evolution of U.journalism and its intersection with American politics, economics, and culture.Students will read original primary published sources as well as secondary historical works and develop skills in historical research methods.Terms offered: Spring 2017746 Active Course Catalog JOUR489: Survey/Research Methods Expose advanced students to qualitative and quantitative research methods used in the social sciences; prepare students for designing and conducting research in upper-division courses.Terms offered: Spring 2018 JOUR490C: Arizona Cat's Eye Through extensive hands-on experience in this capstone course, students learn how to write, report, shoot, produce and edit news for broadcast.

Terms offered: Spring 2017747 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR490F: Arizona-Sonora News Students in Arizona Sonora News produce strong enterprise stories in written and multimedia formats, which are then provided to media for professional publication.

Students learn the techniques of search engine optimization and key word construction, and apply what they have learned in their other classes through the major.This engaged learning news service class enables students to demonstrate that they can produce professional quality work.Terms offered: Spring 2018 JOUR493: Internship Work on-site for a news or news-related organization under the supervision of an experienced communication professional.If combined with two 3-unit summer internships only a total of 7 units is acceptable.Terms offered: Spring 2018748 Active Course Catalog JOUR493H: Honors Internship Work on-site for a news or news-related organization under the supervision of an experienced communication professional, performing to the standards of the Honors College.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 JOUR493L: Legislative Internship Spend a semester working for Arizona Capitol TV, a nonpartisan office of the state legislature in Phoenix.Research, write and produce video segments.12 credit units, usually split between two departments.Journalism usually uses this course as a substitute for JOUR 380, with the other units counted as upper-division elective credit.Terms offered: Spring 2018749 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR496F: Media Cover/Intl Crises How international media cover conflicts and other humanitarian crises, focusing on the Arab/Muslim world.

Understanding of the business and culture of global news organizations.Terms offered: Spring 2018 This course will examine the history and development of U.Terms offered: Spring 2017750 Active Course Catalog JOUR497C: Reporting the World This course is about understanding the world as a journalist, an international specialist or an informed citizen.

It teaches how foreign correspondents gather news and examines factors that shape the global exchange of information.Terms offered: Spring 2018 JOUR498H: Honors Thesis An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors.Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence.The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.Terms offered: Spring 2018751 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR499: Independent Study An extended exploration of a journalistic topic under the supervision of a full-time faculty member.

The project can take many forms -- research paper, investigative news stories, photo essay, broadcast documentary or online report.Terms offered: Spring 2018 JOUR501B: Travel Writing This course will develop your skill at writing engaging, insightful travel stories.You'll sample excellent pieces by great travel writers.You'll sharpen your skills of observation, journaling, researching and reporting while writing a travel/place essay and a destination story.You'll also explore how to identify markets for your stories and craft a pitch letter to publish your work.

To earn graduate credit, you'll write a longer essay (750-1,000 words) and a longer destination students story (1,000-1,500 words) with at least six sources.Terms offered: Spring 2018752 Active Course Catalog JOUR501D: Food Journalism Everybody eats -- but do we know what we're eating? In this course, you'll learn the fundamentals of writing about food and food production.We will investigate local food production as well as broader food system issues, including food waste, resource consumption, and food security in southern Arizona and the borderlands.We'll also touch on issues related to covering food and nutrition, food and culture, and the economics and politics of local and global food chains.Graduate students will be required to complete one food systems story in addition to the three writing assignments, but in lieu of the daily journal.

The food systems story will take an analytical look at a large-scale issue of the food system -- obesity and hunger; access to healthy food; profitability of small farms; fishery health; ranchers and rangeland health; heritage versus hybrid crops; etc.-- and contextualize it with on-the-ground reporting in Southern Arizona.We will meet one-on-one to develop this story idea and discuss sources and research opportunities.Terms offered: Spring 2018753 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR502: Media & Terrorism This course will investigate the interplay between terrorism around the world and media content about terrorism.It will focus on how news media portray terrorism and terrorists, and the effects of terrorism and media portrayal of terrorism on the public.

While many of the assigned readings are about terrorism in the United States, including the 9/11 attack, perspectives from countries around the world are also explored.Students should keep up-to-date with developments in terrorism around the world, primarily through news reports.If events related to the course occur, be sure to bring the real-world perspectives into class discussions.Please note that some of the readings for this class will be challenging.Several explore academic theories and/or utilize complex statistical data analysis.

While background in theory or data analysis can be helpful, no special knowledge is necessary to understand the material overall.Graduate-level requirements include an extensive research paper on a topic related to media and terrorism.The final product will be a 15 to 20-page paper that will account for 30% of the final grade.Terms offered: Spring 2018754 Active Course Catalog JOUR505: Media Apprenticeship Internship with a news organization supplemented with professional development, analysis of industry trends and best practices.Graduate-level requirements include a major research paper.

Graduate-level requirements include a major research paper.Terms offered: Spring 2018 JOUR506: Intro + Adv Reporting This course is both an introductory and advanced reporting course for graduate students in the School of Journalism.It is intended for first year graduate students.Terms offered: Fall 2017755 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR507: Report with Multimedia This course is designed to give graduate students an intensive hands-on introduction to multimedia reporting.

Multimedia reporting is defined as the effective and ethical use of text, still photographs, video clips, audio, graphics and interactivity for the Web.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 JOUR508: Jour Theory & Practice This course introduces graduate students to the major theories related to the critical study of the media.Fieldwork may include publication of conclusions.Requirements include a major research paper.Terms offered: Fall 2017756 Active Course Catalog JOUR509: Internatnal+US Media Law Basic legal concepts for media in an international and U.context, including access to courts, public records and meetings; subpoenas and shield laws; prior restraint; libel; privacy; source confidentiality; intellectual property; obscenity; and broadcast regulations.Terms offered: Spring 2018 JOUR511: Feature Writing Writing the feature articles for newspapers, magazines or other media; specialized reporting and writing techniques.Graduate-level requirements include additional in-depth assignments.Terms offered: Spring 2018757 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR522: Publication Design Theory, principles and practice of layout, typography, and design for a variety of media.Graduate-level requirements include critically analyzing a major publication and redesigning it according to newest principles.

Terms offered: Fall 2017 JOUR532: Social Justice Movement Media This online course will survey the history and functions of social justice publishing.Students will consider the theoretical and practical frameworks of social justice media, which serve a swathe of social movements involving human and civil rights, education, labor, immigration, globalization, feminism, environmentalism, ethnic and racial equality, transgender rights, and global inequity.This course will provide students with the historical and theoretical frameworks necessary to evaluate and publish social justice media.Course expectations are higher for students taking the course at the 500-level.Standards for quality of writing and depth of research are higher, and assignments are more demanding.

Terms offered: Spring 2018758 Active Course Catalog JOUR533: Digging with Data Learn how to find, request and create databases, uncover stories using various software programs, and turn them into compelling visuals.Whether you call it data journalism, computer-assisted reporting, precision journalism, or power reporting, these skills will set you apart from your peers in any line of work.Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a topic of their choice related to CAR.Please confer with the course instructor early in the semester to have topic approved.This project will substitute for participation points for graduate students.

Terms offered: Spring 2017 JOUR539: Ethics + Diversity in the News Analysis of ethical theory and how it relates to journalists' roles and responsibilities in a democratic society.Case studies involve questions of bias, accuracy, privacy and national security.Graduate-level requirements include a research paper examining a major ethical issue and providing a critique regarding how the media covered the issue.Terms offered: Spring 2018759 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR547: Government Secrecy The course will focus on access to government records and meetings.From the perspective of the journalist acting on behalf of the people in a democracy, it will look at the benefits and harms caused by access to government information.

Graduate-level requirements include the research paper being twice as long as the undergrad.It is expected to be of graduate-level quality, and pose a suitable research question that could lead to a later study.Terms offered: Summer 2017760 Active Course Catalog JOUR555: Environmental Journalism This applied course teaches you to write compelling, substantive stories that illuminate environmental subjects, trends and issues, often in human terms.This course emphasizes the role of the environmental journalist not as an advocate but as a reporter who accurately and fairly reports the news.We examine the principles of journalism, the scientific process and the differences between environmental journalism and environmental communication.

Guest speakers - journalists, researchers and other experts - explore key issues involved in communicating with the public about the environment.Readings and discussions examine issues of balance, scientific uncertainty, risk, accuracy and ethical codes.Graduate-level requirements include writing an additional story and leading the writing workshops and case study discussion.Terms offered: Spring 2018761 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR572: Science Journalism Science is one of the most powerful forces of change in the world.This applied course covers the fundamental elements of producing news reports about science events and issues.

We¿ll examine the principles of journalism, the scientific process and the differences between science journalism and science communication.Guest speakers¿prominent science journalists and scientists¿will explore key issues involved in communicating with the public about science.Readings, case studies and discussions will examine issues of balance, scientific uncertainty, accuracy and ethical codes for science journalists.You¿ll write professional-quality science articles for general interest and specialized news media.You¿ll learn how to gather, evaluate and organize information in ways that will produce accurate, comprehensive information for the public.

Each student will write one short piece, and in pairs you¿ll research and produce an in-depth article.Graduate-level requirements include writing an additional story proposal, query letter and news report plus the in-depth story or multimedia piece will be longer that at the undergraduate-level.Terms offered: Fall 2017762 Active Course Catalog JOUR573: Reporting U.-Mexico Border Students will gain an understanding of best practices and challenges specific to reporting in the borderlands, and will conduct research in and about the border region, including interviews with area residents.

They will report findings in the form of essays, oral histories, research projects and in-depth reporting projects.Graduate students are expected to take on a leadership role in the class and from time to time will be assigned to lead class discussions.Graduate students may also be assigned additional readings and duties, such as increased research, writing, and organizing responsibilities.Terms offered: Fall 2017763 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR580: Advanced Multimedia This is a hands-on advanced multimedia course that will provide students with the opportunity to refine their multimedia storytelling and technical production skills by producing journalistically interesting multimedia projects.

The multimedia projects will be well researched and include some combination of text, video, audio, still photographs, graphics that will be presented on a website.

Through interactive exercises and assignments, emphasis will be given to improving audio, video, still image capture and editing skills.This course is a combined lecture with outside lab work being required.Intermediate computer technical knowledge and skills, basic photojournalism and multimedia are required for successful completion of this course.Graduate students will be required to produce a well-researched and cited 30- to 45-minute in-class PowerPoint presentation on a documentary film or filmmaker.Acceptable subjects will be listed in the assignment sheet handout.

Terms offered: Spring 2017764 Active Course Catalog JOUR584: Mobile App Development This course will be a hands-on, interactive class in which you research, and develop a mobile news application.You will develop and pitch an application, form teams and implement web technology to launch your application.By the end of the semester, you and your team will have a working application deployed on the internet.This course will take you from idea to application launch.Graduate students will be required to also research an emerging trend in news application design and functionality.

The student will write an eight-page paper on the subject and present findings to the class and local media outlets.Terms offered: Spring 2018765 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR587: History of American Journalism The course explores the evolution of U.journalism and its intersection with American politics, economics, and culture.Students will read original primary published sources as well as secondary historical works and develop skills in historical research methods.

Graduate-level requirements include a research paper suitable for presentation at an academic conference or publication in a scholarly journal in the field.Terms offered: Spring 2017 JOUR589: Survey of Research Mthds Students will be exposed to qualitative and quantitative research methods, such as historical and legal research, media analysis, content analysis, in-depth interviewing and discourse analysis.Terms offered: Spring 2018766 Active Course Catalog JOUR590C: Arizona Cat's Eye Through extensive hands-on experience in this capstone course, students learn how to write, report, shoot, produce and edit news for broadcast.Graduate-level students serve as producers, directing efforts of undergraduate reports, camera operators, and film editors.They are responsible for accuracy, completemess, fairness and objectivity of news packages.

Composition of a major paper concerning a media management issue is also expected.Terms offered: Spring 2017 JOUR590F: Arizona-Sonora News Students in Arizona Sonora News produce strong enterprise stories in written and multimedia formats, which are then provided to media for professional publication.Students learn the techniques of search engine optimization and key word construction, and apply what they have learned in their other classes through the major.This engaged learning news service class enables students to demonstrate that they can produce professional quality work.Graduate-level requirements include an additional assignment and/or taking on a leadership position.

Terms offered: Spring 2018767 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR593: Internship Terms offered: Spring 2018 JOUR596F: Media Cover/Intl Crises How international media cover conflicts and other humanitarian crises, focusing on the Arab/Muslim world.Understanding of the business and culture of global news organizations.Graduate-level requirements include more extensive research and papers.Terms offered: Spring 2018768 Active Course Catalog JOUR596L: U.Press and Latin America This course will examine the history and development of U.Graduate-level requirements include a longer research paper and leading a class discussion.Terms offered: Spring 2017769 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR597C: Reporting the World This course is about understanding the world as a journalist, an international specialist or an informed citizen.

It teaches how foreign correspondents gather news and examines factors that shape the global exchange of information.Graduate-level requirements include a higher standard of quality than undergrads.Grad students meet for a short session with the professor each week to discuss more theoretical issues or to examine international news items in more depth.Will be required to read at least two books from the list (on D2L) or of their choosing ¿run it by the professor ¿ and write short reflective book reports (format on D2L).

Will write an additional, short analytical research paper on a specific facet of either media coverage of, or international reaction to some aspect of your beat (3000 words).OR, will do a reporting/writing project focusing on some aspect of a refugee group here in Tucson.Consult early with the professor on the topic.Terms offered: Spring 2018770 Active Course Catalog JOUR599: Independent Study An extended exploration of a journalistic topic under supervision of a full-time faculty member.The project can take many forms -- research paper, investigative news stories, photo essay, broadcast documentary or online report.Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 JOUR909: Master's Report Individual study or special project or formal report thereof submitted in lieu of thesis for certain master's degrees.

Terms offered: Spring 2018771 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JOUR910: Thesis Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing).Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.Terms offered: Spring 2018 JOUR208: Linguistics The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research about Linguistics, Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons.Short research projects are required of participants.Terms offered: Spring 2017772 Active Course Catalog Terms offered: Spring 2018 JUS535: Kabbalah and Jewish Mysticism Surveys the ideology, symbolism, and major themes of Jewish mysticism as evidenced in several prominent mystical texts.

The core of this course will be reading the texts in English translation and the development of skills in reading and understanding a Jewish mystical text.Graduate-level requirements include a substantial research paper.Terms offered: Spring 2017797 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JUS538: The Book Of Psalms The characteristic features of Hebrew poetry.Examples of biblical poetry outside the book of Psalms also considered.

Graduate-level requirements include additional readings and a substantial research paper.Terms offered: Fall 2017 JUS553: Advanced Hebrew Advanced instruction in Biblical and/or Rabbinic Hebrew language and literature.Graduate-level requirements include additional meeting times and additional reading and writing assignments.Terms offered: Spring 2018798 Active Course Catalog JUS554: Spanish Inquisition The Inquisition in Spanish, European, & ethnic history: its bureaucracy and procedures; its festivities, its victims, New and Old Christians; and witches.Social, economic, and demographic context.

Graduate-level requirements include graduate students studying more deeply the economic, social and demographic context of the Inquisition, through more scholarly reading, discussion and writing.Terms offered: Spring 2018799 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences JUS596A: Approaches to Jewish Studies This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the field of Judaic Studies in general, and to the areas of specialization of the Judaic Studies faculty and of its affiliated members.Numerous approaches to Judaic Studies, including historical, archaeological, philological, literary, and social scientific will be explored.Students will become familiar with influential ideas and theoretical approaches, both past and present.They will develop skills in creative and critical thinking.

By the end of the semester, students will have an appreciation for the breadth and interdisciplinary nature of the field, and be able to undertake analysis of it at the graduate level.Terms offered: Spring 2018800 Active Course Catalog LAS693: Internship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.Terms offered: Spring 2018857 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences LAS695B: Adv Study in Lat Am Hist The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting.Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons.Research projects may or may not be required of course registrants.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 LAS696J: Latin Am: Modern Period The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.Terms offered: Spring 2018858 Active Course Catalog LAS696L: International Trade Law The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting.The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.Terms offered: Fall 2017 LAS699: Independent Study Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.

Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.Terms offered: Spring 2018859 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences LAS900: Research Terms offered: Spring 2018 LAS910: Thesis Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing).Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.Terms offered: Spring 2018860 Active Course Catalog Terms offered: Spring 20181022 Active Course Catalog LAW697Z: Patent Practice This course would instruct students in all aspects of patent applications.It would build on the theoretical concepts covered in Patent Law and involve both analysis of sample (existing) patent applications and drafting of new ones.

The key elements of patent applications will be emphasized and detailed examination of the requirements of a successful patent application undertaken.Terms offered: Spring 20181023 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences LAW698A: Pre-Bar Professional Skills The Arizona Supreme Court limits 3L students who are taking the February Bar Exam to enrolling in no more than two (2) semester hours or its equivalent in quarter hours during the month of early bar examination testing and the immediately preceding month.To fulfill these credits, students will have the opportunity to enroll in this two unit February Pre-Bar Professional Skills Study course offered by the Law College.This course is designed to improve student chances for success on the bar, provide a path to the law college's post-Bar experiential learning program, and offer a head start on developing the set of fundamental skills needed for success in professional practice.The emphasis in this newly designed course will focus on writing, analysis and test-taking skills, along with practical skills training in core substantive areas.

Terms offered: Spring 20181024 Active Course Catalog LAW698B: sionalism&LawPractic This course is intended to be the signature course of Arizona Law's groundbreaking theory-to-practice curriculum.It is designed to give Arizona Law graduates a 'leg up' with some practical skills, knowledge, and insights regarding law practice in a variety of settings, including available resources, tools and best practices for success, and common pitfalls.Incorporating a focus on many of the 'soft skills' that articles and commentators complain that new lawyers lack, the course will emphasize aspects of professionalism, ethics, and skills that are not covered in most classes in the existing curriculum.The course also includes an innovative module on the economics of law practice, which is designed in part to provoke student thought and discussion about (1) how to quickly become as valuable as they can to whatever law enterprise they join, (2) how they might chart their own career development, (3) how to build a successful solo practice, whether they choose to do so immediately after law school or later in their careers, and (4) the different practical and economic considerations driving different types of clients and different types of law offices.The course will culminate in a day spent in Phoenix for a Flinn Foundation program on civic leadership and a meeting with judges.

Students will leave this class armed with the tools to be savvier, more effective, and more confident new lawyers, and with a concrete vision of how to craft a productive and rewarding career in the law and as constructive members of their communities.Terms offered: Spring 20171025 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences LAW698C: Post-February Bar Externship This course will permit students to enroll in externships during the February Bar Experiential Curriculum (March - May).These externships can be offered for 2-6 credits with a field placement in a corporate law office, government agency, or a public interest organization.The February Bar Experiential Curriculum Working Group will provide students with a list of the law college's possible externships for which students can apply.

Students taking courses with a field placement component are expected to devote approximately 50 hours of work/field placement time per credit.

For example, students enrolled in a 2 credit externship would devote roughly 100 hours of time, or approximately 12.5 hours per week, to the course for 8 weeks.Students enrolled in a 6 credit externship for example, will devote approximately 37.5 hours per week to the course for 8 weeks.Terms offered: Spring 20171026 Active Course Catalog LAW698D: Basic Trial Advocacy The basic trial practice course is an introduction to the procedural, evidentiary and ethical requirements as well as persuasive trial techniques involved in civil and criminal trials.

Each week students will act as trial counsel executing the various skills employed during the stages of a jury trial-jury selection, opening statements, direct examination, exhibits, cross-examination, impeachment and closing arguments.Student performances will be reviewed and critiqued, and may be periodically videotaped.Terms offered: Spring 20171027 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences LAW698H: Advanced Family Law Practice This course will teach the student practitioner the basics of handling a family law case from the moment a client walks in the door.We will address fee agreements and ethics of running a law practice, with a focus of special issues in family law.The students will work a case (based on a fact scenario), including the drafting of a petition for dissolution, preparing and filing a motion for temporary orders for support, legal decision-making, and parenting time, conducting a mock temporary orders hearing, calculating child support in AZ, developing a parenting plan and mediating a case (including drafting of a position statement).

They will also learn how to effectively deal with difficult clients who have personality disorders or take unreasonable positions.Terms offered: Spring 20171028 Active Course Catalog LAW698I: IP Transactions The Intellectual Property Transactions course will be a two-unit practical course regarding how to draft, negotiate and close intellectual property agreements.The course will cover intellectual property transactional language, including terms for the licensing of copyrights, patents, trademarks and trade secrets, as well as the use of variations of such intellectual property transactional language in drafting various types of agreements, including agreements with customers, development partners, competitors, and vendors.The class will also cover negotiating and closing intellectual property transactions.The primary goals of the class will be (a) to arm students with basic drafting skills for intellectual property terms; (b) to expose students to a variety of types of agreements that include intellectual property terms; and (c) to demonstrate negotiation techniques to close intellectual property transactions, all so that, once in practice, the student will be able to draft and close intellectual property agreements to meet client needs.

Terms offered: Spring 20171029 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences LAW698M: Practicalities of Suing Govt This experiential course is intended to give students hands-on, practical training in litigating against any level of government, state or federal, primarily to overturn abuses of authority.Examples include counties exercising their authority to create special taxing districts; state departments exercising their authority to deny licenses; counties misspending public funds; state commissions abusing their authority to create voting districts; and federal government causing harm to private property while firefighting.(Civil rights litigation, a vast field with more direct constitutional foundations, is not intended to be covered here.) Through role-playing and drafting, students will form 'firms' and litigate against each other by drafting complaints, motions to dismiss, and oral argument.Students will become familiar with statutes and rules unique to suits against the government, including notices of claim, statutes of limitation, attorneys fees and sovereign immunity.

Guest lecturers from practice (US Attorney's Office, Administrative Law Judge, mediator) will be invited to some classes and attendance in court is planned for another class.Terms offered: Spring 20181030 Active Course Catalog LAW698N: Intro to Real Estate Finance This course is an introduction to the underwriting, structuring, documenting and negotiating of certain financial transactions secured by real property assets such as hotels, skyscrapers, condominiums or apartment buildings.Students will examine a fully negotiated deal term sheet and act as either lender's counsel or borrower's counsel to negotiate and build the documents that memorialize such deal terms.The course will expose students to real estate related diligence items such as title insurance, surveys, non-disturbance agreements and tenant estoppels.Students will also learn certain financial underwriting measures and risk mitigants, such as debt-service, loan-to-value ratios, LIBOR and limited recourse.

By the end of the course, students should be able to articulate how real property secured financing is structured and identify potential issues in the collateral and financing of such transactions.Terms offered: Spring 20181031 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences LAW699: Independent Study Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.Terms offered: Spring 2018 LAW910: Thesis Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation of research, artistic creation, or thesis writing) maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.Terms offered: Spring 20181032 Active Course Catalog LAW920: Dissertation Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library, research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).

Terms offered: Spring 20181033 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Linguistics1034 Terms offered: Spring 20171099 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Library & Information Science1100 LIS417: Intro to Digital Cultures Digital information technologies shape our lives.The benefits and the possible dangers of digital information technologies will be explored from a multidisciplinary perspective, looking at the insights into our digital age from history, linguistics sociology, political theory, information science, and philosophy.Students will have opportunities for active reflection on the ways in which digital technology shapes learning and social interaction.Terms offered: Spring 2018 LIS418: Information Quality This course will focus on how to insure that we can reliably get quality information and will also consider information quality from the perspective of the suppliers of information.Principles of evaluating information exchanges and sources will be discussed and topics will include the verification of the accuracy of information and the evaluation of resources in specialized subject domains.

Terms offered: Spring 20171101 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences LIS419: Knowledge in a Digital World We do all sorts of things with information technology: we play games, we listen to music, we watch movies, and we communicate with other people.But one of the main things that we use information technology for is to learn things.Toward this end, we visit Wikipedia, , The New York Times, and other such sites.Or we just Google stuff that we want to know about.This course is about how information technology is affecting the ability of individuals and institutions to acquire and share knowledge.

We will look at the following sorts of questions: * What impact are Google, iPhones, and iPads having on how we know things? * Should we trust the information that we find on social networking sites like Wikipedia and ? * How do people try to deceive us on the web? * Do intellectual property laws, such as the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, promote or impede our ability to acquire knowledge? * Can we really be informed citizens if the blogosphere completely replaces traditional journalism? * In a digital world, what things do we have a right to know and what things do we have an obligation to know? Terms offered: Fall 20171102 Active Course Catalog LIS432: Online Searching Using readings, lectures, demonstrations, and varied assignments, introduces students to search functions and indexes on the Web; proprietary databases that provide full-text articles not available on the open Web; search syntax and protocols; non-text retrieval of numeric data, photos, and other forms of information; and how to evaluate and reformulate search results.Terms offered: Spring 2018 LIS470: Database Dev and Mgmt This course covers theory, methods, and techniques widely used to design and develop a relational database system and students will develop a broad understanding of modern database management systems.applications of fundamental database principles in a stand-alone database environment using MS Access and Windows are emphasized.Applications in an Internet environment will be discussed using MySQL in the Linux platform.Terms offered: Fall 20171103 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences LIS471: Intro to Info Tech This three credit course online course introduces the student to the fundamentals of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) including: - The history and development of computing and digital approaches to information and communication - The information technology landscape including computers, networks, operating systems, software, and programming - Information ecosystems such as the Web, gaming, and social communication communities - General purpose productivity applications (word processing, advanced spreadsheets and databases), specialized application software (image, video and sound processing), and enterprise information systems (OPAC, ILS) - Coding fundamentals including HTML, CSS and Javascript - Information technology and the individual; information technology and society - The use of information technologies by, and impact on, information professions and institutions such as libraries, archives and museums Terms offered: Spring 20181104 Active Course Catalog LIS472: Government Information The U.

government collects, generates, publishes and distributes a vast amount and variety of information.All information professionals-even those who do not intend to specialize as government document librarians-should understand the organization of and promote access to this body of work.In this course, lectures, discussions, and readings will acquaint students with theoretical and practical knowledge.

The assignments will provide opportunities for deeper exploration of government information policies and resources.

Terms offered: Spring 2017 LIS475: User Interf+Website Dsgn Study of the user interface in information systems, of human computer interaction, and of website design and evaluation.Terms offered: Spring 20181105 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences LIS487: Information Seeking Behaviors Information-seeking theories, methods, and user behaviors will be covered in order to gain an understanding of how people seek, gather, retrieve and use information.Information-seeking behavior draws on literature from library and information science, psychology, and communications.Terms offered: Summer 2017 LIS493: Internship Specialized work on an individual basis, consisting of training and practice in actual service in a technical, business, or governmental establishment.Terms offered: Spring 20171106 Active Course Catalog LIS504: Found Libr+Info Services As the first course a SIRLS master's student takes, IRLS 504 provides an introduction to the library and information professions, to the SIRLS graduate program, and to roles and current issues in library and information services for the 21st Century.

Terms offered: Spring 2018 Research methodology, research design, and elementary statistics.Terms offered: Spring 20181107 College of Social & Behavioral Sciences LIS515: Organization/Information Introduction to the theories and practices used in the organization of information.Overview of national and international standards and practices for access to information in collections.Terms offered: Spring 2018 LIS517: Intro to Digital Cultures Digital information technologies shape our lives.The benefits and the possible dangers of digital information technologies will be explored from a multidisciplinary perspective, looking at the insights into our digital age from history, linguistics sociology, political theory, information science, and philosophy.

Stud